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The President of the United States has this day approved and signed two acts which originated in the Senate; one, ’An act to incorporate the subscribers to the Bank of the United States;’ the other, ’An act regulating the number of Representatives to be chosen by the states of Kentucky and Vermont.’ Printed Source--Senate Journal.
Certain matters touching the public good requiring that the Senate shall be convened on Friday the 4th Instant, I have desired their attendance, as I do yours by these Presents, at the Senate Chamber in Philadelphia on that day, then and there to receive and deliberate on such Communications as shall be made to you on my part.— DLC : Papers of George Washington.
The President of the United States has this day approved and signed a resolution, which originated in the Senate, requesting that the President of the United States would cause to be communicated to the National Assembly of France the sense which Congress have of the tribute paid to the memory of Benjamin Franklin.” Printed Source--Senate Journal.
The President of the United States has this day approved and signed the following acts: “An act to amend an act for establishing the temporary and permanent seat of the government of the United States;” and “An act making an appropriation for the purpose therein mentioned.” Printed Source--Senate Journal.
The President of the United States has this day approved and signed “the resolve for establishing the mint;” and “the resolve requesting the President of the United States to cause an estimate to be laid before Congress of the lands not claimed by the Indians.” Printed Source--Senate Journal.
The President of the United States has this day approved and signed the following acts which originated in the Senate: “An act to continue in force the act therein mentioned, and to make further provision for the payment of pensions to invalids, and for the support of light-houses, beacons, buoys, and public piers;” and “An act for granting lands to the inhabitants and settlers at Vincennes,...
The Senate of the United States have received with the highest satisfaction the assurance of public prosperity contained in your Speech to both Houses: the multiplied blessings of providence have not escaped our notice or failed to excite our gratitude. The benefits which flow from a restoration of public and private confidence are conspicuous and important and the pleasure with which we...
Captain John of Harvard in the Massachusetts, has been recommended to me, by so many respectable characters, and in such handsome terms, that I cannot refuse his request of a Line to the President of the United States in his favour. He has the merit of long and early Services, though he is said to have been lately unfortunate. As his application is entirely out of my Department, and to a Judge...
At twelve o’Clock, agreeably to appointment, the Senate waited on the President at his House and presented the following Address. Accept, Sir, the thanks of the Senate for your Speech delivered to both Houses of Congress at the opening of the session. Your reelection to the chief magistracy of the United States gives us sincere pleasure. We consider it as an event every way propitious to the...
I would thank you for giving the papers herewith sent a perusal—and for the result of it.— I am now deliberating on the measure proper & necessary to be taken with respect to Mr. G——t and wish for aid in so doing; the critical state of things making me more than usually anxious to decide right in the present case.— None but the heads of departments are privy to these papers, which I pray may...
Resolution of the Trustees of the. Sinkg. Fund. At a Meeting of the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund on the thirtieth day of May 1794. Present, The Vice President of the United States, The Secretary of the Treasury, The Secretary of State, The Attorney General. The Secretary of the Treasury having informed the board that there was in the Treasury the sum of one hundred thousand Dollars to be...
I have not been able to give the papers herewith enclosed, more than a hasty reading;—returning them, with out delay, that you may offer the perusal of them to whomsoever you shall think proper.— The picture drawn in them, of the Genevese, is realy interesting & affecting.—The proposition of transplanting the members, entire, of the University of that place, to America, with the requisition of...
We receive with pleasure your speech to the two Houses of Congress. In it we perceive renewed proofs of that vigilant and paternal concern for the prosperity, honor, and happiness of our country, which has uniformly distinguished your past administration. Our anxiety arising from the licentious and open resistance to the laws in the western counties of Pennsylvania, has been increased by the...
The Secretary of State does himself the honor of requesting the favor of an acknowledgment that the enclosed summons has got safe to hand. United States March 3. 1795. The President of the United States to the Vice President of the United States, and President of the Senate Certain matters touching the public good, requiring that the Senate shall be convened on Monday the 8th of June next; you...
The inclosed Letters No. 6. 7. 8 and 9, especially the last, contain Information of so much Importance that, although they are written in great confidential Freedom from a Son to a Father, I think it my Duty to transmit them to you. I beg the favour of having them returned to me at your Leisure by the Post. The unnatural Effervescence against the Treaty which broke out in Boston has made...
I have received your favor of the 10th. inst. with its enclosures.—They contain a great deal of interesting matter;—and No. 9 discloses much important information, and political foresight.—For the proof of your kindness, and confidence, I pray you to accept my best, & most cordial thanks.— Mr. J. Adams, your son, must not think of retiring from the walk he is now in:—his prospects, if he...
It is with peculiar satisfaction that we are informed by your Speech to the two Houses of Congress, that the long, and expensive war in which we have been engaged with the Indians North west of the Ohio, is in a situation to be finally terminated; and though we view with concern the danger of an interruption of the peace so recently confirmed with the Creeks, we indulge the hope, that the...
I thank you for giving me the perusal of the enclosed.—The details are interesting.—The Picture is well drawn;—and it is to be feared, too well founded in facts.—With very sincere esteem and regard / I am Your Obedt & / Affecte. NjP : DeCoppet Collection.
We thank you, sir, for your faithful and detailed exposure of the existing situation of our country; and we sincerely join in sentiments of gratitude to an overruling Providence for the distinguished share of public prosperity and private happiness which the People of the United States so peculiarly enjoy. We are fully sensible of the advantages that have resulted from the adoption of measures...
Compliments to the Vice-President Enclosed is the curious and Insulting Letter mentioned yesterday Evening MHi : Adams Papers.
I thank you for giving me the perusal of the enclosed.—The sentiments do honor to the head & heart of the writer;—and if my wishes would be of any avail, they shd. go to you in a strong hope that you will not withhold merited promotion from Mr. Jno. Adams because he is your son.—For with out intending to compliment the father or the mother, or to censure any others: I give it as my decided...
I have heard with much pleasure, that you contemplate a visit to the City designated for the permanent Seat of the Government of the U. States, in the course of the Summer, or early in Autumn.— It is unnecessary, I hope, for me in that event, to express the satisfaction it would give Mrs. Washington & me to see Mrs. Adams, yourself & Company in the shade of our Vine & Fig tree;—but I shall...
I have this morning received, with great Pleasure, the Letter you did me the Honor to write me, on the Seventeenth of this month. Although a Visit to the City of Washington would give me great Pleasure, and chiefly for the opportunity it would afford me of paying my Respects at Mount Vernon; Yet I cannot but consider the execution of the Plan, as very uncertain. I thank you, Sir, for your...
Not being in the habit since my return to private life, of sending regularly to the Post Office (nine miles from hence) every Post-day, it often happens that letters addressed to me lye longer there, on that account, than they otherwise would do. I have delayed no time, unnecessarily, since I had the honor of receiving your very obliging favour of the 22d. Ulto. to thank you for the polite and...
Mr Mc Henry the Secretary at War, will have the honor to wait on you, in my behalf to impart to you a step I have ventured to take, & which I should have been happy to have communicated in person, if such a journey had been at this time in my power. As I said in a former letter, if it had been in my power to nominate you to be President of the United States, I should have done it, with less...
I had the honour on the evening of the 11th. instant to receive from the hands of the Secretary of War, your favour of the 7th. announcing, that you had with the advice and consent of the Senate appointed me “Lieutenant General and Commander in Chief of all the Armies raised, or to be raised, for the Service of the U.S” I cannot express how greatly affected I am at this New proof of public...
With all the respect which is due to your public station, and with the regard I entertain for your private character, the following representation is presented to your consideration.—If in the course of it, any expression should escape me which may appear to be incompatible with either,—let the purity of my intentions;—the candour of my declarations;—and a due respect for my own character, be...
I received, Yesterday the Letter you did me the Honor to write me on the 25th. of September. You request to be informed, whether my determination to reverse the order of the three Major Generals, is final.—and whether I mean to appoint another Adjutant General without your Concurrence.—I presume, that before this Day you have received Information, from the Secretary at War, that I some time...
The letter with which you were pleased to honor me, dated the 9th. instant—was received by the last Mail; and demands my particular acknowledgments. It was with sincere concern I received the account of Mrs. Adams’s low state of health, and your consequent indisposition—If my fervent wishes would restore her, and you, to perfect health, this object would soon be accomplished:—and in these...
The letter herewith enclosed from Mr Joel Barlow (though of old date) came to my hands only yesterday.— I have conceived it to be my duty to transmit it to you without delay;—and without a comment;—except that it must have been written with a very good, or a very bad design:—which of the two, you can judge better than I.—For, from the known abilities of that Gentleman, such a letter could not...
Although I received the Honor of your Letter of the first of this month in its Season, I determined to postpone my Answer to it, till I had deliberated, on it, and the Letter from Barlow inclosed in it, as well as a multitude of other Letters and Documents official and unofficial, which relate to the Same Subject, and determined what Part to act. I Yesterday determined to nominate Mr. Murray...
I have been duly honoured with your favour of the 19th Ulto. mentioning the nomination of Mr. Murray to be Minister Plenipotentiary to the French Republic.— With the writer of the letter, which I did myself the honour to enclose in my last to you, I truly observed that I had never held any correspondence;—and I only knew him in his public mission from this Country to the Barbary States, the...
[ New York ] April 20, 1776 . The return is headed: “A Return of the Colony Company of Artillery commanded by Alexander Hamilton April 20th, 1776” and is in the form of a table showing the number of each rank present and fit for duty, sick, on furlough, on command duty, or taken as prisoner. Hamilton’s company contained a total of 69 commissioned and noncommissioned officers. AD , George...
[ Harlem Heights, New York ] September 29, 1776. In George Washington’s “Warrant Book No 2” an entry for this date reads “To Capn Hamilton for his Co Arty. Aug–774. 3/72 [dollars].” D , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
[ Bucks County, Pennsylvania ] December 19, 1776. In George Washington’s “Warrant Book No. 2” an entry for this date reads:”To Capn Alexr Hamilton his pay for his Coy. Arty from 1st Sepr to 1 Decr—1562 [dollars].” D , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
[ Morristown, New Jersey, January 20, 1777. A statement in George Washington’s letter to Lieutenant Colonel Robert Hanson Harrison of this date reads: “Be so good as to forward the Inclosed to Captn. Hamilton.” Letter not found. ] Before the Revolution, Harrison, who was a native of Maryland, was a lawyer in Alexandria, Virginia, where he met Washington and became his occasional legal adviser....
Alexander Hamilton Esquire is appointed Aide-De-Camp to the Commander in Chief; and is to be respected and obeyed as such. Facsimile, Hamilton, Intimate Life Allan McLane Hamilton, The Intimate Life of Alexander Hamilton (New York, 1910). , 37. H’s copy of the General Orders has not been found. Washington’s General Orders of March 1, 1777, are printed in GW John C. Fitzpatrick, ed., The...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 1, 1777. Seeks to mitigate severity of Campbell’s imprisonment. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Campbell, a member of the 71st Regiment of the British army, was a prisoner in Concord, Massachusetts.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 1, 1777. Orders investigation of fraudulent recruiting returns. Requests inoculation of two Virginia regiments. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 3, 1777. Discusses Arnold’s proposed attack against Rhode Island. Notes that Arnold’s name was not on list of newly promoted major generals. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Arnold was at this time in Providence, Rhode Island. On May 2, 1777, Arnold was promoted to the rank of major general. On August 8, 1777, he was given a...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 3, 1777. Asks Clinton to decide location of cannon on the Hudson. Places choice of men and officers for Clinton’s forces in Clinton’s hands. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress; LS in writing of H, George Washington Photostats, Library of Congress. Clinton, a brigadier general in the Continental Army, was at New Windsor, New York,...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 3, 1777. Orders Heath to relieve Major General Artemas Ward. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Heath, who was in command of the Hudson River posts, was appointed Artemas Ward’s successor as commander of the Eastern Department on Ward’s resignation.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 3, 1777. Requests that proposed Rhode Island venture be undertaken only if success is certain. Discusses inoculation of troops. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 3, 1777. Accepts Ward’s resignation. Appoints Major General William Heath to succeed Ward. Df , in writings of H and John Fitzgerald, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 3, 1777. Discusses Woodford’s loss of seniority. Urges Woodford to accept promotion to brigadier general. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Differences in opinion having arisen, between General Howe and myself, respecting the construction of a proposition, made the 30th. of July and acceded to the 1st. of August last, for the exchange of prisoners, whereby it was stipulated, that officers should be given for officers of equal rank, soldier for soldier, and citizen for citizen; for the accommodation of these differences, and to...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 6, 1777. Requests a return of troops. Questions validity of some returns and suspects fraud. Orders McDougall to have troops in readiness at Peekskill. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress . LS, in the handwriting of H, the W. Wright Hawkes Collection of Revolutionary War Documents, on deposit at Union College, Schenectady, New York.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 8, 1777. Instructs Smallwood to order all officers and men not needed for recruiting to repair to camp. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 11, 1777. Transmits commission for William Hull. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Brooks was a Massachusetts doctor turned soldier. Major William Hull, Eighth Massachusetts Regiment.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 11, 1777. Orders preparations for approaching campaign. Mifflin was the quartermaster general of the Army.