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Permit me, with great sincerity, to congratulate you on your appointment to the office of Vice-President of the United States. It was in my mind a very desirable object, and a wish which I ardently expressed at the meeting of the electors; but, as we were unanimously of opinion that Mr. Adams’ pretensions to the chair were best, it was impossible to give you any votes without annulling an...
Being here on a few days visit with Mrs. Gerry to her aged parents, & having left six small children, the eldest of whom has the care of the rest and of the domesticks, I am deprived of the honor of paying my personal respects to you at this time. When I wrote to Mr. Monroe, I supposed he was in Philadelphia: it being so announced in the news papers, his conduct in making an inmate of Paris...
Your obliging letters of the 12th of may , and 21st of June, I have received; and have taken a step, by accepting the appointment to France, which it is difficult to justify to my family, under existing circumstances. Your information and opinion, which had great influence in this decission; the weighty considerations, that the appointment having been once declined, a second refusal might at...
Whilst the late envoys were in Paris, they recommended Mr William Lee, in a letter to Mr Pickering, as a suitable character for a Consul; & it was expected, he would apply for the consulate of Bourdeaux, which it was then supposed would be vacant: & he now proposes to renew his application. being informed of this circumstance, & having, after the fullest enquiry, & conviction of his merit,...
Having transmitted to Mr Pickering, additional documents, numbered from 36 to 50 inclusively, you will probably peruse them. The first, contained a copy of a motion, I made to the other Envoys; to put an end, as early as the 21st of October 1797, to the disgraceful communications of X & Y. at the bottom of the original, is a note in the handwriting of General Pinckney, which shews, that it was...
I am honored by your confidential letter of the 30th of Decer, & am sorry that any event should render it uncertain, whether you shall appoint Consuls to France. that Mr Lee, amidst the interfering applications of so many candidates, should be represented to the President as a Jacobin, is not to my mind, in this epoch of intrigue, slander, injustice, unexpected or extraordinary. but I am...
In a conference with the President of the U.S. at his house on a visit three days after his arrival he informed me that soon after his speech to Congress at the opening of the last session he required of Mr Pickering a copy of my despatches in order to send them to Congress. That after waiting a proper time he sent again to the Secretary for them. That he applied a third time & pressed their...
I have the honor to inform you, that there has lately been published in the Boston Gazettes, a letter signed “Timothy Pickering”, addressed “to P Johnston Esqr of Prince Edward County, (Virginia,) dated the 29th of September last; wherein Mr Pickering, speaking of the dispatches of the Envoys, says, “that Mr. Tallyrand affects an utter ignorance of the person, designated in the dispatches, by...
I am honored by your letters of the 7th and 8th instant. The satisfaction which you are pleased to express at my acceptance of the mission, is the most flattering circumstance of my political concerns. I have taken passage in the ship Union for Rotterdam, & expect to sail in ten days; having notified Mr Pinckney by two vessels which are to sail this day & tomorrow, of this circumstance, & of...
Mr Gerry presents his best respects to the President of the United States, & sends by the bearer ten pair of squabs, of which he requests his acceptance. They have been learnt to feed in indian dough, & when put into the pigeon House, must be supplyed daily with water & gravel, & confined to the house untill they have young—The house should be locked and under the care of one person, as they...
The bearer of this, Mr. Waldo, is the Gentleman whom I mentioned, in a letter which I had the honor to address you at paris, as an applicant for the office of Consul in some part of France. he is well known & was much respected at Paris, altho he was a zealous advocate for the rights of his Country. his character, in regard to abilities, honor, probity, & politeness, stands high with all who...
I now propose to finish my letter of the 15th, which was hastily concluded, to prevent inconvenience to my friend Lincoln. In revising your political faith , I am not clear, that we perfectly agree in regard to a navy. I wish sincerely, with yourself, to avoid the evils pointed out, as the result of a powerful navy. the expence & extensive operation of an imense naval establishment, if our...
Since my arrival here, I have not had the honor to address you: the want of health part of the time, the particular details of our official letters, the uncertainty of our residence for a week & sometimes for a day, & the painful situation in which I have been, have combined to produce a suspension of my correspondence untill I could communicate to you something agreable, but that period I am...
I am honored by your letter of the 17th, & sincerely thank you for the information it contains. Nothing is more essential to a public officer, than to be apprized of the imputations against him; for if well founded, he will thus have a fair opportunity of correcting his errors, & if unfounded, he will by the same means be better prepared for self defence. in addition to the great difficulties...
At nine oClock last evening, Mr Lee, a [sincere?] friend of yours & mine, came up from Boston to inform me of your election. The precarious state, in which by the [wiles] of party, the federal executive was suspended, the irritation which would have resulted from your non-election, even if Mr Burr had obtained the vote, the great danger of a collision of parties, whose habits of animosity,...
I inclose the remarks, which I proposed to make, when I had the honor of paying my last respects to you. The delay has been owing, in a great measure, to sickness in my family, but it cannot be attended with any ill consequences. I shall wait on you soon, with the information for explaining such parts of the curious Journal of General Martial, relating to myself, as you was pleased to...
I had the honor, this morning of paying my respects to your Lady, & the pleasure of finding her & the family in excellent health: happy should I be, if this was the case with Mrs Gerry, who is slowly recovering from a long & dangerous illness. being informed that you are by this time in Washington, I take the liberty to suggest, that since your departure, last fall from Quincy, I have received...
A social friend, but not one whose politicks have been much in unison with mine, has suggested to me the policy of your sending Mr Jefferson, at the present crisis, as a minister to France. at first blush, the measure struck me forcibly: Mr Jefferson being much in the confidence of France, & of her officers & adherents in the United States; the antipode of her enemies amongst us; possessed of...
I propose to embark for the United States this day, & have only a moment to inform you that Mr Skipwith will transmit you from Paris the letters which passed between the minister of foreign affairs & myself, just before my departure from that city— The aspect of affairs between the two republicks is very pacific at present on this side the Atlantick; God grant it may be so on my arrival the...
I received yesterday from Mr Lee, the letter enclosed, & being fully convinced, that he is an object of persecution, as well on account of his open & manly disapprobation of the measures of a certain party, as well as of his uniform and warm attachment to your administration, an indispensable requisite in my opinion for every candidate of office, I feel myself under an obligation of justice to...
The sailing of the Packet on which we are to go to New Port, being unexpectedly deferred till this afternoon, gives me an opportunity of inclosing a copy of No 3, & of adding a few words. I know that your ideas now are the same which they were in 1776 respecting a vigorous executive: I then & for several years afterwards tho’t the necessity for one so powerful would not exist within half a...
The information communicated by the Secretary of State, of my appointment to the office of an envoy extraordinary & minister plenipotentiary to the French republick, afforded me the highest gratification: inasmuch as it manifested the confidence of that political character, for whom, from my first acquaintance, I have ever had the highest respect. judge then, Sir, of my feelings when I inform...
I am honored with your letters of the 13th & 20th of Feby, the former of which, being an answer to my last, shall be first attended to. After I had sent that letter to the post office, it occurred to me, that what I had viewed as a studied neglect might have been intended as good policy; & being convinced it was so, by reflecting on the subject, I was highly gratified by the explanation with...
If an answer to the letter, which Your Excellency proposed to write to Mr Pickering on my concerns, is received, I will do myself the honor of waiting on You at any time which may best suit your convenience. Mrs Gerry unites with me in best respects to yourself & Lady, & be assured I remain, Dear Sir, with every sentiment / of attachment, Your / most obedt & very / huml Sert. MHi : Adams Papers.
Remarks on General Marshalls letter of the 12th of Nov, & Mr Pickerings of the 10th of December 1798 to Mr Gerry: respectfully submitted by the latter to the President of the United States of America. 1st. In regard to the source of the information (relative to the renewal of one or both the money propositions) which General Marshall thinks, I must have supposed to be him; I had not the means...
Inclosed is a copy of a letter which I wrote to Mr. Monroe the 4th of april, to the care of yourself; and annexed is the copy of one to yourself of the 27th of march; both of which, I presume from their not being acknowledged, have been intercepted: and if this is the case, I wish to ascertain it. I have the honor to remain with the most perfect esteem & respect yours sincerely RC ( DLC ); at...
I have the honor to enclose a copy of my letter to the Secretary of state, & your pamphlet, with the paragraph which I mentioned. Mrs Gerry unites with me, in best respects to yourself & Lady, & complimts to Mrs Smith and Your family— I remain dear Sir with sincere / attachment Your most / obedt Sert MHi : Adams Papers.
It was always my sincere intention, but you have made it my indispensible duty, to support your administration. a good disposition is requisite, & so is ability. diplomatic politics I am not much versed in, & my inexperience will demand assiduity. If I should err then, you must not impute it to the want of attachment; for in such a case I would certainly retire: conceiving as I do, that the...
This I expect you will receive by my collegue General Marshal, who carries with him the last letter of Mr. Tallyrand to the american envoys & their answer. on the day when we sent the latter, I received a letter from the minister, a copy of which & my answer is inclosed. I have not sent these to the Secretary of State, because I have not time to prepare a letter to accompany them. indeed I...
Mr Otis, secretary of the Senate, was kind eno’ to take four letters , of which two were for yourself, & a small box with one or more Watches ; & to promise a delivery of them, into your hands. the box, & some of the letters, were committed to my care by Mr Short; who accompanyed me to Havre, with an intention to embark in the Sophia, for the U States. he had provided every article for the...