Alexander Hamilton Papers
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From Alexander Hamilton to Oliver Wolcott, Junior, 5 August 1795

To Oliver Wolcott, Junior

New York Aug 5. 1795

Dr. Sir

I have received yours of 3d instant.1 You make no mention of having received one from me inclosing another for the Attorney General2 in which I tell him that I will attend the cause which involves the question respecting direct taxes3 when notified of the time it will come on.

The silence of your letter makes me fear it may have miscarried.

I do not wonder at what you tell me of the author of a certain piece.4 That man is too cunning to be wise. I have been so much in the habit of seeing him mistaken that I hold his opinion cheap.

Yrs. truly

A Hamilton

Oliver Wolcott Esq

ALS, Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford.

1Letter not found.

2H’s letter to William Bradford has not been found, but see Bradford to H, August 4, 1795.

3For information on the Carriage Tax case (Hylton v United States), see 3 Dallas, U.S. Reports description begins A. J. Dallas, Reports of Cases Ruled and Adjudged in the Several Courts of the United States and of Pennsylvania, Held at the Seat of the Federal Government. Vol. III, Second Edition. Edited, With Notes and References to Later Decisions, by Frederick C. Brightly (New York and Albany, 1882). description ends , 171–84, and the Goebel, Law Practice description begins Julius Goebel, Jr., ed., The Law Practice of Alexander Hamilton: Documents and Commentary (New York and London, 1964–). description ends , forthcoming volumes. See also Tench Coxe to H, January 14, 19, 1795; H to Coxe, January 26, 1795; Bradford to H, July 2, August 4, 1795; Edmund Randolph to H, July 21, 1795; Wolcott to H, July 28, 1795.

4At the end of this sentence in the MS an asterisk appears. At the bottom of this letter Wolcott wrote: “*Tench Coxe author of a piece signed Juriscola. O W.” Coxe wrote four articles which he signed “Juricola” (rather than “Juriscola”). These articles, which are entitled “An Examination of the pending Treaty with Great Britain” and are addressed “To the President of the United States of America,” appeared in The Philadelphia Gazette and Universal Daily Advertiser, July 31, August 4, 8, 12, 1795.

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