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Th: Jefferson has the honor to send to the President Dr. Thornton’s answer to Mr. Hallet’s objections this moment received, and which he has not had time to read. Perhaps the President may think it worth while to communicate them to Mr. Hobens and see what he thinks of them, for which reason he sends them to the President in the instant of recieving them. RC ( DNA : RG 59, MLR ); endorsed by...
Being sensible that the sooner your communications were made known to Mr Fitzhugh, and the result to you, so much the sooner wou’d your mind be reliev’d, I waited on him today and fully inform’d him of everything respecting the Conversation the Gentleman had with you at the Dinner in Alexandria on the 4th of July, and of your Sentiments on that Subject—Mr Fitzhugh had hear’d nothing, and says,...
Papers requiring the President’s instant attention. Th: J’s letter to Viar & Jaudenes. }     the Courier goes on Saturday. Genet’s communications relative to Spain Little Sarah. the Governor’s letter of June 24. & Warden’s 1st report. the Governor’s letter of July 7. x Th: J’s conversation with Genet. x Th: J’s opinion against firing on the Little Sarah. Rawle’s letter. July 9. Genet’s letter....
to be read at the President’s leisure. Governr H. Lee’s letter. June 28. concerning supposed pestilential disease in W. I. The Suckey. Th: J’s letter June 26. to mister Hammond. Th: J. to mister Hammond. June 25. on insinuation concerning Western posts. do to do do developemt of order about privateers arming. Philips’s letter June 7. cannot be received as Consul at Curaçoa. Chiappe’s letter...
Before I had read the Papers put into my hands by you, requiring “instant attention” and a messenger could reach your Office, you had left town. What is to be done in the case of the Little Sarah, now at Chester? Is the Minister of the French Republic to set the Acts of this Government at defiance— with impunity ? and then threaten the Executive with an appeal to the People. What must the...
Th: Jefferson presents his respects to the President. he had expected that the Secretaries of the Treasury & War would have given to the President immediately the statement of facts in the case of the Little Sarah, as drawn by the former & agreed to, as also their Reasons: but Colo. Hamilton having informed Th: J. that he has not been able to prepare copies, Th: J. sends the President the...
General Pickens will do me the honor to deliver you this; he is a gentleman of great worth and integrity and is well acquainted with the situation of these Southern States particularly the Indian affair, he and I have had some conversation respecting them, we agree that nothing else can be done, then that an Expedition composed of the Militia of the three Southern States should be immediately...
Papers requiring the President’s instant attention. Th:J’s letter to Viar and Jaudenes . } the Courier goes on Saturday. Genet’s communications relative to Spain     Little Sarah. the Governor’s letter of June 24 . and Warden’s 1st. report . the Governor’s letter of July 7. x Th:J’s conversation with Genet .
To be read at the President’s leisure. Governr. H. Lee’s letter. June 28. concerning supposed pestilential disease in W.I. The Suckey. Th:J’s letter June 26. to Mr. Hammond. Th:J. to Mr. Hammond. June 25. on insinuation concerning Western posts. do.  to do.          do.     developement of order about privateers arming. Philips’s  letter June 7. cannot be received as Consul at Curaçoa....
Before I had read the Papers put into my hands by you, requiring “instant attention” and a messenger could reach your Office, you had left town. What is to be done in the case of the Little Sarah, now at Chester? Is the Minister of the French Republic to set the Acts of this Government at defiance— with impunity ? and then threaten the Executive with an appeal to the People. What must the...
Th: Jefferson presents his respects to the President. He had expected that the Secretaries of the Treasury and War would have given to the President immediately the statement of facts in the case of the Little Sarah, as drawn by the former and agreed to, as also their Reasons: but Colo. Hamilton having informed Th:J. that he has not been able to prepare copies, Th:J. sends the President the...
General Knox will of course lay before you our Communications of this date. We address you that we may literally comply with our promise to the Deputies of the Western Indians, “that we would desire you to issue fresh orders to General Wayne, not only to abstain from hostilities, but to remain quietly at his Posts, untill the event of the treaty should be known.” Our sentiments on this subject...
Your excellency as the Soldier’s friend, will I hope be pleased to pardon the liberty I take in addressing myself, to your Excellency, on a subject of a private nature, but of the greatest importance to myself. Early in the month of September, in 1778 when the American head-quarters, were at the White-Plaines, I as an Officer in the German service arrived there, from New York, and was...
In consequence of some reports, respecting the equipments of the English Letter of Marque, the Jane, I thought there was reason to suspect that she was fitting out as a Cruiser; and, therefore, I directed the Master Warden to renew his enquiries upon the subject. His report, and the paper mentioned in it I have now the honor to transmit for your consideration. I take this opportunity,...
The Secretary of Treasury having communicated to Genl Knox & myself that he had been informed that the Little Sarah had much augmented her arms, and was greatly advanced in her preparations, we concurred in opinion that the Govr should be desired to have a reexamination of the fact. it was done & a Report made that she had entered the port with only 4. guns, & now had 14 &c. the next day,...
At a meeting at the State house of the city of Philadelphia July 8. 1793. Present the Secretary of state, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary at War. It appears that a brigantine called the Little Sarah has been fitted out at the port of Philadelphia, with fourteen cannon, & all other equipments indicating that she is intended as a Privateer to cruise under the authority of France, &...
Permettés à un Soldat de la Liberté qui met Toute sa gloire au Bonheur d’avoir Servi Sous Le plus grand General Républicain de ce Siecle, et Se rapeller à Son Souvenir, et de Vous recommander M⟨ mutilated ⟩el Morgan Obrien pour Consul Si les Etats unis de L’amérique Se déterminent d’en envoyer un dans cette Colonie, dapres La Demande qu’elle Va faire au Congres. La Sagesse de ce Citoyen Ses...
Reasons for the opinion of The Secretary of the Treasury and the Secretary of War respecting the Brigantine Little Sarah. Because there can be no doubt, either upon principle or authority that the permitting or suffering or what is equivalent the not taking effectual measures to prevent, when known, the fitting out of privateers , in our ports, by one of the belligerent powers, to cruise...
Agreeably to your instructions contained in a letter from the Secretary at War, of the 24th of May last, it may be proper to state, particularly, the proceedings in the case of the Little Sarah, the prize to L’Embuscade, supposed to be equipped and manned in this Port, as a Privateer. Having instructed the Board of Wardens to be attentive to any appearance of a practice of this kind, the...
The inclosed papers, respecting our unfortunate Citizens, captives in Algiers, came to my Hand a Day or two ago—their contents are of such a nature that I think it my duty to transmit them to the supreme Executive of the Union. With perfect respect—and unfeigned Regard—I have the Honor to be—Sir Your most Obedt & humle Servant ALS , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; ADf , NHi : Naval History...
At a meeting at the State house of the city of Philadelphia July 8. 1793. Present the Secretary of state, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary at War. It appears that a brigantine called the Little Sarah has been fitted out at the port of Philadelphia, with fourteen cannon, and all other equipments indicating that she is intended as a Privateer to cruise under the authority of France,...
I am against the preceding opinion of the Secretaries of the Treasury and War, for ordering a battery to be erected on Mud-island, and firing on the Little Sarah, an armed vessel of the Republic of France. Because I am satisfied from what passed between Mr. Genet and myself at our personal interview yesterday, that the vessel will not be ordered to sail till the return of the President, which,...
Agreable to your request, I applied to Mr Gwinn respecting his undertaking the stewardship at Mount Vernon and have at his particular desire, to inform you that while he continues to act in that Capacity, he cannot with propriety decline the business of his present Employer: however that it would give him pleasure to render you any temporary service in riding down frequently & attending to...
Inclosed I have the honor to submit to your Excellency’s consideration, a copy of a letter from the Counsul of the French Republic, stating the arrival of an English armed vessel at Mud Fort, and requesting, either that she may be prevented from entering the harbour, or directed to withdraw in case she should enter it; a copy of the report made by the Master Warden respecting the vessel in...
Letter not found: from Cleon Moore, 5 July 1793. GW wrote Moore on 19 July that he had “duly received your letter of the 5th instt.”
That America should remain in peace and enjoy the blessings of their free government undisturbed by European concerns We believe to be the earnest desire of every wellwisher to our Country, and We feel the most cordial satisfaction in expressing to you our conviction of the Wisdom of the part you have taken to preserve the publick repose and happiness—In declaring by your proclamation the...
ONE great advantage resulting from a republican system of government is, the unrestrained privilege of scrutinizing public measures, and candidly investigating the conduct of those men, who are entrusted with the management of public affairs. No character, however dignified, no measure, however important, can possibly escape the exercise of this invaluable right. It is unnecessary, at present,...
I send, for the information and consideration of the Heads of the Departments, a letter which I received by the post of yesterday from the Governor of North Carolina, stating the measures which he has taken relative to a privateer fitted out from South Carolina under a French Commission, and which had arrived, with a prize, in the Port of Wilmington in North Carolina. I intend setting out for...
I send, for the information and consideration of the Heads of the Departments, a letter which I received by the post of Yesterday from the Governor of North Carolina, stating the measures which he has taken relative to a privateer fitted out from South Carolina under a French Commission, and which had arrived, with a prize, in the Port of Wilmington in North Carolina. I intend setting out for...
A talk from the heads of the Upper and lower Creeks by order of the Mad Dog of the Tuckebatchees given out at the Cussetau Square at a meeting of a number of the lower Creeks, this 21st of July 1793. Cussitahs 3d July 1793. We the heads of the Creek nation wish to acquaint your Excellency that we are just informed by a runner of our own people from the Chickesaw Nation that there was some of...
this Spring when I was Saving fish at your landing known by the name of Dasays ferry, I had Some Conversation with Mr Whitting About takeing All the fish that might be Caught at that Landing for a term of years the time to Comence nex[t] fishing Season he told me that he would Comunicate my proposal to you it is Likeley that Mr Whitting being unwell that this business was not attended two As...
The President Sends to the Secretary of State the enclosed letter from Mr. Chiappe, which has been forwarded by Mr. Simpson at Gibralter. If, upon translating this letter, there should be found in it any thing important to be communicated to the President—the Secretary will do it when the President arrives in Philadelphia. The President proposes to set out from this place on sunday next. RC (...
I humbly Submit to your Excellency the inclos’d for your consideration, and, conscious as I am of the boldness of this Intrusion, I shall not add to my presumption by attempting an apology where none is adequate to the occasion. I shall only therefore observe, that my distress is occasioned by a late Severe ilness, to shake off the Effects of which, I am advis’d to have recourse to the Berkley...
The very polite invitation which you have given me in the name of the Citizens of Alexandria, to celebrate with them the approaching Anniversary of American Independence —is received by me as a mark of attention meriting my warmest thanks—and as the best proof I can give of my feelings on the occasion will be to accept the invitation, I shall accordingly have the pleasure of meeting them at...
I have considered in the best manner my small knowledge in Architecture, & the peculiar situation of my own Private concerns (which brought me here) will enable me to do—the observations made by mr Hallet on the plan which has been exhibited by Doctr Thornton—& on acct of its exterior beauty, & the arrangement of the Apartments, had been adopted. But if this plan is as expensive as it is...
Yesterday I had the honour to receive your Excellency’s letter of the 22d of April and I am impatient to acquaint you that I received yours of the 1st of May 1792 which had been detained by Mr Robertson in expectation as he informed me of sending it with the Portrait which however has never yet arrived. I am charmed with the account your Excellency has been pleased to give me of the growing...
The enclosed letter from the Governor of New York, covering a communication to him from the Consul of the French Republic at that place, respecting the continuance of a British Letter of Marque in the Harbour of New York—reached my hands by the post of last evening; and I now transmit it to you, that it may be taken into consideration by yourself and the other Heads of the Departments, as soon...
You will find by the enclosed letter from the Commissioners that Mr Hallet reports unfavorably of Doctor Thornton’s Plan “on the great points of practicability, time and expence:” and that I am referred “to Mr Blodget, Hoben, and Hallet, whose verbal information will be better than any we can give you"—on which to form ultimate Instructions. Mr Blodget I met at Baltimore in the moment I was...
The enclosed letter from the Governor of New York, covering a communication to him from the Consul of the French Republic at that place, respecting the continuance of a British Letter of Marque in the Harbour of New York—reached my hands by the post of last evening; and I now transmit it to you, that it may be taken into consideration by yourself and the other Heads of the Departments, as soon...
You will find by the enclosed letter from the Commissioners that Mr. Hallet reports unfavorably of Doctor Thornton’s Plan “on the great points of practicability, time and expence”: And that I am referred “to Mr. Blodget, Hoben and Hallet, whose verbal information will be better than any we can give you”—on which to form ultimate Instructions. Mr. Blodget I met at Baltimore in the moment I was...
The Commissioners appointed to execute the several Acts of Congress, to provide more effectually for the settlement of the Accounts between the United States, and the Individual States, Report, That they have maturely considered the claims of the several States against the United States, and the charges of the United States against the individual States. That they have gone through the process...
We trust we have manifested, during our employment in the city of Washington, our zeal for its success, and the accomplishment of the main object: as a proof of this, we take the liberty of laying before you a statement of facts; and representing the mortifications to which we have constrained ourselves to submit, rather than relinquish an object which we wish to see accomplished and which has...
From my Wifes Father, the Revd Mr James Madgwick, whose parents & other relations lived at Cerne[,] Wareham & Poole in Dorset, I learn, your Ancestors and his, were the same, Mrs Jolliffe of Poole, my Father-in-law’s Aunt, being a Washington, being some Years since, when he related it to me (viz.) in the Year 1777 when I married I perhaps may not have been correct— he has been Dead upward of 5...
I should have taken time ere this to have considered the observations of mister Young, could I at this place have done it in such a way as would satisfy either him or myself. when I wrote the notes of the last year, I had never before thought of calculating what were the profits of a capital invested in Virginia agriculture. yet that appeared to be what mister Young most desired. lest...
I should have taken time ere this to have considered the observations of Mr. Young, could I at this place have done it in such a way as would satisfy either him or myself. When I wrote the notes of the last year , I had never before thought of calculating what were the profits of a capital invested in Virginia agriculture. Yet that appeared to be what Mr. Young most desired. Lest therefore no...
The seventh section of an Act of the 2d. of March last, intitled “An Act supplementary to the Act intitled An Act to provide more effectually for the collection of the Duties imposed by Law on goods, wares & merchandizes imported into the United States, and on the tonnage of Ships or Vessels,” provides “That the President of the United States may, if he shall judge it conducive to the public...
The seventh section of an Act of the 2d of March last, intitled “An Act supplementary to the Act intitled An Act to provide more effectually for the collection of the Duties imposed by Law on goods, wares & merchandizes imported into the United States, and on the tonnage of Ships or Vessels,” provides “That the President of the United States may, if he shall judge it conducive to the public...
I have promised myself the gratification of going to pay my devoirs to you for these two years that I have been in America; but it has been impossible for me to have that satisfaction. The Alarms in which I have been kept by the Indians, in the part of the County of Russel, upon the borders of Clinch, in Virginia, where I have purchased 55,000 Acres of land, have driven away a part of the...
On my return from my house, at Alexandria, I learnt that a letter, transmitted to me, here, for your Excellency, from Madame de la Fayette, had been put into the post-office. As I am desired, by my friend in England, through whom it was sent me, to inform him, whether it reached your Excellency’s hands, I beg leave to request you will deign to let me know, whether you received that letter:...
I have just receivd yours of the twenty fifth of March and do very sincerely condole with you on the melancholy Event which it communicates. Make I pray you my dear Sir the proper assurances of my Regret on this Occasion to Colo. Bassett as well as to Mrs Washington. Not having had Time to read the Gazettes which are but just (and but in part) arriv’d I cannot from them derive the Information...