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Though I can not find a pretext, valid enough to exculpate me, in interrupting your Excellency’s serious occupations, however I am inclined to believe, that ÿou will excuse it after a silence of seven months, in the persuasion, that a due sense, of what everÿ American owes to your merits and character, with which since more than a dozen years I have been acquainted, being a witness of a great...
At a Meeting of the Secretary of State The Secretary of the Treasury The Secretary at War and the Attorney General at the . The following rules were agreed to— I The original arming and equipping of vessels in the Ports of the UStates, by any of the belligerent parties, for Military service offensive or defensive, is deemed unlawful. II Equipments of Merchant vessels by either of the...
That The Minister of the French Republic be informed that the President considers the UStates as bound pursuant to positive assurances; given in conformity to the laws of neutrality, to effectuate the restoration of, or to make compensation for, prizes which shall have been made of any of the parties at war with France subsequent to the fifth day of June last by privateers fitted out of their...
I find on a second reading of your letter yesterday, that I mistook the expressions contained in it, and was led to give to it a meaning which is entirely foreign to it. I hasten to correct my error, and to assure you, that I am extremely pained at the harsh inference I was led to draw and to express. I feel myself bound without loss of time to apologize to you for it, and to declare to you my...
Your letter of yesterday I received last night. The contents of it surprize me. Could you imagine that the menace of an appeal to the people, would induce me to swerve from what I thought my public duty? If you believe that it will be of any advantage to you, I have no objection to your making it, whenever you think proper. The President has put into my hands your letter, in order that I may...
The french fleet from the Chesapeak arrived here yesterday, and are in the north river above the Battery. The Ambuscade also arrived last Evening and her accounts, confirmed by those of many Spectators of the combat, have no doubt of the Flight of the English Frigate. (You will have seen in our news papers, an invitation for a meeting in the Fields to address Mr. Genest who is daily expected...
Fresh occurrences, but communicated thro’ private channels, make it indispensable that the general principles which have already been the subject of discussion should be fixed, & made known for the government of all concerned, as soon as it can be done with propriety. To fix rules on substantial ground, conformably to treaties & the Laws of nations, is extremely desireable. The verdict of the...
Motives of Justice, friendship & candour induce me to send the enclosed for your perusal. Let me know the truth of this matter. What answer is proper to be given to it, and by whom. The writer is urgent to receive one, having called once or twice since the delivery of it, for This purpose. I am &c. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. At the bottom of the page of the letter book...
I have received your Letter of the 30th. of July. The matter of it being of a serious nature I have directed the Secretary of the Treasury to report to me in writing how far the Representation is founded in fact and the reasons on his part for declining the payment of the Warrants. But I do not expect that he can, consistently with objects of a more general concern, make his report ’till some...
Fresh occurrences, but communicated through private channels, make it indispensable that the general principles which have already been the subject of discussion, should be fixed & made known for the government of all concerned as soon as they can be, with propriety. To fix rules on substantial and impartial ground, comformably to treaties and the Laws of Nations, is extremely desirable. The...