You
have
selected

  • Author

    • McHenry, James
  • Period

    • Adams Presidency

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 8

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="McHenry, James" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
Results 51-60 of 614 sorted by date (ascending)
The crisis, and almost universal wish of the people, to see you at the head of the armies of the United States, has been too strong to be resisted, the President has yielded to causes so powerful and nominated you accordingly, which has been unanimously confirmed to-day by the Senate. Thus you are again called upon by all voices, to fill a station which all think you alone qualified for at...
I am to receive tomorrow the Presidents letter to you, and leave this in the mail stage on monday, and continue with it to Alexandria. I shall not of course sleep much after getting into it till I see you. To facilitate this event, I have to request, if it can be done without inconvenience, that one of your servants may be at Alexandria to serve as a pilot for me to Mount Vernon. Adieu, most...
I do myself the honor to enclose, the copy of a letter dated 8. July 1798 the original whereof, I have left with my chief clerk, to be sent by the first mail, to Brigadier General Wilkinson; also the letter from Governor Sumner, which you was pleased to put into my hands, on Saturday. With respect to Castle Island; It appears to me proper, that the cession, made of it, should be accepted, but...
I arrived here yesterday evening and delivered your letter to the General. I have had much conversation with him, and have now the pleasure to inform you, that I expect to bring you his acceptance of the appointment with the proviso that he is not to be called into activity till such time as in your opinion circumstances may render his presence with the army indispensible. He appears to me to...
55Memorandum, 14 July 1798 (Washington Papers)
Subjects respectfully submitted to the consideration of the General of the armies of the United States by the Secry of War 1. Will it be proper that the President should forthwith, proceed to appoint the officers to the army proposed to be immediately raised, by the bill pending before Congress “to augment the army of the U.S. and for other purposes.” or will it be expedient to defer, until...
I arrived here between 7 & 8 o’clock on tuesday morning, and before seeing my family presented your letter to the President. He was at breakfast with Mrs Adams. They both read it and expressed themselves pleased. The same day I waited upon him to arrange the nominations. They stand as follows and are now before the Senate. vz. Alexander Hamilton Inspector &c. Charles C. Pinckney } Major Genls...
I retained the inclosed letter which was put into my hands with permission to take a copy of it. I hope every thing has been arranged to your satisfaction, or if not wholly, yet nearly so. I shall transmit you very soon the rules & regulations for the formation & movements of his Britannic Majestys forces, and manual exercise for the same, in order that you may consider and report whether the...
I am directed to inform you that the President of the United States, by, and with the advice and consent of the Senate, has appointed you Inspector General, with the rank of Major General; and to transmit you your commission made out accordingly. It may be proper to mention that the nominations to the Senate for the General Officers of the established, and provisional army were presented on...
I inclose you the abridged rules and regulations for the formations, field-exercise and movements of his Britannic Majesty’s forces; also some letters I have received and copies of the answers thereto on the subject of supplying you with aids de camp. I shall employ the Inspector General in revising what I have prepared relative to a system of discipline and police for the armies of the United...
You must be fully aware how liable the Executive is to be misled in forming a just estimate of the character of candidates for military appointments, when it must, so often, depend upon recommendations that may have been obtained by the importunity of applicants, from a desire to oblige some friend, or to avoid creating an enemy or, perhaps given in the hope that the army may serve to suppress...