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As the Transmission of the inclosed paper through the usual Channel of the Department of foreign Affairs would, on the present Occasion, probably be attended with great Delay—and recent Intelligence of Military Transactions must be important to our Ministers in Europe at the present period of Affairs—I have thought it would be agreeable both to Congress and your Excellency, that the Matter...
We the Senate of the United States, return you our sincere thanks for your excellent speech delivered to both Houses of Congress; congratulate you on the compleat organization of the federal Government, and felicitate ourselves and our fellow-citizens on your elevation to the Office of President: an Office highly important by the Powers constitutionally annexed to it and extremely honorable...
The President of the United States wishes to avail himself of your sentiments on the following points— 1st Whether a line of Conduct, equally distant from an association with all kinds of Company on the one hand, and from a total seclusion from Society on the other ought to be adopted by him?—and in that case how it is to be done? 2d: What will be the least exceptionable Method of bringing any...
The Vice President of the United States has the honour to present his humble Opinion, on the Points proposed, for his consideration. 1. That an Association with all kinds of company, and a total Seclusion from Society, are extreams, which, in the actual Circumstances of this Country, and under our form of Government, may be properly avoided. 2. The System of the President, will gradually...
Among the Candidates for the Honour of public Employment; under the new Government there is one, whose connection in my family, and public relation to me, in the late legation to St. James’s Would render my total silence on his account, liable to misinterpretation, as proceeding, either from want of esteem, confidence, or affection for him on the one hand, or to a failure of rispect to the...
The inclosed letters are from two as respectable characters as any in Massachusetts, containing information which I hope has been transmitted to you, through other channels. But as it is possible, it may be otherwise, it is my duty to lay them before you, which I beg leave to do by the bearer Colo: Smith. With all possible deference and respect I have the honor to be, Sir your / most obedient,...
Whenever there shall be a sufficient number of the two Houses of Congress assembled to proceed to business, I request to be informed of it. And also at what time and place it will be convenient for Congress that I should meet them, in order to make some oral communications at the commencement of their Session— I have the honor to be / Sir / your most humble Servant DLC : Papers of George...
Address of the Senate of the United States to the President of the United States in answer to his Speech— We the Senate of the United States return our thanks for your Speech delivered to both Houses of Congress. The accession of the State of North Carolina to the Constitution of the United States gives us much pleasure; and we offer you our congratulations on that event, which at the same...
I have directed my private Secretary to lay before you, a copy of the adoption, by the Legislature of South Carolina, of the articles proposed by Congress to the legislatures of the several states, as amendments to the constitution of the United States; together with the copy of a letter from the Governor of the state of South Carolina to the President of the United States, which have lately...
The President of the United States has this day approved of, and affixed his signature to, the act, entitled “An act for the punishment of certain crimes against the United States. ” Printed Source--Senate Journal.
The President of the United States has, this day, approved of, and affixed his signature to, “An act for the government of the territory of the United States south of the river Ohio;” and to “An act to continue in force an act, passed at the last session of Congress, entitled ‘An act to regulate processes in the courts of the United States.” Printed Source--Senate Journal.
The President of the United States has, on this day, approved of, and affixed his signature to, the “Act for establishing the temporary and permanent seat of the government of the United States.” Printed Source--Senate Journal.
The President of the United States has this day approved of, and affixed his signature to, “An act to alter the times for holding the circuit courts of the United States in the districts of South Carolina and Georgia, and providing that the district court of Pennsylvania shall, in future, be held in the city of Philadelphia only.” Printed Source--Senate Journal.
Being very desireous of obtaining such aids and information as will enable me to form a just opinion upon the subject of the enclosed paper, in case the events therein mentioned should take place; I have taken the liberty to submit it to you for your consideration, requesting that you will favor me with an opinion thereon. With very great esteem & regard / I am / Sir, / Your most Obedt: Hbl....
The Resolution of the Board for the Reduction of the Public Debt of the 27th of August 1790, which has been submitted to me meets my ideas fully on the subject, and is now enclosed with my approbation.— With very great esteem & regard / I am, Sir, / Your Most Obedient Servant DLC : Papers of George Washington.
That New Orleans, and the Spanish Posts on the Missisippi, will be among the first attempts of the English, in case of a war with Spain, appears very probable: and that a combined operation from Detroit, would be convenient to that end cannot be doubted. The Consequences, on the western Settlements, on the commerce with the West Indies, and on the general Security and tranquility of the...
At twelve o’clock the Senate attended upon the President of the United States at his own House, when the President of the Senate delivered the following Address. To the President of the United States of America. We receive, Sir, with particular satisfaction the communications contained in your Speech, which confirm to us the progressive State of the public Credit, and afford at the same time,...
I am directed to communicate to the Senate, that the President of the United States has this day approved and signed an act, entitled “An act supplementary to the act, entitled ’An act making further provision for the payment of the debts of the United States.” Printed Source--Senate Journal.
I am commanded to inform the Senate, that the President of the United States has this day approved and signed an act, entitled “An act declaring the consent of Congress that a new state be formed within the jurisdiction of the commonwealth of Virginia, and admitted into this Union, by the name of the state of Kentucky.” Printed Source--Senate Journal.
The President of the United States has this day approved and signed “The act for the admission of the state of Vermont into this Union.” He also delivered the following written message from the President of the United States. Printed Source--Senate Journal.
The President of the United States has this day approved and signed two acts which originated in the Senate; one, ’An act to incorporate the subscribers to the Bank of the United States;’ the other, ’An act regulating the number of Representatives to be chosen by the states of Kentucky and Vermont.’ Printed Source--Senate Journal.
Certain matters touching the public good requiring that the Senate shall be convened on Friday the 4th Instant, I have desired their attendance, as I do yours by these Presents, at the Senate Chamber in Philadelphia on that day, then and there to receive and deliberate on such Communications as shall be made to you on my part.— DLC : Papers of George Washington.
The President of the United States has this day approved and signed a resolution, which originated in the Senate, requesting that the President of the United States would cause to be communicated to the National Assembly of France the sense which Congress have of the tribute paid to the memory of Benjamin Franklin.” Printed Source--Senate Journal.
The President of the United States has this day approved and signed the following acts: “An act to amend an act for establishing the temporary and permanent seat of the government of the United States;” and “An act making an appropriation for the purpose therein mentioned.” Printed Source--Senate Journal.
The President of the United States has this day approved and signed “the resolve for establishing the mint;” and “the resolve requesting the President of the United States to cause an estimate to be laid before Congress of the lands not claimed by the Indians.” Printed Source--Senate Journal.
The President of the United States has this day approved and signed the following acts which originated in the Senate: “An act to continue in force the act therein mentioned, and to make further provision for the payment of pensions to invalids, and for the support of light-houses, beacons, buoys, and public piers;” and “An act for granting lands to the inhabitants and settlers at Vincennes,...
The Senate of the United States have received with the highest satisfaction the assurance of public prosperity contained in your Speech to both Houses: the multiplied blessings of providence have not escaped our notice or failed to excite our gratitude. The benefits which flow from a restoration of public and private confidence are conspicuous and important and the pleasure with which we...
Captain John of Harvard in the Massachusetts, has been recommended to me, by so many respectable characters, and in such handsome terms, that I cannot refuse his request of a Line to the President of the United States in his favour. He has the merit of long and early Services, though he is said to have been lately unfortunate. As his application is entirely out of my Department, and to a Judge...
At twelve o’Clock, agreeably to appointment, the Senate waited on the President at his House and presented the following Address. Accept, Sir, the thanks of the Senate for your Speech delivered to both Houses of Congress at the opening of the session. Your reelection to the chief magistracy of the United States gives us sincere pleasure. We consider it as an event every way propitious to the...
I would thank you for giving the papers herewith sent a perusal—and for the result of it.— I am now deliberating on the measure proper & necessary to be taken with respect to Mr. G——t and wish for aid in so doing; the critical state of things making me more than usually anxious to decide right in the present case.— None but the heads of departments are privy to these papers, which I pray may...