George Washington Papers
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To George Washington from George Clinton, 1 July 1779

From George Clinton

Pokeepsie [N.Y.] 1st July 1779

Dear Sir

I have recd Your Excellency’s Letter of the 28st Ulto1—I have already given Colo. Pawling Directions to make every necessary Preparati on and be in perfect Readiness to march with the Troops under his Command on the shortest Notice and that his Men might be properly provided[.] I have barely intimated to him in Confidence that he was to form a Junction and continue with the Troops destined for the Western Expedition—As soon as I shall be advised of the Period most proper for him to march I will give him Orders agreable to your Excellency’s Request.2

From a Letter I recd from Colo. Hay I have Reason to apprehend that the Want of Money in the Qur Mr’s Departmt may prevent his supplying this Detachmt with what may be necessary to enable them to move in Season.3 I am.

Df, NNPM.

1Clinton is referring to GW’s first letter to him of that date.

2For these marching orders, see Clinton to Albert Pawling, 5 Aug. (Hastings and Holden, Clinton Papers, description begins Hugh Hastings and J. A. Holden, eds. Public Papers of George Clinton, First Governor of New York, 1777–1795, 1801–1804. 10 vols. 1899–1914. Reprint. New York, 1973. description ends 5:181–83).

3Clinton is referring to a letter to him from Lt. Col. Udny Hay, written at Fishkill, N.Y., on 28 June. It reads: “I beg leave to refer your Excellency to the enclosed; without your complyance with its contents I cannot see how the intended expedition can be fitted out in proper time. I make no doubt of being able to repay the sum you are pleased to lend (for which Capt. Harrison’s receipt will be a sufficient voucher) in three weeks at furthest” (Hastings and Holden, Clinton Papers, description begins Hugh Hastings and J. A. Holden, eds. Public Papers of George Clinton, First Governor of New York, 1777–1795, 1801–1804. 10 vols. 1899–1914. Reprint. New York, 1973. description ends 5:104). The enclosure was a letter of the same date from Q.M. Gen. Nathanael Greene to Clinton reporting Hay “in immediate want of about 100,000 dollars” (Hastings and Holden, Clinton Papers, description begins Hugh Hastings and J. A. Holden, eds. Public Papers of George Clinton, First Governor of New York, 1777–1795, 1801–1804. 10 vols. 1899–1914. Reprint. New York, 1973. description ends 5:103).

Clinton replied to Greene on 29 June in a letter that in part reads: “I am favored with your Letter of yesterday and find myself particularly unhappy in not being able to comply with your Request. I have no authority to draw money from the Treasury and whatever weight my advice might have with the Treasurer on ordinary occasions I cannot with any Propriety make the Draft you require, as I know a Compliance with it wo’d be contrary to the Tenor of his Oath. If my Credit or private Property (tho at present I have by me but an inconsiderable sum when compared to your Wants) can be of any use for the public Service you may freely command them” (Hastings and Holden, Clinton Papers, description begins Hugh Hastings and J. A. Holden, eds. Public Papers of George Clinton, First Governor of New York, 1777–1795, 1801–1804. 10 vols. 1899–1914. Reprint. New York, 1973. description ends 5:103–4). Clinton sent his letter to Greene via Hay, whom Clinton also wrote on 29 June: “Even if I had authority to draw money from the Treasury, I do not imagine there is now in it, in current Money, near the sum mentioned by Genl. Greene in his Letter to me, the greatest Part of it consisting of the Proceeds of the late Tax, which is chiefly of the Emissions called out of Circulation” (Hastings and Holden, Clinton Papers, description begins Hugh Hastings and J. A. Holden, eds. Public Papers of George Clinton, First Governor of New York, 1777–1795, 1801–1804. 10 vols. 1899–1914. Reprint. New York, 1973. description ends 5:104).

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