Alexander Hamilton Papers
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From Alexander Hamilton to Andrew G. Fraunces, 3 August 1793

To Andrew G. Fraunces1

Philadelphia, August 3, 1793.

Sir,

Your letter of yesterday I received last night. The contents of it surprize me. Could you imagine that the menace of an appeal to the people, would induce me to swerve from what I thought my public duty?

If you believe that it will be of any advantage to you, I have no objection to your making it, whenever you think proper.

The President has put into my hands your letter,2 in order that I may give him information upon the subject of it. This will be done as soon as more urgent official concerns will permit; and his decision will of course govern me.

I do not think it proper to notice to you any thing in that letter, except the part by which you seem to insinuate, that some sinister motives, known only to a few, have produced my refusal to pay for the present, the warrants. If this be your meaning, it is incumbent upon you, and I call upon you to declare what those motives are, and the evidence you have of them.

I am, Sir, your humble servant,

Alexander Hamilton.

Mr. Andrew G. Fraunces,
(to be left with his Father,3 at the Presidents’.)

Fraunces, An Appeal description begins [Andrew G. Fraunces], An Appeal to the Legislature of the United States, and to the Citizens Individually, of the Several States, Against the Conduct of the Secretary of the Treasury. By Andrew G. Fraunces, Citizen of the State of New-York, Late in the Treasury of the United States. “E tenebris elucidit lux.” Printed for Andrew G. Fraunces, Esq. (n.p., 1793). description ends , 15.

1For background to this letter, see Fraunces to H, May 16, June 10, July 1, August 2, 1793; H to Fraunces, May 18, July 2, August 2, first letter of August 3, 1793.

2Fraunces to George Washington, July 30, 1793 (ALS, RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters, 1790–1799, National Archives). This letter is printed in Fraunces, An Appeal description begins [Andrew G. Fraunces], An Appeal to the Legislature of the United States, and to the Citizens Individually, of the Several States, Against the Conduct of the Secretary of the Treasury. By Andrew G. Fraunces, Citizen of the State of New-York, Late in the Treasury of the United States. “E tenebris elucidit lux.” Printed for Andrew G. Fraunces, Esq. (n.p., 1793). description ends , 8–11.

3Samuel Fraunces, Washington’s steward.

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