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A calm. The vessel rolling: the wind freshning towards Night. We hope for a speedy passage up the Channel. Tuesday a fine wind but squally. We have seen land supposed to be Dover cliffs. AA ’s chronology here and in the next entry is confused, which is perhaps not surprising in view of her having slept only four hours between Saturday the 17th and Tuesday the 20th (which was in fact the day...
I have rec’d your Letters of the fifth and ninth, and at last my Trunks are arrived, so that I am now collected into one Spot. I shall. be much obliged to you, to settle my Account, according to your own Judgment as soon as possible. I would not charge any Thing wrong, nor willingly any thing that shall appear to be so. Yet I ought in Justice to charge what is right. As to my coming to Paris,...
I have the Honour of your Letters of the 27 of June and 4. July, and Should advise your Excellency to present the C. de Mercy, a Copy of the Instruction as you propose. By the Length of Time, We have been left without Information respecting foreign Affairs, and by other Circumstances, there are greater Divisions among our Countrymen, respecting these as well as their Finances, than are...
I have rec’d your’s of the 13 th and 16 th: the last contains the most agreeable News I have heard a long time.— If M rs: Adams should arrive, I believe it will be the most prudent thing she can do, to purchase as strong and decent a Coach of four Places, as can be had for 150 Guineas, in this she may come to the Hague, and go in it with me to Paris if I should have occasion to go there—I...
ALS : Library of Congress; copy: Massachusetts Historical Society I have the Honour of your Letters of the 27 of June and 4. July, and Should advise your Excellency to present the C. de Mercy, a Copy of the Instruction as you propose. By the Length of Time, We have been left without Information respecting foreign Affairs, and by other Circumstances, there are greater Divisions among our...
Two ALS : American Philosophical Society I ought to begin my request by asking pardon for troubling you—but I trust you will be pleased to pardon me when you are rightly informed of my case— In Octor. 1778. there was a large number of French Prisoners Released from confinement at New York, and Landed at this place in order to be sent to Boston— They were in the most destressed circumstances...
Great and Good Sir, After the multitude of addresses which have been presented to you in the course and at the conclusion of the late war, it would be needless for an obscure individual to repeat the voice of admiration and gratitude which has resounded from every part of America for the eminent services which you have rendered to this country. It shall be my part, Sir, to ask your acceptance...