Benjamin Franklin Papers
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https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Franklin/01-20-02-0063

From Benjamin Franklin to Jonathan Williams, Sr., 9 March 1773

To Jonathan Williams, Sr.

ALS (letterbook draft): Library of Congress

London, Mar. 9. 1773

Dear Cousin,

I received your Favour of Dec. 27. with the Cask of Sowns and Tongues, which came very opportunely at the Beginning of Lent, and are very agreable to me. Mr. Stanley and your Brother have the others.9 Accept my best Thanks.

I received also the Bill of Exchange for £271 for which have credited your Account. And shall soon send you a State of the whole from my Books.

I shall be satisfy’d with any Measures you take in the Affair of Hall, knowing you will act for the best. You may give the whole Sum recover’d to my Sister.2 I have not now time to write as I would to Jonathan. Let him know that I recd. his of Dec. 26. and that I lately sent him the other 3 of Priestly’s Book. I inclose Henry’s Indentures. If you find it suitable, I could wish the Boy bound to his new Business.3 My Love to Cousin Grace and all yours. I hear her Father is still living.4 My Respects to him. I am ever, Your affectionate Uncle

B Franklin

Jonath Williams, Esqr

[Note numbering follows the Franklin Papers source.]

9Cod’s tongues and sounds, or air bladders, were delicacies of the period; the others who received them were John Stanley, the blind organist and former teacher of Josiah Williams, and Jonathan’s brother John, the customs inspector. Lent began that year on Feb. 24.

1Sheppard on King, listed above, X, 358; see also Jour., p. 47, and Ledger, p. 39.

2BF is answering Williams’ letter above, XIX, 290–1, which we should have dated Nov. 12; see BF to Williams below, July 7. For Samuel Hall’s debt and Jane Mecom’s windfall see the references in Williams to BF above, Feb. 15.

3For the books see above, XIX, 200; the apprenticing of Henry Walker is discussed in his mother’s letter to BF below, June 20.

4William Harris, if he was indeed still alive, must have been in his eighties; he married Grace Williams’ mother in 1712. Above, I, lvii.

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