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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Washington, George"
Results 311-360 of 55,128 sorted by date (descending)
I have been duly favored with your letter of the 20th instant—accompanying “The Philanthropist.” For your politeness in sending the latter, I pray you to receive my best thanks. Much indeed is it to be wished that the sentiments contained in the Pamphlet, and the doctrine it endeavours to inculcate, were more prevalent. Happy would it be for this country at least, if they were so. But while...
312[Diary entry: 28 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
28. Morning perfectly clear and Calm. Mer. at 66–76 at highest & 70 at Night. Clear all day with but little wind.
I would thank you for requesting Mr Blagden to give me as early notice of the time, and amount of his next call upon me, as he can, that I may prepare accordingly. With great esteem & regard I am—Dear Sir Yr most Obedt Servt ALS (photocopy), NjP . Presumably GW intended to write “Sir.” GW on 30 Aug. wrote William Herbert, president of the Bank of Alexandria, that he wished to extend the...
314[Diary entry: 27 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
27. Morning clear & pleasant & Wind at No. Wt. Mer. 75—at highest 72. Pleasant all day. Wind westerly until the afternoon then Calm.
By my Servant Tom, I was honored with your letter of the 21st instant. I am persuaded that, all ⟨the⟩ benefit which the nature of his case would admit he has, or will receive from your treatment of the affliction under which he labors and if it is incurable, I must be satisfied that I have neglected nothing to restore his sight to him. It was an imposition to ask you for money, (for I gave him...
Letter not found: from Thompson & Veitch, 27 Aug. 1799. On 30 Aug. GW apologized to Thompson & Veitch for “not acknowledging the receipt of your letter of the 27th instant sooner.”
317[Diary entry: 26 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
26. Morning calm & clear. Mer. at 76—at highest 86 and at night 75. A fine shower of Rain in the afternoon. Wind Southerly in the forenoon & northerly after the Rain.
318[Diary entry: 25 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
25. A shower of rain in the Night with lightning & distant thunder. Morng. calm & clear. Mer. 76. Wind Southerly afterwards and Mer. 80 at Night.
Your letter of the 17th instant in answer to mine of the 14th, has been received. I have already given you the specific terms on which I propose to rent my houses in the Federal City, and from which I shall not depart an iota; because I fixed them as low as any, with whom I conversed, though⟨t⟩ I ought to ask, and much lower than many seem disposed to take. It is true I did not give you the...
Some of the Officers of Cavalry, who accepted their appointments, and were informed by you in the Public Gazettes, that their Pay would commence therewith, have applied to me to know where, & in what manner they were to draw for it. Not being able to supply them on these points, I take the liberty of troubling you with this Address, on the subject; that I may be enabled to answer any enquiries...
321[Diary entry: 24 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
24. Morning clear—a light breeze from the Southward and Mer. at 70. Clear all day & warm. Mer. 80 at Night. Mr. White came to dinner—as did 4 Gentlemen from Phila. viz.—young Mr. Meridith (son of the Treasurer) Mr. Clifton, a Mr. Walter &—. The 4 last returned after dinner. young mr. meridith : a son of Samuel Meredith, treasurer of the United States, and his wife, Margaret Cadwalader Meredith.
At length the articles for my young friend has been procurr’d and is now waiting for a conveyance. There is a vessel up for Alexandria which I am informed is to sail in a day or two. I shall send them on board to day directed to the care of Col. Fitzgerald. They are in two small boxes. The sword is well wrapped up and directed in like manner. The office will move on monday to Trenton. Yours...
323[Diary entry: 23 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
23. Morning quite calm & tolerably clear. Mer. at 68–80 at highest & 66 at Night. Wind Southerly & clear after the Morning. Mr. & Mrs. Law came here to Dinner.
Enclosed you have Mr Ariss’s draught on James Russell Esqr., returned. It was presented to the latter for acceptance, by Mr Anderson, who received the following answer—to wit—that he had only £19 of Mr Ariss’s money in his hands, and could pay no more. This sum Mr Anderson refused to receive; and thus the matter ended with Mr Russell. Enclosed also you have the Press copy of a letter I wrote...
325[Diary entry: 22 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
22d. The sun rose clear, but very cloudy notwithstanding. Very little wind from the No. Et. Mer. at 64—afterwards & Clear. Mer. 72 at highest & 70 at Night.
The inclosed I have cut from a New-York paper. It reminds me of what I have repeatedly proposed to different citizens of Philadelphia— That in order to avoid the impurities of docks partly uncovered at low water, and to preserve a sufficient depth of water for vessels to enter, & even lie afloat, the wharfing of the city should be newly arranged. For this end, fixing a curve line which should...
I was yesterday honored with your letter of the 14th. instant. The recommendations of Captains Taylor and Blue will not fail to be considered when the situation of things is mature for the appointment of Brigade Inspectors. Inclosed you will find a general abstract of the recruiting Returns, which at its date were received at the Office of the Adjutant General. Other Information induces me to...
328[Diary entry: 21 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
21. Heavy morning, with the Wind at No. Et. & Mer. at 64—at highest 66 & at Night 65. The same slow & fine rain fell with Intervals after 12 oclock & early in the morning. Ground now fully wet.
I did myself the honor to inform you in my last that I had operated on your Servant Tom’s Eyes, that I had not very sanguine hopes of rendering him essential relief, and that the result would be ascertained in a fortnight. I am sorry that present appearances afford me no reason to alter my opinion. The tumor in the left Eye is, I am convinced, incurable; and a growing film in the right...
I was yesterday honored with your letter of the 14th instant. The recommendations of Captains Taylor and Blue will not fail to be considered when the situation of things is mature for the appointment of Brigade Inspectors. Inclosed you will find a General Abstract of the recruiting returns, which at its date were received at the Office of the Adjutant General. Other Information induces me to...
331[Diary entry: 20 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
20. Mer. at 69 in the morning. About ½ after 5, it began a fine, rain, with the wind at No. Et. & continued to do so until near 11 oclock when it ceased, but recommenced about ½ after 3 & contd. raining slow & fine until 9 oclock when I went to bed. Mer. 65 at Night. The rain this day must have been welcome to GW, who wrote to Robert Lewis 17 Aug. that the drought had caused his oat crop to...
Letter not found: from Auguste de Grasse, 20 Aug. 1799. On 9 Sept. GW wrote de Grasse : “I have received your letter of the 20th of August.”
333[Diary entry: 19 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
19. Morning Cloudy Wind at No. Et. & Mer. at 65—at highest 75 and at Night 69. Wind brisk at No. Et. all day.
334[Diary entry: 18 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
18. Morning—Mer. at 64—and 69 at Night. Wind No. & No. East and cool great appearances of Rain but none fell here.
335[Diary entry: 17 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
17. A Slow, & moderate rain for an hour or more fell About Middle of last night—but not sufft. to wet the grd. more than an Inch or two. This morning a little cloudy. Mer. at 70—& 68 at Night. Clouds at day & wind fresh from No. West & cool.
I was favored this morning with your letter of the 14th instant, and hasten to reply to it in order that it may be speedily ascertained whether I am to have your two houses in the Federal City, and the terms. From what passed when I was at that place last year I counted upon them with so much certainty that I have not thought of applying elsewhere, and I am still as desirous to occupy them as...
Your letter of the 7th instant came duly to hand, but being received with many other letters, it was laid by, and entirely forgotten, until I came across it yesterday again. Mr Ariss’s draught on Mr James Russell for £42 pounds shall be presented to him, but if he is indisposed to pay it, or wants time to do it, he has a good pretext for delay, as you have sent it without your Endorsement,...
Yesterday I went to 1268. 1175. 1582. to meet Mr 913. 753⟨.⟩ I had before met him at a more distant place. Knowing from ⟨his⟩ letters to me, that he intended to go to the United States, a measure ⟨which⟩ I opposed by every argument I could think of—I since that enjoyed ⟨the⟩ pleasure of your letter to him of December last, & on his lately w⟨riting⟩ to me for passports, informing me of his...
339[Diary entry: 16 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
16. Mer. at 71 in the Morning—No wind & clear—82 at highest and 78 at N. Young Mr. McCarty dined here. young mr. mccarty : probably Daniel McCarty (d. 1811), son of Daniel McCarty (1759–1801) of Cedar Grove ( SPROUSE [4] Edith Moore Sprouse. Mount Air, Fairfax County, Virginia . [Fairfax, Va.], 1970. , 15–20).
340[Diary entry: 15 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
15. Morning Calm & clear. Mer. at 80. Wind Southerly afterwards & Mer. at 85—and 82 at Night. Mr. Thos. Digges dined here.
Letter not found: from Zechariah Lewis, 15 Aug. 1799. On 30 Aug. GW wrote Lewis that he had received his “favor of the 15th instant.”
Enclosed are sundry letters (as mentioned on the other side) which have come to my hands, recommending Captain Edmund Taylor and Captain William K. Blue for the Office of Brigade Inspector. As this Officer is to be appointed by the Inspector General I forward these letters for your consideration; and add, that I have not a personal knowledge of the Gentlemen recommended which can enable me to...
343[Diary entry: 14 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
14. Morning clear & calm. Mer. at 71 and at night 83. Wind Southerly & Fresh after the Morning—with clouds to the West.
It is reported, & generally believed, that the Houses I am building in the Federal City are engaged to you. To your having the houses I have no objection, nor should I have any to the prevalence of the report, if a specific agreement had ever taken place. But as this is not the case, and until it happens may, & doubtless will be injurious to me, inasmuch as they may prevent applications from...
Enclosed are sundry letters (as mentioned on the other side) which have come to my hands, recommending Captain Edmund Taylor and Captain William K. Blue for the Office of Brigade Inspector. As this Officer is to be appointed by the Inspector General I forward these letters for your consideration; and add, that I have not a personal knowledge of the Gentlemen recommended which can enable me to...
Governor Davie of N. Carolina sent me by the last mail, three copies of a little work of his intitled, “instructions to be observed for the formations and movements of Cavalry,” one of which he requested me, which I now do, to present to the commander in chief. I do not recollect whether I mentioned to you, that he is one in the Commission to the Directory. The President has directed the...
A few days ago in Norfolk, I was informed that it was contemplated by government to establish a marine hospital there. I had received similar information in Europe & mentioned the subject to Colo. Pickering, immediately on my arrival in America, who informed me that Congress had defered taking the business into consideration so late in the last cession, that it was necessarily put off till the...
348[Diary entry: 13 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
13. Morning perfectly clear and quite calm. Mer. at 73–82 at Night & close—thunder, lightning & rain in the West & No. Wt. but none fell here.
Your letter of the 10th came to hand yesterday—and since you have desired it, the subject of this shall be confined to Mr Carrolls lot only. I am not at all solicitous to purchase it; nor shall I pronounce the price he has set upon it, high, or low; The situation alone constitutes the value of it in my estimation, but my becoming the purchaser thereof, depends upon three things; two of which I...
350[Diary entry: 12 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
12. Morning quite clear—wind westerly—and Mer. 70 at sunrising—82 at highest & 80 at Night. Clouds & some rain to the Southward—but none fell here.
I have duly received your letter of the 7th inst., enclosing reccommendations in favor of Mr James Glenn for a Captaincy in the Provisional Army; and shall attend to your request to return this, and similar papers, whenever the list for Virginia shall be completed. But, Sir, I must candidly acknowledge to you that I see no prospect of completing the selection of Officers from this State, for...
I should have acknowledged the receipt of your favor of the 22d Ultimo before this, had I not been for sometime in daily expectation of seeing Genl Wm Washington, to whom I wished to communicate the contents of it. The General was here a few days since, when I put your recommendation of Captn Edmund Taylor for Brigade Inspector into his hands, and as he is gone on to Philadelphia, I presume...
Letter not found: from Thomas (later Robert Treat) Paine, 12 Aug. 1799. On 1 Sept. GW wrote Paine : “I have duly received your letter of the 12th of August.”
It may be justly expected that I should make some Apology for giving you this Trouble. I am embolden’d to it, from your Character in the World, & from a persuasion that the recollection of an Old Friend, & fellow Soldier, may afford you some Pleasure. The reason of my Application will best be explained to you by the perusal of a Letter I received last March—a Copy of which I shall now...
[ Mount Vernon, August 11, 1799. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from G—— Washington to General Hamilton,” Columbia University Libraries.
356[Diary entry: 11 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
11. Morning clear—wind Southerly—and Mer. at 73; 83 at highest—& 80 at Night—clear all day—& wind pretty fresh.
Sometime ⟨between illegible ⟩ment to the walks of ⟨private illegible ⟩ girl*, the body servant of Mrs Washington⟨,⟩ absconded without the least pr⟨ovocation⟩ and without our having ⟨ illegible sus⟩picion of such, her intention ⟨ illegible ⟩ whither she had gone. At length, we learnt ⟨ illegible ⟩ got to Portsmouth in New H⟨ampshire; in⟩ consequence of this information ⟨ illegible ⟩ authentic)...
Your private letters of the 29th Ulto & 5th instant, have been duly received. Mr Bordley for presenting, and you for forwarding his Essays on Husbandry, are entitled to, and, accordingly receive, my thanks for these instances of both your kindnesses. (Confidential) I think you Wisemen of the East, have got yourselves into a hobble, relatively to France, Great Britain, Russia & the Porte—to...
A day or two after my last letter to you was sent to the Post Office, I received your obliging favor of the 2d instant. The embarrassments occasioned by the late appointment of Envoys, begin now to shew themselves; and must place the Government—whether it advances towards or retreats from the object, for which they were appointed, in a delicate situation. Of the two evils, the least, no doubt...
360[Diary entry: 10 August 1799] (Washington Papers)
10. Morning perfectly clear. Wind from So. Wt. and Mer. at 75—at highest 87—and at Night 74. In the afternoon heavy clouds & fine rains all around us but none fell here.