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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Revolutionary War" AND Starting date=9 October 1780
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Mr. Thaxter and brother Charles wrote both to you the day before yesterday and as I had no subject to write upon, I did not write But I can now give you an account of our journey. We dined on Monday at Haerlem and arrived at Leyden at Six oclock. We lodged at the Cour de Hollande and saw Mr. Waterhouse that evening. The next day we went to hear a Medicinal lecture by Professor Horn , we saw...
I have this day received two letters from you of the 20th. in one of which you say you would have me attend all the lectures in which Experiments are made, but I shall have to attend two lectures upon law, and therefore shall have no time. As to the lecture upon Greek; there is but one, and the Gentlemen with whom Mr. Thaxter has consulted, think that it is necessary, to have made some...
I yesterday received your’s of the 31st of Jany. in whic you desir’d me to write you a few lines now and then to inform you of my progress in Literature. I have just finish’d Copying a Treatise upon Greek by Mr. Hemsterhuis which our master has been so good as to lend me. It is very rare and there are but very few exemples of it here, and I believe that you would be very much pleas’d with it....
I received a day or two agone the vocabulary which I desir’d you to send, for which I am much obliged to you. Last Thursday I went to hear the Rector Magnificus for last year speak an oration. The Rector for this year is professor Voorda. All the Professors of the university, the Burgomasters and the Schepens of the city were there. Professor Hollebeek (the last years rector) is Profesor in...
The other day I received your letter, of the 12th of this month, in which you ask me whether my Master would choose that I should have Terence with a translation? I believe that he had rather I should not; because when I shall translate him he would desire that I might do it without help. I should be glad if you would bring me Mr. Cerisier’s history of this Country, if you can spare it. There...
I have been wanting to write to you this sometime but there has been nothing worth writing, and even now I know not what to write. We have not long since, heard of the taking of St. Eustatia, it cast a great damp upon the spirits of the dutchmen here; however the latest news from America make up for it for in the English news papers there is paragraph which makes mention that by the latest...
As you may possibly not come here before the 18th I write to know, if I must leave these lodgings at that time, as the month will then be up, and if I stay any longer I must begin another month. I have finish’d Phaedrus’s fables and the lives of Miltiades, Themistocles, Aristides, Pausanias, Cimon, and Lysander; and Am going next upon Alcibiades in Cornelius Nepos, I shall begin upon...
I reciev’d this morning your letter of the 14th. in which you speak of Poetry, and although I have not read much of it, yet I always admired it, very much. I take the Delft Dutch paper to learn to read the language. To day there is a report which I read in it that Admiral Kingsbergen had taken fourteen of the German Transports, but this is only a report. Inclosed is a letter which I reciev’d...
I reciev’d this morning your yesterday’s favour, in which you say, you want to hear of my beginning in Sallust; I have not begun yet but shall soon; but am for the present continuing in Cornelius Nepos. I have got a fair copy of Phaedrus bound, it is My Master’s Translation which if you desire to read, and have time for it, I will send to you. The Vacancy does not begin at the same time,...
Inclosed are some numbers of the lettres Hollandoises. I took them out of thier covers, because I knew they were nothing else, and I could not do them up so well when they were in, however, if you please, I will not take out any more; Mr. Luzac’s this day’s paper is also inclos’d. I wrote to brother Charles by Mr. Thaxter, and to you the night before last, but have not yet reciev’d answers to...
Got up in the morning at about 6 o’clock, and set myself to work; breakfasted at half past seven on tea. At about 1 o’clock Pappa came from the Hague; and ask’d me if I wou’d go to Amsterdam with him; I told him I would, with all my heart. He then told me, that I must put up some clothes and get ready before dinner, and come to dine with him at the Sign of the Golden Lion, all which I did....
Got up in the morning at about 6 o’clock, and set myself to work; breakfasted at half past seven on tea. At about 1 o’clock Pappa came from the Hague; and ask’d me if I wou’d go to Amsterdam with him; I told him I would, with all my heart. He then told me, that I must put up some clothes and get ready before dinner, and come to dine with him at the Sign of the Golden Lion, all which I did....
This morning I got up at about 7 1/2 o’clock breakfasted and at about 9 o’clock Pappa, brother Charles and myself went to the English presbyterian Church and heard a Sermon; the text was in Thessaloniens 1st: 5 Ch: 17th vs. “pray Without ceasing.” We got home at about eleven o clock. As we came out of the Church we found Mr. Jennings in the Coach, he said he had been deterred by his barber. We...
This morning I got up at about 8 o’clock breakfasted, and went to see Mr. Deneufville; we staid there about a half an hour and then went and took a walk; we went to the Western market and walked about 1/4 of an hour and then went to Mr. Guild’s lodgings, but did not find him at home; we then return’d to Pappa’s house. In coming we saw young Mr. Chabanel and spoke to him. At two o’clock we...
This morning after breakfast I went to Mr. Sigourny’s to see about some quill’s. He gave me a paper of the place where he buys his; after that I went and bought some. I din’d at home, Mr. Dennie, Mr. Donalson, and Mr. Sigourny and Mr. Du Barry din’d with us; Mr. Dennie, Mr. Donalson and Mr. Du Barry have just arriv’d here from the West India’s; after dinner I went to see Mr. Greves and Mr....
This morning Mr. Cerisier came here and said that he had read in the Brussels Gazette, that there had been a second action between Lord Cornwallis and General Green, that General Green had been repulsed with the loss of 400 men, but he says he don’t know by which way the news comes. At eleven o’clock I went to take a walk with Mr. Bordly and brother Charles; we met Mr. Le Roi on the Way. He...
This morning Mr. Jennings and Mr. Greves came here with An English Gazette; in which there is the detail of the action between Cornwallis and Green. Cornwallis writes that he has obtain’d a compleat victory; but he has thought proper to run away to Wilmington, General Green is at Camden; Cornwallis has made a Proclamation of pardon to every body (murderers ex­ cepted) but does not mention of...
This morning Mr. Dana, Mr. Thaxter, brother Charles and myself went to Kaa’s, to see Mr. Jennings and Mr. Bordly. We found Mr. Searle there; he has just arriv’d from the Texel; where he has been since saturday. We stay’d sometime there and then went to take a ride; we went out of the Haerlem Port, and rid round by the side of the outer Cingel and came in again into the Leyden Port. After...
This day Mr. Brice, Commodore Gillon, Colo. Searle, Major Jackson, Captn. Coltyzer and Mr. Jennings din’d here; Major Jackson has read in Lloyd’s list an account of an old French sixty four gun Ship’s having been taken by the Jamaica fleet with eighty pieces of brass cannon twenty thousand suits of cloaths and two Millions of Livres on board bound to North America, but this news is not yet...
This morning Pappa, Mr. Dana, brother Charles and I, went to the English presbyterian Church, to hear a Sermon, the text was. “And the times of this ignorance god winked at; but now commandeth all men every where to repent.” Acts 17:30. Mr. Brice din’d with us, after dinner I went alone to Church again; the text was. “And she shall bring forth a son, and thou shalt call his name Jesus: for he...
21Monday June 18th 1781. (Adams Papers)
This morning I went to a bookseller’s to get the Politique Hollandois; Mr. Cerisier din’d here; after dinner I went to Mr. Sigourney’s and drank tea there; after tea I went to see Mr. Greves, he was not at home, but as I was returning I met him in the Street and went to his house with him again, we went to the Coffy house where I left Mr. Greaves, and return’d home at about 9 o’clock. (From...
This day we all din’d at Mr. Deneufville’s with Mr. Cerisier Colo. Searle Mr. Brice Mr. Van Hasseldt, Mr. Le Comte, Commodore Gillon, and Mr. Jennings, after dinner I went to Madam Chabanel’s: after I had been there a little while Mr. Thaxter, Mr. Bromfield, Mr. Guild and brother Charles came there; we went to take a walk out of the town. We walked some ways and then we return’d home and the...
This morning I went to Mr. Sigourney’s to carry the English news Papers to him, din’d at home. After dinner I went with Mr. Dana to take a walk, we went to Commodore Gillon’s, he was not at home, but as we were returning, we met him, and Mr. Dana went to his house again with him, and I return’d home. Chapter 4th. §: 14th. Here follows, on about two and one-quarter pages in the Diary, JQA ’s...
This day I din’d at Madam Chabanel’s, with Mr. Jennings, Captn. Coltyzer Mr. and Madam Hartsinck Mr. Searle Mr. Dana, Mr. Thaxter, Mr. Nickson, Pappa and brother Charles; after dinner I went to see Mr. Bordly, and return’d home at about 9 o’clock. From Guthrie’s grammar (continued from yesterday ) Chap 4th §: 15th. The next two pages in the Diary contain the first half of the section on Dutch...
25Friday June the 22d 1781. (Adams Papers)
This morning I went to Mr. De la Lande and Fynje’s; din’d at home. Mr. Guild din’d Here. After dinner I went to Madam Cha­ banel’s with the coach; she went to take a ride; we went through a village call’d Diem en , and went to Mr. Hartsinck’s country seat. We stay’d there a little while and then return’d in to town to Madam Chabanel’s, Mr. Brailsford came there soon after; and brother Charles...
This morning I went with Mr. Dana to the old Man House to buy a few things. We hear that a courier is arriv’d at the Hague from Madrid who was only eleven days upon the Journey, he brings news that two Dutch fregates commanded by the Captains Oorthius and Melvill had been out to meet the Dutch East India Ships which were coming home; and had done it accordingly, and were returning to Cadix...
Nothing remarkable in the forenoon, Mr. Thaxter din’d at Mr. Sigourney’s; I din’d at home, after dinner I went to take a walk with Mr. Dana; we walk’d someways out of town, in the evening I went to Madam Chabanel’s where I supp’d; got home at about 10 1/2 o’clock. (Continuation from yesterday) From Guthrie’s grammar. Chapter 4th §: 17th. Here follows, on about one page in the Diary, the first...
This morning I went to Mr. Crajenschot’s to get the 20th No. of the Politique Hollandois which comes out every week, there is something in the last No. worth coppying which I shall do at the end of this day’s journal. Din’d at home, after dinner went to see Mr. Bordly and afterwards to Madam Chabanel’s. Got home at about half past nine o’clock. From the Politique Hollandois Chapter 5th. On the...
Nothing remarkable in the forenoon; after dinner I went with Doctor Brown to the New French Coffy House where we found Mr. Greaves and Mr. Brush, we then went and took a long walk and came along by the first bible and there I left the gentlemen and went to see Mr. Bordly, brother Charles came in soon after. We staid there some time and got home at about 8 o’clock. From the Politique Hollandois...
This morning I went to take a walk with Mr. Bordly met in the street two of my old schoolmates; went to Madam Chabanel’s. We did not Stay there long; din’d at home; after dinner brother Charles and I went out of the Leyden Gate, and from thence to the Haerlem Schout with an intention of going to Leyden this day. When we got to the Schout we found the Roof was hir’d and some were obliged to go...
This morning brother Charles and I, went to buy a trunk, when we had got it here we began to pack up our books, which we did before dinner. After dinner Pappa sent for us from the golden Lion. We went there and found Mr. Jennings there. We did not stay there long, but went to Mr. Lynch’s, and went into water with him and some other gentlemen; at eight o’clock our Master came here and we took...
This morning brother Charles and I packed up our trunks, and I went to take leave of our riding master; in the afternoon Pappa came here but stay’d only ten minutes; we went to Mr. Lynch’s at about 4 o’clock; he asked us to go into water with him at 5 o’clock, we told him we would, we went then to take leave of Mr. Luzac. At five o’clock we went again to Mr. Lynch’s and went with him into...
This morning Mr. Cook came here and breakfasted with us and at half past six we went to the boat to go to Amsterdam; we had nothing very remarkable, going to Haerlem, where we arriv’d at half past ten o’clock. We went thro’ the city to the Amsterdam boat, we found that there was place in the Roof; we had one gentleman with us. We arriv’d at Amsterdam at half past one o’clock, brother Charles...
34[July 1781] (Adams Papers)
This morning Pappa and brother Charles and I went to church; din’d at home, Mr. Cook, Mr. Jennings, and another Gentleman din’d with us; brother Charles and I went again to church. After Church Mr. Sigourney, Mr. Ingraham, Mr. Bromfield and Mr. Merrick came here but did not stay here long. From Dr Garths’ works. Epilogue to the Tragedy of Cato. Chapter 9th. The forty-line Epilogue, containing...
35Sunday July the 1st 1781. (Adams Papers)
This morning Pappa and brother Charles and I went to church; din’d at home, Mr. Cook, Mr. Jennings, and another Gentleman din’d with us; brother Charles and I went again to church. After Church Mr. Sigourney, Mr. Ingraham, Mr. Bromfield and Mr. Merrick came here but did not stay here long. From Dr Garths’ works. Epilogue to the Tragedy of Cato. Chapter 9th. The forty-line Epilogue, containing...
36Monday July the 2d 1781. (Adams Papers)
This morning Major Jackson came here; I went to Mr. Crajenschot’s for the Politique Hollandois. At about ten o’clock Pappa set out upon a journey for Paris; We all din’d at home; after dinner, I went to Mr. Sigourney and Ingraham’s but did not Stay there long. I went to Madam Chabanel’s; but found no body but the old lady at home; Mr. Le Roi and young Mr. Chabanel came home. At about half past...
37Tuesday July the 3d 1781. (Adams Papers)
Din’d at home, after dinner Mr. Searle and Major Jackson came here. At about nine o’clock a thunder Storm came up, and lasted till about eleven, it Struck a Windmill, and burnt it to the ground, and would probably have communicated itself to another which was near it, if a very heavy shower of rain had not hinder’d it. From Waller’s works. Chap. 12th. Of The Fear of God. In two Cantoes. Here...
This day being the Anniversary of American Independance, all the Americans din’d together, at a place call’d De Nieuwe Stads Herberg, but brother Charles and I could not go. In the afternoon Brother Charles and I went to the Oude Man Huis to buy some things, We went to Madam Chabanel’s, brother Charles went away soon after and I went to take a walk with the young ladies, I supp’d there, and...
This morning I went to see when the boats go for Utrecht. Mr. Dana and Mr. Thaxter din’d at Mr. Sigourney’s; I din’d at home. After dinner went to see Mr. Greaves; but found only Mr. Brailsford at home; I stay’d there but a little time, and went for Kaa’s; in the way I met Mr. Greaves and Captn. Henzel; and went to take a walk with them out of the Haerlem Porte and down along upon the Dyke; as...
40Friday July the 6th 1781. (Adams Papers)
This morning Dr. Waterhouse came here and told us that Colo. Trumbul had arriv’d in Town. I went to the first Bible to see Mr. Bordly, I found Mr. Trumbel there. I din’d at home. Dr. Waterhouse din’d with us; after dinner Colo. Searle and Major Jackson came here; I went and took a walk with Major Jackson and Mr. Dana. I spent the evening and supp’d at Madam Chabanel’s, got home at about 10...
This morning we pack’d up everything; to go a Journey; At about 11 o’clock Mr. Trumble and Dr. Waterhouse came here; I went with Dr. Waterhouse to show him the way to Madam Chabanel’s; At about half past twelve I set away from our house with Mr. Dana’s servant, and went to the Utrecht Boat; at 1 o’clock we set off; I had for companions A French gentleman and lady, and two Dutch gentlemen; We...
42Sunday July the 8th 1781. (Adams Papers)
This morning Mr. Dana and Mr. Deneufville The day’s entry breaks at this point because the succeeding MS leaf containing p. 113–114 of the Diary volume is missing. This and similar losses of leaves from the same volume containing p. 127–128 and 149–156, affecting entries for 11, 12 July, and 27 July–17 Aug., were noted in the MS by Worthington C. Ford in April 1911. Dana’s Journal, which...
43Monday July the 9th 1781. (Adams Papers)
This morning Mr Deneufville and Mr. Dana went to look for a carriage, I did not go out in the forenoon; din’d at the Inn; after dinner I went to buy some things at the fair, which began here this morning; got home at about six o’clock. From Guthrie’s Grammer. (continued from yesterday) Chapter 4th. §. 21st. N. B. As there are several errors in this description I shall tomorrow point out such...
This morning at about half past nine o’clock Mr. Dana, his servant and I set away from Utrecht, and arriv’d at Ni j megen at about 8 o’clock P.M. the distance, is about 50 Miles; We pass’d along thro’ the province of Utrecht, the land is very bad and gravelly. Nimegen is the last City in the Republic, in the Province of Gelderland; the land in this Province is much better than in that of...
This morning at about six o’clock we set off from Nimegen and arriv’d at about 8 P.M at Hochstrass the distance is about 70 Engh. Miles; We pass’d thro’ Cleves Kleve , Xanten, and Rheimberg Rheinburg , three small unfortified towns, they all belong to the King of Prussia as does Hochstrass Which is the last town in his dominions, in this part of the country. There are but a few houses in...
Dusseldorp a small town strongly fortified on the land side, but open on the river Rhine which we were obliged to cross, (on one of the same machines that I have mention’d yesterday) before we got there, it is in the Dutchy of Burgin Berg and is subject to the King of Prussia. There is a famous cabinet of Paintings here, but as we only stopp’d here to dine, and the cabinet not being then open,...
This morning Mr. Dana and I went to see a gentleman for whom Mr. Dana had letters. He went to take a walk with us about the City which is large, but irregular, very old, and dirty, the streets are very narrow, and the houses are in a decaying situation. We went to see one of the Churches in which they say that the bodies of the three Wise men of the east are interr’d. The priests show their...
This morning at 6 o’clock we set off from Cologne for Coblentz where we arrived at about 6 o’clock P.M. As we could not get horses to go any farther, we stopp’d here, the distance is about 66. English miles. The roads this day were the best we have had since we left Utrecht. Our road, some part of the way was cut through the mountains on the banks of the Rhine; On these mountains we saw the...
This morning at about four o’clock we set off from Coblentz for Francfort, Where we arriv’d at 8 ½ o’clock, the distance is 84 English Miles; All the way, the roads are mountainous till you get within about 10 Miles of Frankfort, and then you come upon a very large plain. The roads till the plain are in general very bad; but the soil is good, and cultivated in some places. On this plain we saw...
This morning we enquired something about this city: It is situated upon the river Meyn and is call’d Francfort upon the Meyn to distinguish it from another city in Germany call’d Francfort upon the Oder. It is an imperial city, govern’d by its own magistrates: they Choose every year a new burgermaster or mayor. The dominant religion in this city is Lutheran. Catholics and Jews are tolerated,...