You
have
selected

  • Date

    • 1786-11-29

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 7

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 5

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Date="1786-11-29"
Results 1-9 of 9 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
129th. (Adams Papers)
No appearance yet of any body to prevent the sitting of the court; the reports have not yet ceased however. Had tea at my chamber this evening, and several of the club past the evening with me. Lovell, a classmate of mine, is half crazy, at hearing so much news. He wants to be doing something, and is determined by some means or other to fight the insurgents. He says he is no politician, he was...
The tumultuous Conduct of many People in New England which is mentioned in your obliging Letter of the 3 d of October, does not I hope arise from any Competitions for the Government. If the People who wish for Hancock, or those who prefer Bowdoin, those who vote for Sullivan—or such as desire Langden, are Capable of exciting such kinds of Unhappiness Discontent, and Convulsions in order to...
3[Diary entry: 29 November 1786] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday 29th. Mercury at 17 in the Morning—23 at Noon and 22 at Night. Wind Northerly and rather fresh in the forenoon and about So. Et. afterwards—very raw and cold all day with appears. of Snow. Towards Night a mixture of it and hail fell but not enough to cover the ground. Rid to the Plantations at the Ferry, Dogue run, and Muddy hole and to the Ditchers. At the first G. Washington...
Your letters of the 18th by the Packet, & 19th by the Post, are both at hand—The Birds were landed yesterday. A Patridge died on the passage. If Monsr Campion’s information is to be depended on, he had no letter from the Marquis de la Fayette or any other character in France, for me; nothing confidential therefore could have been disclosed by the loss of his pocket book, unless it was...
The issue of the free navigation of the Mississippi had long occupied JM’s mind, and his concern had been aroused in the summer of 1786 when Monroe had kept him informed of the proceedings in Congress on the Jay-Gardoqui negotiations in an almost continuous stream of letters. By August JM was deeply disturbed at what the consequences would be of Jay’s negotiating away the Confederacy’s rights...
I have the honor of inclosing you a copy of a letter from the Count de Vergennes. It will shew you that such orders have been given by the Controller general as leave a free exportation to the articles for which I lately forwarded you the passeports. I am Sir, with the most perfect consideration your very humble Servant, PrC ( DLC ); in Short’s hand, including signature; at foot of text:...
My letters which pass thro’ the post office either of this country or of England being all opened, I send thro’ that channel only such as are very indifferent in their nature. This is not the character, my dear madam of those I write to you. The breathings of a pure affection would be profaned by the eye of a Commis of the poste . I am obliged then to wait for private conveiances. I wrote to...
[ Cette 29 Nov. 1786. Recorded in SJL as received 9 Dec. 1786. not Found.]
I have the pleasure of committing to Colo. Smith’s care for you, a letter of Mrs. Cosway, and a book of songs of her composition . She has written twice to you before, since receiving your first and only one thru my hands; and having no answer, is anxious least they should have missd their way tho I addressed them in the manner you directed. I am sorry to learn from Colo. S. that his last...