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    • White, Thomas Willis
    • Jefferson, Thomas

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="White, Thomas Willis" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
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I hope you will excuse intrusion in a stranger.—Believing I might obtain correct information from you, I have taken the liberty to enquire whether you could advise me to the publication of my work, which you think there would be, a probability of succeeding by subscription. Having been regularly bred to the Printing-Business, and believing myself to be perfectly adequate to the task, I should...
The state of my health permits me, but with pain, to write even the short acknolegement of a letter. I am moreover too much unacquainted with the general taste to know what would suit it , or to judge what book would be of ready sale; and I should be sorry to advise an unprofitable one. there is a valuable history of England Baxter’s, which I have long wished reprinted here. it was too...
Three years ago, I had the pleasure of receiving from yourself a letter in answer to one from me, respecting some publication which you thought might succeed with the public. I now have the pleasure of acquainting you that I have procured printing apparatus and am ready to execute any work which may be committed to my charge. The work which you then spoke of, is too large for my funds. I beg...
In answer to your letter of Nov. 29. I can say no more than I did to that of Jan. 26. 20. I know no book particularly interesting to us to be reprinted here but Baxter’s history of England which I then mentioned. it’s principles were too republican for the meridian of London, and it therefore has never been reprinted there as far as I have been able to learn . it would make 3. or 4. vols 8 vo...
Before me I have your esteemed favour of the 11th inst.—Since you know of no other work smaller than Baxters History of England, which you would recommend a republication of, I have to beg of you to endeavour to procure for me the Copy formerly belonging to yourself, so soon as you possibly can make it practicable.—I will then immediately print one octavo form, which shall be a true specimen...
The copy of Baxter’s history which is in the Library of Congress cannot possibly be borrowed. it is against the law establishing their library. but you might get it from London, within 4. months, thro’ any importing merchant or bookseller of Richmond. There is a new work in Law published in England, which will be of extensive sale in this country among the Lawyers. it is a Digest of Coke...
I at length am able to state to you that I am in possession of Thomas’s Digest of Coke and Littleton.—This is the work recommended by yourself as worthy of patronage—and, indeed, so far, as I am able to judge, I unhesitatingly pronounce it the greatest law-work I ever looked at. I have made a calculation of the expense of Printing, Binding and Paper, and find that to print it as it might be...
I must beg to be excused from writing the prospectus for your edn of Thomas’s Co Littleton. I have made it a point never to be the recommender of books to the public. it would be presumption in any case but especially in that of a book addressed to a learned profession as that of the law so entirely capable of judging for themselves . I suggested, at your request, this book as one the ability...
I take infinite pleasure in presenting you with a copy of a small work, entitled Garnetts Lectures.—It is but a few days since I passed it through the press.—and I still waiting for a plate which I expect on from Philadelphia, designed as a frontispiece, before the work is in as complete a state as I wish to see it. If on perusing it, you should find its merits such as would draw from your...
Since writing you on Friday last, I have had the pleasure of receiving a third recommendation to the volume I sent you,—I have struck off these three in the form of a little pamphlet, in order to lay them on the counter of the Book stores in the City until I am able to ob t ain a few more, so as to place them in all the copies which remain unbound. I enclose you a copy of them, not knowing...
I have duly recieved your letter of the 3 d proposing for my acceptance a book, on which you wish me to give an opinion, which you should be at liberty to publish. this I invariably decline. I have neither the talents, the taste, nor the time for the office of a Reviewer of books. such an undertaking, if executed with fidelity to the publick, would require me to read the book with critical...