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It has been repeatedly mentioned to me that you have, on different occasions, asserted the existence of a British Faction in this Country, embracing a number of leading or influential characters of the Federal Party (as usually denominated) and that you have sometimes named me, at other times plainly alluded to me, as one of this description of persons: And I have likewise been assured that of...
The very obliging manner, in which you was pleased to assure me of the appointment of my nephew Philip Church , and the actual appointment of my relation Captan Hamilton to a Lieutenancy in the Navy, which I just learn from the Marine Department, are circumstances from which I derive much pleasure, which I consider as conferring upon me a personal obligation, and for which I beg you to accept...
I had the honor of receiving, an hour since, your letter of the 22d instant, with the copy of one to you from Colonel Smith. I am happy to think that the question presented is on mere military principles a very simple one. The rule of promotion, by succession, does not in any service, as far as my knowlege goes, apply to a new corps, in its first organisation. Officers for such a corps, it is...
I shall with pleasure obey the command contained in your letter of the 17th instant and shall accordingly inform the Governor that I am ready to proceed in the execution of the measure. With perfect respect and esteem / I have the honor to be / Sir / Yr Obed Servant MHi : Adams Papers.
The time which has elapsed since my letter of the first of August last was delivered to you precludes the further expectation of an answer. From this silence, I will draw no inference; nor will I presume to judge of the fitness of silence on such an occasion, on the part of the Chief Magistrate of a Republic, towards a citizen, who without a stain has discharged so many important public...
I had the honor of receiving, an hour since, your letter of the 22d instant, with the copy of one to you from Colonel Smith. I am happy to think that the question presented is on mere military principles a very simple one. The rule of promotion, by succession, does not in any service, as far as my knowlege goes, apply to a new corps, in its first organisation. Officers for such a corps, it is...
The very obliging manner, in which you was pleased to assure me of the appointment of my nephew Philip Church , and the actual appointment of my relation Capta [ i ] n Hamilton to a Lieutenancy in the Navy, which I just learn from the Marine Department, are circumstances from which I derive much pleasure, which I consider as conferring upon me a personal obligation, and for which I beg you to...
It has been repeatedly mentioned to me that you have, on different occasions, asserted the existence of a British Faction in this Country, embracing a number of leading or influential characters of the Fœderal Party (as usually denominated) and that you have sometimes named me, at other times plainly alluded to me, as one of this description of persons: And I have likewise been assured that of...
General Wilkinson, who has been some weeks in this City, in consequence of an invitation having for object the readjustment of our Western Military affairs, is about to make a journey to Braintree to pay his respects to you. On such an occasion, I hope it will not be thought improper that I should address you on the subject of this officer; since what I shall say will accord with what I know...
I shall with pleasure obey the command contained in your letter of the 17th instant and shall accordingly inform the Governor that I am ready to proceed in the execution of the measure. With perfect respect & esteem I have the honor to be Sir Yr obed servant ALS , Adams Family Papers, deposited in the Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston; ADf , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress.
I have recommended to the Secretary at War, Mr Philip Church, my nephew, for the appointment of a Captain of Infantry. This young Gentleman is personally known to you; but your knowlege of him is too slight to render it useless to speak of his qualifications. To the advantages of a good education he adds a very discreet judicious mind and an excellent heart—duly animated by that laudable pride...
The time which has elapsed since my letter of the first of August was delivered to you precludes the further expectation of an answer. From this silence, I will draw no inference; nor will I presume to judge of the fitness of silence on such an occasion, on the part of The Chief Magistrate of a Republic, towards a citizen, who without a stain has discharged so many important public trusts. But...
General Wilkinson, who has been some weeks in the City, in consequence of an invitation having for object the readjustment of our Western Military affairs, is about to make a journey to Bra [ i ] ntree to pay his respects to you. On such an occasion, I hope it will not be thought improper that I should address you on the subject of this officer; since what I shall say will accord with what I...
I have recommended to the Secretary at War, Mr Philip Church, my nephew, for the appointment of a Captan of Infantry—This young Gentleman is personally known to you; but your knowlege of him is too slight to render it useless to speak of his qualifications. To the advantages of a good education, he adds a very discreet judicious mind and an excellent heart—duly animated by that laudable pride...
Col Toussard, who will have the honor of delivering you this letter, is desirous of being appointed Inspector of Artillery. He has reason to hope that his wish is favoured by the Secretary at War—and seems to think that the intimation of my opinion may be useful to him. On the supposition that it accords with the views of the head of the War Department, I have no hesitation to add my...
Not having recd. an acknowledgemt. of my letter to you of the 8th. inst. I send you a copy— You will please to direct Lt. Gibson of the Corps of Artillerists to repair to Fort Mifflin and take the orders of the Commanding Officer there till he shall be directed to join his Company. You will likewise detach the Artificers of Capt. Elliott’s Company to the same place With great consideration I...
New York, June 8, 1799. “It is concurred to be expedient for some time to come to keep a body of troops in and near that district of Country in which the late insurrection existed. In this Service it is intended for the present to continue the troops now at Reading.… General McPherson recommended the occupying of three stations Reading, Allentown , & Easton . If the Corps of troops was more...
You will be pleased to inquire of un Capt. Shoemaker and Lieut. Boote whether they have any unexpended supply of money and cloathing for continuing the recruiting service; and report to me accordingly— With great consideration &c ( LS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; copy, in the handwriting of Ethan Brown, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
New York, August 23, 1799. “… I am not anxious that any part of your force should be stationed at Easton if you think it of importance to keep the whole united. It would however be a strong motive to the stationing of a small party at Easton if the recruiting service could be benefited by the measure. It is not convenient at present to reinforce your detachment, but as I am not apprehensive of...
The Secretary of war mentions to me that he has been informed by several respectable Gentlemen of Baltimore that there is enlisted with Lieut. Boote a person by the name of John Forysth of a very weak and feeble constitution—That the family of this person are extremely distressed on at his situation, and propose the furnishing offer to furnish an able substitute, or to advance a reasonable sum...
Capt. Massey’s Company of Artillerists having been ordered from fort Mifflin you will immediately cause Capt. Irvin’s Compy. to proceed to that Fort to replace the other. For this purpose, you will take the proper arrangement with the contractor’s Agent for transportation and supply from Reading to Fort Mifflin. The Compy. will avoid going into Philadelphia With great consideration &c P.S. I...
I have received your letter of the 15th. inst. You will direct the Officers to make out returns of the deficient Articles for their troops, which you will forward to Colonel Ebenezer Stevens at this place who will take care to have them furnished— With great consideration &c ( LS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; copy, in the handwriting of Ethan Brown, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
I have written to Captains Irvine and Shoemaker directing the first to put himself in readiness to march, and the last to proceed with his company to Pittsburg taking with him the detachment formerly under Lieut Boote but which is now annexed to his command. I have written to these Gentlemen in the first instance because I supposed, from some letter which I have received from you that you...
I do not think it advisable to grant your request for a furlough without previously consulting Col. Ogden on the subject. I have accordingly communicated the request to that officer with the proper directions. With consideration I am, Sir yr. ob. sert. ( LS , The Andre deCoppet Collection, Princeton University Library; Df , in the handwriting of Thomas Y. How, Hamilton Papers, Library of...
I enclose to you a letter to Lieutenant Boote which you will please to have delivered. Should Mr. Boote be willing to repair to this place you will give him permission to do so. In that case you will annex his party of infantry to the other company of infantry which forms part of your detachment— With great consideration I am, Sir &c: &c: ( LS , in the handwriting of Thomas Y. How, Hamilton...
Upon the receipt of this you will be pleased to send William Millard, Sergeant Lang, Francis Peters, Cullen, Hyland, Howard and Muirhead of the company of Captain Elliot to that officer at Philadelphia— With great considern. ( LS , in the handwriting of Thomas Y. How, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; Df , in the handwriting of Thomas Y. How, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
In answer to your favour of the 22d. inst, requesting that I would exert my influence in favour of Mr. Stone, candidate for an appointment in the Army, I must advise you to suggest the character to Col. Taylor, in order that he may express his opinion. The opinion of the Colo. of the Regiment in those respects is thought desirable With respect &c— (Copy, in the handwriting of Ethan Brown,...
I have just received your letter of the 25th of November. You will repair to Staunton in Virginia and take the orders of the Commanding Officer at that place ( Df , in the handwriting of Thomas Y. How, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
You will repair without delay to Wilmington in the State of delaware for the purpose of being employed in the recruiting service—Upon you r arrival at that place you will report you r self to Major Cass and take his order— ( Df , in the handwriting of Thomas Y. How, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
Yr. letter of the 6th Inst. is come to recommendg Mr. Jas. Macleod as a candidate for an appointment in the Navy of the UStates is come to hand; & I have to inform you that I have with pleasure paid the requisite attention to the recommendation I have the honor to be &c. (Copy, in the handwriting of Ethan Brown, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
Your letter the 3d. instant is received and the name of your son as a candidate for the appointment of surgeons mate in the Navy of the United States has been communicated to the Secy. of the Navy aided by with my support. I am Sir with great respect & Esteem yr. obedt. Servt. ( Df , in the handwriting of Ethan Brown, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress). Acknowledges Archer’s letter of...
Card. The officers of the late army and navy of the United States are requested to meet at Gautier’s, on Tuesday evening, 7 o’clock, to consult on the subject of measures for the immediate security of our port and city. [New York] Argus. Greenleaf’s New Daily Advertiser , June 4, 1798. For background to this document, see the introductory note to H to James McHenry, June 1, 1798 . The report...
I send you for your information the arrangement which has been adopted for the organisation and disposition of the Regt. of Artillerists. You will perceive that the batalion which you are to command is to be stationed in You will do well to apprise without delay the officers who are to compose this batalion of the arrangement—so that such of them who may not at present be with their companies...
Your letter of the 13th April has reached me, and your desire of entering the army as Major will be made known to the Secretary of War altho together with the favorable opinion expressed of you by Col Taylor, there is as yet no vacancy. with true consideration &c ( Df , in the handwriting of Philip Church, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress). Acknowledges receipt of Barnum’s letter of April...
I have heretofore transmitted ⟨to⟩ you the arrangement of the second Regiment of ⟨Artillerists⟩ shewing the batalion which you are to command and its destination generally. Measures are taking to bring the companies not already there within the sphere of that destination. But you will immediately assume the command of all the fortified posts in the vicinity of the sea board within the States...
As an arrangement conducive to the public service I propose to you that the Postage of all letters which shall come addressed to me or the Adjutant General North or his Assistant Capt Ellery endorsed on public service should be charged in one account by whatsoever — and upon all letters going from either of us endorsed on public service and with our names should shall be charged in one...
I was glad to find my dear sir, by your letter, that you had not yet determined to go with the current of the Fœderal Party in the support of Mr Burr & that you were resolved to hold yourself disengaged till the moment of final decision. Your resolution to separate yourself, in this instance, from the Fœderal Party if your conviction shall be strong of the unfitness of Mr Burr, is certainly...
The President of Columbia College in this City has resigned & we are looking out for a successor. Dr. Wharton has occurred to me as a character worthy of enquiry, & the great confidence I feel in your judgment & candour induces me to have recourse to you. We are extremely anxious to have a well qualified man, as this is the only thing wanting to render our institution very flourishing. We have...
Several letters to myself & others from the City of Washington, excite in my mind extreme alarm on the subject of the future President. It seems nearly ascertained that Jefferson & Burr will come into the house of Rs. with equal votes, and those letters express the probability that the Fœderal Party may prefer the latter. In my opinion a circumstance more ruinous to them, or more disastrous to...
After my ill success hitherto, I ought perhaps in prudence to say nothing further on the subject. But situated as things now are I certainly have no advice to give. Yet I may without impropriety communicate a fact. It is this—Colonel Burr is taking an active personal part in favour of Mr Clinton against Mr Rensselaer as Governor of this State. I have upon my honor direct & indubitable evidence...
New York, September 1, 1800. Has reviewed their request for compensation from the Holland Land Company and concludes that their “Claim is reasonable and moderate.” Copy, Gemeentearchief Amsterdam, Holland Land Company. In 1964 the Holland Land Company documents were transferred to their present location from the Nederlandsch Economisch-Historisch Archief, Amsterdam. This letter was written in...
I have considered with attention the draft of instructions to Mr. Bayard, which appear to me full and judicious. There are but two points upon which I would submit a reflection or two— I It is prescribed that no money shall be advanced for any quantity of land purchased more than in the proportion of the intire sum to the intire quantity. It is possible that this restriction may be...
[ New York, December 26, 1798. The dealer’s catalogue description reads: “On money matters.” Letter not found. ] Sold by G. Michelmore and Company, Catalogue No. 13.
Your letter of the tenth of July has been delivered to me. I have given full information to Cl. Bentley on the subject of your enquiry, with instructions directions on t as to the course to be pursued. With much great consideration I am, Sir &c: &c: ( Df , in the handwriting of Thomas Y. How, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
Your letter of the 28th. Ulto. is received In answer I have to observe that the routine of promotion is not supposed to apply in the constitution of a new Regiment, nor till the organisation of it has been once Completed by the appointment and acceptance of the field Officers. But I have taken care to bring pretensions to the vacant Majority under the consideration of the Secy. of War. With...
Your letter of the twenty sixth of August has been delivered to me. The contents have been duly attended to, and the result when known will be communicated. I have just received your letter of the fifth of this month, and am satisfied with the explanation which that it contains. The desire which you express to cultivate harmony is highly praiseworthy, and I hope the present which the last — it...
Your several letters of the twenty fifth of September, and of the fourth, sixth and seventh of October have been duly received. I agree with you as to the advantage which would be derived to the Soldiers from the use of Hunting shirts but a change of the public arrangements with respect to Clothing would involve difficulty. there is an observation which has frequently occurred to me on this...
[ New York, July 10, 1799. On August 17, 1799, Bentley wrote to Hamilton: “Yours of the 10 Ultimo … was received in proper time.” Letter not found. ] Bentley, a Virginian and a veteran of the American Revolution, was lieutenant colonel commandant of the Seventh Regiment of Infantry. He was stationed in Richmond, Virginia.
It is matter of regret to me that I have not as yet received a single line from you in answer to several letters which I have addressed to you, to the care of Col Carrington at Richmond. I take it for granted however that it has arisen solely from the unavoidable delay incident to our relative situations. I sent you some time since a plan for the division of Virginia into districts &...
I have received your letter of the 8th. instant, and beg desire you will please to inform Mr. Thoms that I have forwarded his the recommendation in his favour to the Secy. of War the Navy, with my support— With. ( Df , in the handwriting of Ethan Brown, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress). Acknowledges Bentley’s letter of May 8, 1800. Letter not found.