George Washington Papers
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From George Washington to Peter Hog, 6 September 1755

To Peter Hog

[Fredericksburg, 6 September 1755]

To Captain Peter Hogg.
Sir,

By the new Appointment and Regulations, you stand as eldest Captain in the Virginia Regiment; which I hope will be agreeable: I have therefore sent you your Commission, and orders to Relieve Captain Lewis; which I expect will be immediately complied with, his presence at Fredericksburgh being much wanted.

As these kind of Orders will admit of no Delay; I must again repeat, that I expect your immediate compliance; and that no Excuse shall occasion the least Delay. I am, Sir,

G:W.

LB, DLC:GW.

The date of Peter Hog’s commission as a captain in the Virginia forces, 9 Mar. 1754, made him the senior captain among those being named in GW’s new regiment. Hog did not arrive to relieve Maj. Andrew Lewis at Fort Dinwiddie on Jackson’s River in Augusta County until 21 Sept. The year before, in 1754, Hog accompanied GW on the expedition that ended with the capitulation at Fort Necessity. Remaining with the force after GW resigned at the end of Oct. 1754, Captain Hog spent the early months of the new year on the Eastern Shore of Chesapeake Bay recruiting men for the anticipated campaign against Fort Duquesne (Dinwiddie to Hog, 19 Jan. 1755, in Brock, Dinwiddie Papers description begins R. Alonzo Brock, ed. The Official Records of Robert Dinwiddie, Lieutenant-Governor of the Colony of Virginia, 1751–1758. 2 vols. Richmond, 1883–84. description ends , 1:470–72). During the campaign, Braddock put Hog in charge of a detachment to protect the workmen building the “pensilva Road” (Hog to GW, 27 Jan. 1756), under the direction of James Burd, from Conococheague Creek west of Shippensburg across to the road being built for Braddock’s army from Fort Cumberland at Wills Creek up toward Fort Duquesne. Upon hearing on 18 July of Braddock’s defeat, Hog and Burd fled with their charges from the unfinished road to Fort Cumberland, abandoning equipment and supplies along the way (Nixon, James Burd description begins Lily Lee Nixon. James Burd: Frontier Defender, 1726–1793. Philadelphia, 1941. description ends , 29–32). Hog was not among the officers present at Williamsburg on 3 Sept. when GW organized his new regiment, probably because he was out recruiting. See Dinwiddie to Captains of Virginia Forces, 25 Aug. 1755, in Brock, Dinwiddie Papers description begins R. Alonzo Brock, ed. The Official Records of Robert Dinwiddie, Lieutenant-Governor of the Colony of Virginia, 1751–1758. 2 vols. Richmond, 1883–84. description ends , 2:177. Hog remained at Fort Dinwiddie from Sept. 1755 until after GW ordered him on 21 July 1756 to take charge of building a chain of forts along the frontier below Dinwiddie. While still in command at Fort Dinwiddie, Hog took his company on Andrew Lewis’s unsuccessful Sandy Creek expedition against the Shawnee towns, in Feb. and Mar. 1756. The correspondence between GW and Hog reflects GW’s growing impatience with the way Hog was managing his company, which culminated in GW’s letter of 24 July 1757 relieving Hog of his command. Two lieutenants whom GW assigned to Hog’s company, William Stark and George Fraser, resigned from the Virginia Regiment rather than serve with Hog, and a third, Thomas Bullitt, was soon begging GW to transfer him to another company. Shortly after GW dismissed Hog, Dinwiddie made him captain of a company of rangers in Augusta County, at which GW wrote Dinwiddie, on 24 Oct. 1757, that “Capt. Hogg is the most unfit person in the world, to raise and command a company of Rangers.” When GW first sent him to Fort Dinwiddie, Hog was unfamiliar with Augusta County, but he remained in the county after he left the regiment and practiced law there from 1760 until his death in 1782. If Peter Hog was born in Scotland in 1703, as has often been stated, he was older by nearly 30 years than GW and most of his fellow officers in the Virginia Regiment. He seems to have arrived in Virginia in the mid–1740s with two brothers, Thomas and Walter.

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