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    • Washington, George

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Washington, George"
Results 55471-55480 of 55,909 sorted by editorial placement
Colo. Hamilton came so late that I could only broach the subject to him. He will breakfast with me at 8 Oclock, at which time If you can make it convenient I should be glad of your Company, after which we will talk the matter over fully. Yrs., RC ( DLC ); addressed: “Mr. Jefferson”; endorsed by TJ as received 16 Jan. 1792 and recorded in SJPL , where the entry contains this addition: “Colo....
I have duly received your favors of Jan. 7. and 9. am sensible of the expediency of the act of authority you have found it necessary to exercise over all the persons employed in the public works under your care, and fully approve of what you did. It has appeared I think that nothing less would draw their attention to a single source of authority and confine their operations to specified...
The conduct of Majr. L’Enfant and those employed under him, astonishes me beyond measure!—and something more than even appears, must be meant by them—When you are at leisure I should be glad to have a further conversation with you on this subject.—Yrs. sincerely & affectionately, RC ( DLC ); endorsed by TJ as received 18 Jan. 1792 and recorded in SJPL , where the note is described as being “on...
The Secretary of State, to whom was referred by the President of the United States, the letter of the Governor of Virginia of January 7th. 1792, with the Report of a Committee of the House of Delegates of that Commonwealth of December 12th. 1791, and Resolution of the General Assembly thereon of December 17th. on the case of Charles Russell, late an Officer in the service of the said...
Th: Jefferson presents his respects to the President of the U.S. and subjoins what he supposes might form a proper introduction to the statement prepared by the Secretary at war. The occasion is so new, that however short the letter proposed, he has no doubt it will need correction both as to the matter and manner. Sir As the circumstances which have engaged the U.S. in the present Indian war,...
Enclosed is the rough draught of a letter to G.M.—I pray you to examine it, and alter any word, or sentence you may think too strong; or the whole of it, retaining my object; from which I shall make a fair copy and then take a press one: be not scrupulous therefore in making the alterations you judge necessary.—In the course of tomorrow I will send you the letter to be made up with your...
Th:Jefferson presents his respects to the President and returns him the draught of the letter with proofs of his confidence in the indulgence of the President, having freely used the liberty he gave him in softening some expressions lest they should be too much felt by Mr. Morris. The changes are made with a pencil only, and can therefore be easily restored where disapproved. PrC ( DLC ).
Your favor of the 30th. Sep. came duly to hand, and I thank you for the important information contained in it.—The official communications from the Secretary of State will convey to you the evidence of my nomination and appointment of you to be Minister Plenipotentiary for the United States at the Court of France; and my assurance that both were made with all my heart, will, I am persuaded,...
Th: Jefferson sends to the President a letter he received from Mr. Hammond, with the general sketch of an answer he had proposed to write to him. He will have the honour of seeing the President on the subject to-day. RC ( DNA : RG 59, MLR ); endorsed by Lear. Tr ( DNA : RG 59, SDC ). Not recorded in SJL
Mr. Ellicot having sent the inclosed letter from Roberdeau for the perusal of Th: Jefferson, he thinks the 1st. page and 2 or 3. lines of the 2d. worth reading by the President. The rest contains communications of small news. He has learnt that Majr. Lenfant, after his conversation with Th: J. wrote to Roberdeau to continue 50. hands; which shews he means to continue himself. Is the...