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A Bill for the relief of sufferers under certain illegal prosecutions Whereas the constitution of the US. has provided that ‘Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of speech or of the press,’ and that ‘the powers not delegated to the US. by the constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the states respectively or to the people;’ and Congress did nevertheless on...
2Memorandum Books, 1801 (Jefferson Papers)
Jan. 1. Gave Conrad & McMun ord. on J. Barnes for 218.90. Jan. 1. Inclosed to D. Higginbotham for Reuben Perry 65.D. 2. Pd. ferrge. &c. at Geo. T. .5. 3. Pd. at Gadsby’s Alexandria lodgg. dinner &c. 5.5 servts. .75. Pd. ferrge. &c. Geo. T. .5.
7. Thos. Lehré recommended by C. Pinckney and Goodwyn by P. Butler & by Ephraim Ramsay Parker . fed. & able, but good & unmedling. Attorney of district. brother in law of Drayton the Govr. who is a violent republican. therefore let him stand till further enquiry. MS ( DNA : RG 59, LAR , file of James Symonds [i.e., Simons], 10:0777); undated; entirely in TJ’s hand, written in several sittings,...
I recieve with due sensibility the congratulations of the Senate on being called to the first Executive office of our government, and I accept with great satisfaction their assurances of support in whatever regards the honor & interest of our country. knowing no other object in the discharge of my public duties, their confidence in my future conduct derived from past events, shall not be...
I beg leave through you to inform the honorable the Senate of the US. that I propose to take the oath which the Constitution prescribes to the President of the US. before he enters on the execution of his office, on Wednesday the 4th. inst. at twelve aclock in the Senate chamber. I have the honor to be with the greatest respect Sir Your most obedient and most humble servant RC (Charles N....
I was desired two or three days ago to sign some sea letters to be dated on or after the 4th. of Mar. but in the mean time to be forwarded to the different ports; and I understood you would countersign them as the person appointed to perform the duties of Secretary of state , but that you thought a reappointment to be dated the 4th. of March would be necessary. I shall with pleasure sign such...
To give the usual opportunity of appointing a President pro tempore , I now propose to retire from the chair of the Senate: and as the time is near at hand, when the relations will cease, which have for some time subsisted between this honorable house & myself, I beg leave before I withdraw, to return them my grateful thanks for all the instances of attention & respect with which they have...
Being in want of a Steward or Maitre d’Hotel, a person [by the] name of Tate has been recommended to me, with information that he had [served] you some years in that capacity. as it is highly important to a house that that officer be honest and skilful, I have flattered myself you would be so kind as to give me his character with as much detail as would be interesting to me. I shall consider...
Your favor of the 5th. came to hand on the 20th. and I have but time to acknolege it under the present pressure of business. I recognise in it those sentiments of virtue & patriotism which you have ever manifested. the suspension of public opinion from the 11th. to the 17th. the alarm into which it throws all the patriotic part of the federalists, the danger of the dissolution of our union &...
Your’s of the 16th. has been duly recieved. it has not been in my power to enquire the price of journeymen here, as I have been very closely confined by business, and the buildings are so scattered here, that one does not know where to go for enquiry. I believe there will be a good deal of work done the ensuing season at this place, and am told workmen are more in demand here than at...
It has occurred to me that possibly you might be willing to undertake the mission as Minister Plenipotentiary to France. if so I shall most gladly avail the public of your services in that office. though I am sensible of the advantage derived from your talents to your particular state, yet I cannot suppress the desire of adding them to the mass to be employed on the broader scale of the nation...
I am much indebted to you for the trouble you have been so good as to take with messrs. Jackson & Wharton, on the subject of my tobo. for tho’ I am under no obligation to have any thing to do with them, my tobo. having been sold to Mc.Murdo & Fisher of Richmond, yet had there been any fraud in the package of the tobo. I should have no hesitation to relieve them from it. but from your favors of...
The appointment to the Presidency of the US. has rendered it necessary for me to have a private secretary, and in selecting one I have thought it important to respect not only his capacity to aid in the private concerns of the houshold, but also to contribute to the mass of information which it is interesting for the administration to acquire. your knolege of the Western country, of the army...
Feb. 23 qu. Thos. Bee . chief judge } 5th Circ. qu. John Sitgreaves of N.C. distr. judge + Joseph Clay. of Georgia + Wm. Mc.lung: Kentuky. to be circuit judge of 6th. qu. Jacob Read . judge of distr. of S.C. vice Bee qu. Wm. H. Hill
The bookbinder promises me 40. copies of the Manual on Thursday morning. your’s therefore might be offered for sale on Saturday. A commee of the H. of R. communicated to me the record of their having elected me &c. I took that occasion to make my acknolegements to the House & to the nation. their communication & my answer are entered on the Journals of the house, & I wish them published. I...
I take the liberty of asking the protection of your cover for a letter to Lieutt. Meriwether Lewis, not knowing where he may be. in selecting a private secretary, I have thought it would be advantageous to take one who possessing a knolege of the Western country, of the army & it’s situation, might sometimes aid us with informations of detail, which we may not otherwise possess. a personal...
Not knowing where the persons to whom the [enclosed are?] directed, may be at this time, and believing that this knoledge may [be] acquired at Pittsburg, I have taken the liberty of putting them under cover to you, and of adding a sollicitation that you would be so good as to address and forward them by any conveyance which may occur to the persons for whom they are, wheresoever they may...
I wrote to Maria on the 15th. inst. yours of the 12th. was recieved on the 18th. mr Tyler who was the bearer of my letter to Maria, set out so instantly after the event of the election that I could not write, but as he had promised to send Maria’s letter, he would probably notify that event at the same time. I cannot regret entirely the disappointment of meeting Maria & yourself at Monticello...
You mentioned to me in conversation here that you sometimes saw my former servant James, & that he made his engagements such as to keep himself always free to come to me. could I get the favor of you to send for him & to tell him I shall be glad to recieve him as soon as he can come to me? Francis Sayes who also lived with me formerly and, since that, with you, came here some time ago to offer...
I fear you will consider me as taking much too great a liberty in what I am now about to ask of you; and yet I have had such experience of the friendliness of your disposition, and feel such a consciousness of a reciprocal disposition to serve you, that I am emboldened to go on. being now obliged to fix myself here, I find as great difficulty in composing my houshold, as I shall probably find...
I inclose you another letter from mr Lieper, written after a further examination of the tobo. you will find it turns out that the tobacco has [never] been wet, nor otherwise injured, except one hhd, & whether that was [wet] between Richmd & Philadelphia is uncertain; that the [pretended?] great deficiencies in weight are entirely retracted: that the tobacco is not as good in quality by about ¾...
I have to thank you for a copy of your introductory lecture recieved some time since, & not before acknoleged for want of time. I have read it with great pleasure, and lament that while I have been so near to your valuable collection, occupations much less pleasing to me have always put it out of my power to avail myself of it. may I ask the favor of you to present my request to your son that...
Your favor of the 18th. did not get to my hand till yesterday. I thank you for the accomodation in point of time therein offered; circumstances may render it a convenience, in which case I will avail myself of it, without too far encroaching on your wishes. at this [moment] it is not in my power to say any thing certain on the subject of time. the declarations of support to the administration...
You have no doubt heard of the unfortunate fate of poor mr Holmes. he happened to be alone on his scaffold at the time; so no one knows what occasioned his fall. he was a valuable young man, and his loss has given great concern to me, as it must doubtless his friends. the object of the present is to see if you can procure one to supply his place. good humor & sobriety are the two indispensable...
The liberality of the conversation you honored me with yesterday evening has given me great satisfaction, & demands my sincere thanks. it is certain that those of the cabinet council of the President should be of his bosom-confidence. our geographical position has been an impediment to that, while I can with candor declare that the imperfect opportunities I have had of acquaintance with you...
I recieve Gentlemen with profound thankfulness, this testimony of confidence from the great representative council of our nation . it fills up the measure of that grateful satisfaction which had already been derived from the suffrages of my fellow citizens themselves, designating me as one of those to whom they were willing to commit this charge, the most important of all others to them. In...
After exactly a week’s balloting there at length appeared 10. states for me, 4. for Burr & 2. voted blanks. this was done without a single vote coming over. Morris of Vermont withdrew, so that Lyon’s vote became that of the state. the 4. Maryland federalists put in blanks, so that the vote of the 4. Republicans became that of their state. mr Huger of S. Carolina (who had constantly voted for...
As it is now settled that I am to [remain here] I can no longer […] to build myself the nailshop at Monticello which I proposed to you to undertake. I must therefore engage you to do it yourself out & out, and will give you the price you then stated to be the lowest you could take. what that was I do not now recollect with certainty, but I have a note of it at home, made at the time as I...
Notwithstanding the suspected infidelity of the post, I must hazard this communication. The Minority in the H. of R. after seeing the impossibility of electing B. the certainty that a legislative usurpation would be resisted by arms, and a recourse to a Convention to reorganise & amend the government, held a consultation on this dilemma, Whether it would be better for them to come over in a...
I do myself the honor to enclose to you a Resolution of the Senate of this day. I have the honor to be, Sir, Your most obedient and very humble servant RC ( DNA : RG 59, MLR ); at foot of text: “The President of the United States”; in hand of Samuel A. Otis, signed by TJ. Not recorded in SJL . Enclosure: Senate resolution of 18 Feb. (same, in Otis’s hand; see below). The Senate on 18 Feb.,...
The House of Representatives having yesterday concluded their choice of a person for the chair of the US. and called me to that office, it now becomes necessary to provide an administration composed of persons whose qualifications and standing have possessed them of the public confidence, and whose wisdom may ensure to our fellow citizens the advantages they sanguinely expect. on a review of...
Your favor of the 3d. inst. has been duly recieved. I percieve in it that friendship which I ever found in your character, & which honors every character in which it is found. I feel myself indebted also for the justice you do me as to opinions which others, with less candour, have imputed to me. I have recieved many letters stating to me, in the spirit of prophecy, caricatures which the...
qu. Lowell (now district judge) to be Chief judge + Benj. Bourne (R.I.) } judges of 1st. circuit + Jer. Smith. (N.H.) qu John Davis. (now district atty) judge vice Lowell — H. G. Otis distr. atty vice Davis. qu. Ray Greene distr. judge vice Bourne — E. St. L. Livermore. N.H. distr. atty vice Smith. 2d. circ uit + Benson. chief judge
Notwithstanding the suspected infidelity of the post, I must hazard this communication. The Minority in the H. of R. after seeing the impossibility of electing B. the certainty that a legislative usurpation would be resisted by arms, and a recourse to a Convention to reorganise & amend the government, held a consultation on this dilemma. Whether it would be better for them to come over in a...
I find myself very much indebted for your kind agency in the purchase of the lands for me from the Henderson’s, and shall be still more so if you will take for me also Tucker Woodson’s part at the price of 500. D. proposed by him, putting off paiment till the month of June, within the course of which all the shares shall be paid for. you mention having bought mr Kerr’s part. I do not know...
a letter from mr Pinckney to mr Thompson the brother in law of mr Mercer , communicated to mr Rodney, by mr Duval who had seen it, and to Colo. Mercer by Thompson . ‘that nothing had raised the credit of America in the eyes of Europe, & even of England itself, as the late election; & that had he been here himself he would have supported it with all his might.’ MS ( DLC : TJ Papers, 232:42032);...
David Gelston of N.Y. Collector of revenue vice Sands. recommdd. by Genl. John Smith . estimable, popular, a merchant formerly.—but Armstrong says not estimated devoted to Burr. at any rate this is to lie for further information. Willett is not popular, not esteemd liv’d. in ad—y &c—a tool &c— not approvd. by Clinton. devotd to B. Rogers the naval officer is an Englishman, come over not long...
Your favor of Jan. 7. came duly to hand. a part of it gave me that kind of concern which I fear I am destined often to meet. men professing minds of the first order, and who have had opportunities of being known & of acquiring the general confidence, do not abound in any country beyond the wants of the country. in your case however it is a subject of regret rather than of complaint, as you are...
Feb. 16. see the Wilmington Mirror of Feb. 14. mr Bayard’s elaborate argument to prove that the common law, as modified by the laws of the respective states at the epoch of the ratificn of the constn, attached to the courts of the US. MS ( DLC : TJ Papers, 108:18534); entirely in TJ’s hand; on same sheet as Notes on a Conversation with Gen. John Armstrong, 14 Feb. Wilmington Mirror : Mirror of...
Your letter, my dear Maria, of the 2d. inst. came to hand on the 8th. I should have answered it instantly according to our arrangement, but that I thought, by waiting till the 11th. I might possibly be able to communicate something on the subject of the election. however, after 4. days of balloting, they are exactly where they were on the first. there is a strong expectation in some that they...
I have recieved several letters from you which have not been acknoleged. by the post I dare not, and one or two confidential opportunities have past me by surprise. I have regretted it the less, because I knew you could be more safely and fully informed by others. mr Tyler, the bearer of this, will give you a great deal more information personally than can be done by letter. four days of...
Your favor of Jan. 30. by mr Tyler your nephew has been duly recieved, and I read in it with great satisfaction the expression of friendly regard which I can with truth reciprocate. we have had a long course together, and in the moments of trial, I have seen you always at your post. our political vessel has rode very uneasily under the gales of monarchy: I hope, when put on her republican...
Your favor of Jan. 18 . is duly recieved. the subject of it did not need apology. on the contrary should I be placed in office, nothing would be more desireable to me than the recommendations of those in whom I have confidence, of persons fit for office. for if the good withold their testimony, we shall be at the mercy of the bad. if the question relative to mr Zantzinger had been merely that...
I have to acknolege the reciept of your favors of Feb. 5. & 9. and to thank you for the pamphlet contained in the former one which was a desideratum to me. I will forward the diplomas to Chr. Livingston & mr Stewart. the latter is almost out of date. I am Dear Sir Your most obedt. servt PrC ( DLC ); at foot of text: “Mr. Andrew Ellicot”; endorsed by TJ in ink on verso. Ellicott’s letter of 9...
Feb. 14 Genl Armstrong tells me that Gouvernr. Morris in conversation with him today on the scene which is passing expressd himself thus. how come it, sais he, that Burr who is 400. miles off (at Albany) has agents here at work with great activity, while mr Jefferson, who is on the spot, does nothing?’ this explains the ambiguous conduct of himself & his nephew Lewis Morris, and that they were...
I have to acknolege the reciept of your favors of Jan 12. & Feb. 5. it is far from being certain at this date that I shall have any thing to do with the executive councils of the country. yet as you make the movements of your son to depend in some measure on the circumstance stated in your letter of Jan. 12. I will hazard an observation which will merit no more weight than would have that of...
You were chosen a member of the American philosophical society so long ago as 1797. and as I lived at a distance from Philadelphia, the Secretaries were advised how to address your diploma when it should be filled up. by some accident unexplained to me it seems it has never been forwarded. I did not know this till I recieved it a few days ago. I have the honour now to inclose it. the bones you...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to Doctr. Thornton. he has recieved his friendly invitation to pass the evening on Monday next; but for 10. years past he has been in the habit, from considerations of health, of never going out in the evening. his friends have been so kind as to indulge this habit, & he is sure Dr. Thornton will accept it as an apology. RC ( DLC : William Thornton...
The H. of R. has been in conclave ever since 2. oclock yesterday. At 10. P.M. 17 ballots had been tried, & were invariably 8. 6. & 2 divided. I have not heard from the Capitol this morning. I can venture nothing more by the post but my affectionate salutations, to yourself & mrs. Madison. P. S. 1. P.M. The H. of R. suspended the balloting from 7. to 12. this morning, & after trying a few more...
The H. of R. has been in conclave ever since 2. aclock yesterday. 25. balots have been taken at intervals of from half an hour to an hour. they were invariably 8. 6. & 2. divided. I can venture nothing mo[re by] the post but my affectionate salutations. PrC ( DLC ); faint, text in brackets supplied from Documents ii–v ; in ink at foot of text TJ wrote the names of Mann Page, John Page, James...