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In the returns from the Treasury Dept. which will be laid before you in pursuance of your Directions founded on the order of the Senate of the United States of May 7. 1792 there will be wanting an Account of the Contingent Expences of the Treasury Department, for Wood, rent and other payment, which have not been considered as forming a Part of the Expence of any particular Office, but which...
Th: Jefferson has the honor to inform the President that in a Madrid gazette of Sep. 14. is an article of Namur Aug. 23. which states circumstantially the capture of M. de la Fayette, and that he was carried from the place to Antwerp. it says that his intention had been to pass in the rear of the Austrian army, but ran foul of a picquet near Rochfort. there were 17 or 18. officers altogether....
From the habits I have ever been accustomed to consider you in, I have ventured to address you on matters of the utmost importance to this territory and also affects the general government. That the Indians have not always been treated with justice by the whites is an undoubted truth: but since the treaties of New York and Holston with the Creeks and Cherokees I neither know nor have heard of...
Letter not found: from Henry Lee, 27 Oct. 1792. Henry Knox wrote Lee on 3 Nov. 1792 explaining that GW “has directed me to acknowledge the receipt of your Excellency’s Letter to him of the 27th ultimo.” For Knox’s letter to Lee, see Knox to GW, 3 Nov. 1792, n.1 .
The French post arrived here the day before yesterday & brought some of the mails which have been so long detained on the frontiers. I received thereby several letters from M. Morris, from whom I mentioned to you in my last I was waiting with impatience to hear. It does not appear that he has seen the commissaries as I wished in order to satisfy himself that they had given credit to the U.S....
Notwithstanding the immense length & prolixity of my letter of yesterday it wd. have been continued if I had not been interrupted & detained until the hour of the post. You desire me to consider well before hand as to the obligations, whether I would wish to come to a settlement previously with the ministry, in fixing the value &c. If as you suppose the obligations are only three, nothing more...
We are still in the state, mentioned to you in my last, of certainty as to the retiring of the combined armies, and of conjecture as to the cause of it. The issue of the military operations has been the direct opposite of what I counted on in my prolix letter No. 111.—but one of the leading circumstances which I then mentioned seems more than ever probable; namely the scission between Vienna...
The statement relatively to the Cherokees shall be made tomorrow, or next day at furthest —The intelligence received, this afternoon from Governor Blount renders alterations necessary. I submit this intelligence to the President in Governor Blounts Letter of the 7th instant, received at 3 oClock P.M. , together with certain Letters which I have written in consequence, to the Governors of South...
Th: Jefferson has the honor to inform the President that in a Madrid gazette of Sep. 14. is an article of Namur Aug. 23. which states circumstantially the capture of M. de la Fayette, and that he was carried from that place to Antwerp. It says that his intention had been to pass in the rear of the Austrian army, but ran foul of a picquet near Rochfort. There were 17 or 18. officers...
An inquiry into the mineral productions of this country, appeared to me an object of so much importance, that I was induced to take the liberty of writing to you on the business from Boston, I think in June, and had the honour of receiving your reply in this City. The motives that occasioned my former letter (& the only excuse I can plead for taking this freedom) were similar to what dictate...