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That The Minister of the French Republic be informed that the President considers the U. States as bound pursuant to positive assurances, given in conformity to the laws of neutrality, to effectuate the restoration of, or to make compensation for, prizes which shall have been made of any of the parties at war with France subsequent to the fifth day of June last by privateers fitted out of...
August 3. 1793 The foregoing rules having been considered by us at several meetings, and being now unanimously approved, they are submitted to the President of the United States. DS , in George Taylor, Jr.’s writing, DLC:GW ; copy (letterpress copy), DLC : Jefferson Papers; LB , DLC:GW ; Df , in Alexander Hamilton’s writing, DLC : Jefferson Papers; copy, DNA : RG 46, Third Congress, 1793–1795,...
By the William Penn I wrote you a Letter and inclosed you a Number of News-Papers—to the Care of our Friend Doctor Rush—but as I suppose this Letter may reach You before that Ship arrives, I embrace the Oportunity to inform You that Valenciennes is now actually taken by the combined Armies. The Letter I then wrote to you expresses a Doubt of its being taken at all—it was written the Evening...
I was duly honor’d by the receipt of your letter of the 19 past & would have answer’d it in course had Mr Moore been in town It was only Yesterday I could go into the business with him, & upon going to examine the house found a Woman of the name of Jackson with a family of Children in it—she told me her Husband was gone to Boston & that she did not expect his return in less than three weeks,...
At a Meeting of the Secretary of State The Secretary of the Treasury The Secretary at War and the Attorney General at the . The following rules were agreed to— I The original arming and equipping of vessels in the Ports of the UStates, by any of the belligerent parties, for Military service offensive or defensive, is deemed unlawful. II Equipments of Merchant vessels by either of the...
I find on a second reading of your letter yesterday, that I mistook the expressions contained in it, and was led to give to it a meaning which is entirely foreign to it. I hasten to correct my error, and to assure you, that I am extremely pained at the harsh inference I was led to draw and to express. I feel myself bound without loss of time to apologize to you for it, and to declare to you my...
That the Minister of the French Republic be informed that the President considers the UStates as bound pursuant to positive assurances, given in conformity to the laws of neutrality, to effectuate the restoration of, or to make compensation for, prizes which shall have been made of any of the parties at war with France subsequent to the fifth day of June last by privateers fitted out of their...
1. The original arming and equipping of vessels in the ports of the United States by any of the belligerent parties, for military service offensive or defensive, is deemed unlawful. 2. Equipments of merchant vessels by either of the belligerent parties in the ports of the United States, purely for the accommodation of them as such, is deemed lawful. 3. Equipments in the ports of the United...
That The Minister of the French Republic be informed that the President considers the UStates as bound pursuant to positive assurances; given in conformity to the laws of neutrality, to effectuate the restoration of, or to make compensation for, prizes which shall have been made of any of the parties at war with France subsequent to the fifth day of June last by privateers fitted out of their...
Your letter of yesterday I received last night. The contents of it surprize me. Could you imagine that the menace of an appeal to the people, would induce me to swerve from what I thought my public duty? If you believe that it will be of any advantage to you, I have no objection to your making it, whenever you think proper. The President has put into my hands your letter, in order that I may...