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31[Diary entry: 10 April 1748] (Washington Papers)
Sunday 10th. We took our farewell of the Branch & travelld over Hills and Mountains to 1 Coddys on Great Cacapehon about 40 Miles. James Caudy (Coddy) owned some 98 acres of land in Frederick County. On 19 Mar. 1752 GW noted that “Pursuant to a Warrant from the Proprietors Office I have Surveyed for James Caudy of Great Cacapehon a certain tract of waste & ungranted Land on the So. Fork of...
32[Diary entry: 11 April 1748] (Washington Papers)
Monday 11th. We Travell’d from Coddys down to Frederick Town where we Reached about 12 oClock. We dined in Town and then went to Capt. Hites & Lodged.
33[Diary entry: 12 April 1748] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 12th. We set of from Capt. Hites in order to go over Wms. Gap about 20 Miles and after Riding about 20 Miles we had 20 to go for we had lost ourselves & got up as High as Ashbys Bent. We did get over Wms. Gap that Night and as low as Wm. Wests in Fairfax County 18 Miles from the Top of the Ridge. This day see a Rattled Snake the first we had seen in all our Journey. Williams’ Gap was a...
34[Diary entry: 13 April 1748] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday the 13th. of April 1748. Mr. Fairfax got safe home and I myself safe to my Brothers which concludes my Journal.
Fredericksburg, 7 July 1748 . “This Indenture made the seventh day of July in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred & forty eight Between Lawrence Washington and Nathaniel Chapman Gent. Executors of the last Will & Testament of Augustine Washington of the County of King George Gent. deceased of the one part, and Anthony Strother of the said County of King George Gent. of the other...
As its the greatest mark of friendship and esteem absent Friends can shew each other in Writing and often communicating their thoughts to his fellow companions mak⟨es⟩ me endeavour to signalize myself in acquainting you from time to time and at all times my situation and employments of Life and could Wish you would take half the Pains of contriving me a Letter by any oppertunity as you may be...
37GW to ——, 1749–1750 (Washington Papers)
I should receive a Letter or Letters from you by the first and all oppertunetys with the greatest sense or mark of your esteem and affection whereas its the greatest Pleasure I can yet forsee of having in fairfax to hear from my Intimate friends and acquaintances I hope you in particular ⟨wi⟩ll not Bauk me of what I so ardently Wish for. ADf , DLC:GW . For background to this letter, see the...
As its the greatest mark of friendship and esteem you can shew to an absent Friend In often Writing to him so hope youl not deny me that Favour as its so ardently wish’d and Desired by me its the greatest pleasure I can yet forsee of having in fairfax to hear from my friends Particularly yourself was my affections disengaged I might perhaps form some pleasures in the conversasions of an...
This comes to Fredericksburg fair in hopes of meeting with a speedy Passage to you if your not there which hope you’l get shortly altho. I am almost discouraged from Writing to you as this is my fou[r]th to you since I receivd any from yourself. I hope you’l not make the Old Proverb good out of sight out of Mind as it’s one of the greatest Pleasures I can yet foresee of having in Fairfax in...
The Receipt of your kind favor of the 2d of this Instant afforded Me unspeakable pleasure as I am convinced I am still in the Memory of so Worthy a friend a friendship I shall ever be proud of Increasing you gave me the more pleasure as I receiv’d it amongst a parcel of Barbarian’s and an uncooth set of People the like favour often repeated would give me Pleasure altho. I seem to be in a Place...
41Memorandum, 1749–1750 (Washington Papers)
When I see my Brother Austin to Enquire of Him whether He is the Acting Attorney for my Brother and as my Brother Laurence left Directions with the Hon. W. Fx to remit his Pay as Agetant whether it would not be more proper to keep it to Pay the Notes of Hands Thats Daily coming against him and to write word to Williamsburgh to Acquaint his Hon. my B:A: to write him word. AD , DLC:GW . For...
42Memorandum, 1749–1750 (Washington Papers)
Mem. To Survey the Lands at the Mouth of Little Cacapehon & the Mouth of Fifteen Mile Creek for the Gentlemen of the Ohio Com. AD , DLC:GW . For background to this document, see the editorial note to GW to Ann Washington, Sept.-Nov. 1749 , and GW to Thomas Fairfax, Oct.-Nov. 1749, source note . The Ohio Company, founded in 1747 to promote European settlement and trade with the Indians in the...
43Memorandum, 1749–1750 (Washington Papers)
Memorandom to have my Coat made by the following Directions to be made a Frock with a Lapel Breast the Lapel to Contain on each side six Button Holes and to be about 5 or 6 Inches wide all the way equal and to turn as the Breast on the Coat does to have it made very Long Waisted and in Length to come down to or below the Bent of the knee the Waist from the armpit to the Fold to be exactly as...
44Memorandum, 1749–1750 (Washington Papers)
Memorandom to Charge Mrs Ann Washington with 4/9 pd. the 20 of July to a Maryland Hou[se]wife as also Major Law: Washington with 1/3 ent[ered] the 15 of August 5/9 the 17 Do 2/6 Do. Read to the reign of K:John. AD , DLC:GW . For background on this document, see the editorial note to GW to Ann Washington, Sept.-Nov. 1749 . In an entry for 20 July 1748 in his account book, GW noted this sum as...
45Poetry, 1749–1750 (Washington Papers)
AD , DLC:GW . For background to this document, see the editorial note to GW to Ann Washington, Sept.-Nov. 1749 . Aside from the fact that this poem is in GW’s handwriting, no evidence has been found that it was of his own composition. Another fragment of a poem appears in the pages of the diary: “T’was Perfect Love before But How I do adore.”
46Poetry, 1749–1750 (Washington Papers)
AD , DLC:GW . For background on this document, see the editorial note to GW to Ann Washington, Sept.–Nov. 1749 . No evidence has been found that GW composed this work. This is an acrostic for Frances Alexander.
I hope your Cough is much mended since I saw you last, if so likewise hope you have given over the thoughts of leaving Virginia. As there is not an absolute occasion of my coming down, hope you’l get the Deeds acknowledged without Me; my Horse is in very poor order to undertake such a journey, and is in no likelihood of mending for want of Corn sufficient to support him; tho’ if there be any...
E ditorial N ote  The principal Washington documents extant for the years before 1752 are, in addition to the school exercises, a group of early surveys, a 1748 diary of a surveying expedition undertaken for Lord Fairfax in Virginia’s Northern Neck, and the journal kept by GW of his trip with his half brother Lawrence to Barbados in 1751–52. GW kept his diary entries for the Fairfax surveying...
I went Last Tuesday not knowing your Lordship had that very Day set out for Neavils to see whether you had any further Commands or directions to give concerning the Surveying of Cacapehon and as your Lordship was not at Home I was inform by Colo. G. Fairfax that you had not any Directions in Particular more than were given to the other Surveyors as your Lordship had mentioned ⟨ ⟩ therefore...
20 Oct. 1750. “The Right Honourable Thomas Lord Fairfax . . . for and in Consideration of the Composition to Me paid And for the annual Rent hereafter reserved I . . . do give grant and Confirm unto Mr George Washington of the County of King George a certain Tract of waste and ungranted Land in Frederick County, which he bought of Capt. Thomas Rutherford, known by the Name of Dutch George’s...
51[Diary entry: 4 November 1751] (Washington Papers)
November 4 th , 1751.—This morning received a card from Major Clarke, welcoming us to Barbadoes, with an invitation to breakfast and dine with him. We went,—myself with some reluctance, as the smallpox was in his family. We were received in the most kind and friendly manner by him. Mrs. Clarke was much indisposed, insomuch that we had not the pleasure of her company, but in her place...
52[Diary entry: 5 November 1751] (Washington Papers)
5 th. —Early this morning came Dr. Hilary, an eminent physician recommended by Major Clarke, to pass his opinion on my brother’s disorder, which he did in a favorable light, giving great assurances that it was not so fixed but that a cure might be effectually made. In the cool of the evening we rode out accompanied by Mr. Carter to seek lodgings in the country, as the Doctor advised, and were...
53Court Case, 3 December 1751 (Washington Papers)
3 Dec. 1751. “Ann Carrol and Mary McDaniel Servts of Fredericksburgh, being Committed to the Goal of this County by William Hunter Gent., on Suspicion of Felony, & Charged with robing the Cloaths of Mr George Washington when he was washing in the River some time last Summer, the Court having heard Severall Evidences Are of Oppinion that the said Ann Carroll be discharged, & Admitted an...
Last Night your Servt carried over what things were left also the last loaf of Double refind Sugar in my possession, if coarse single Refined will do for second rate gentry who may visit you as a Planter you may have 20 ct more. Your acct shall be transcribed as soon as possible from the beginning—but it so happens that my present Aid-du-Campe is a little intoxicated & incapable of Duty. You...
I shou’d have been down long before this but my business in Frederick detain’d me somewhat longer than I expected and imediately upon my return from thence I was taken with a Violent Pleurisie which has reduced me very low but purpose as soon as I recover my strength to wait on Miss Betcy, in hopes of a revocation of the former, cruel sentence, and see if I can meet with ⟨any alter⟩ation in my...
Being impatient to know Colo. Fitzhugh’s result; I went to Maryland as I returned Home He is willing to accept of the Adjutancy of the Northern Neck, if he can obtain it on the terms he proposes; which he hardly expects will be granted Him: The inclosed is his Letter, wherein I believe he inform’s of his intention. He told Me, he would, when conveniency admitted, build a House in Virginia, at...
17 June 1752. “This Indenture . . . Between Lawrence Washington of the County of Fairfax . . . and George Washington of the County of King George . . . in Consideration of the Natural Love & affection which he hath and Doth bear unto his Loving Brother George Washington hath Remised Released and forever quit claim . . . unto the said George Washington and to his heirs forever, all the Right...
I came Home ⟨ mutilated ⟩ Yesterday, when I re⟨ mutilated ⟩ Me with the time of Yr Brother ⟨ mutilated ⟩ neral, & desiring my Attendance. I am very sorry it did not come to ⟨ mutilated ⟩ Hands sooner; had I known it in ⟨ mutilated ⟩ I wou’d by no means have refused the last peice of Respect to the Memory of a Gentleman, for whom, when alive, I had a sincere Regard. I most heartily condole You...
Document not found: commission as adjutant for southern district, Williamsburg, 13 Dec. 1752. For background to this document, see GW to Dinwiddie, 10 June 1752, n.2 . On 6 Nov. 1752, some months after Lawrence Washington’s death, the governor and council “finding by Experience the Insufficiency of one [adjutant], fully to discharge a Business of so much Importance,” created four military...
Letter not found: to William Nelson, 12 Feb. 1753. On 22 Feb. 1753 Nelson wrote to GW : “I have received yours of the 12th Instant.”
I have received yours of the 12th Instant, in which you express a Desire to be removed to the Adjutancy of the Northern Neck. I think the Thing so reasonable that I wish you may succeed: however, I presume You are not unaquainted, that two Gentlemen have apply’d for it, & both strongly recommended; yet, Reason I hope will always prevail at the Board over Interest & Favour, upon which Principle...
E ditorial N ote  The commission from Governor Dinwiddie to GW to investigate reports that French forces were encroaching on frontier territory claimed by Great Britain marks the beginning of GW’s military career. Although both France and Britain had long entertained vague ambitions in the Ohio country, it was not until the middle years of the eighteenth century that the two powers met...
Instructions for George Washington Esqr. Whereas I have receiv’d Information of a Body of French Forces being assembled in an hostile Manner on the River Ohio, intending by force of Arms to erect certain Forts on the said River, within this Territory & contrary to the Peace & Dignity of our Sovereign the King of Great Britain. These are therefore to require & direct You the said George...
Virginia [Williamsburg, 30 October 1753 ] To All to whom these Presents may come or concern Greeting Whereas I have appointed George Washington Esqr. by Commission under the Great Seal, My express Messenger to the Comandant of the French Forces on the River Ohio, & as he is charg’d with Business of great Importance to His Majesty & this Dominion. I do hereby Command all His Majesty’s Subjects,...
On Wednesday the 31st. of October 1753 I was Commission’d & appointed by the Honble. Robert Dinwiddie Esqr. Governor &ca. of Virginia To visit & deliver a Letter to the Commandant of the French Forces on the Ohio, & set out on the intended Journey the same Day. The next I arriv’d at Fredericksburg, & engag’d Mr. Jacob Vanbraam, Interpreter, Jacob Van Braam, born about 1729 in Bergen op Zoom,...
66III., 1754 (Washington Papers)
No. 1 No. 2 No. 3 No. 4 No. 5 Peter Pharrow Abram Ned Sambo Jenny Tomboy Sando Scipio Camero Phebe Couta Lett Nell Judah
E ditorial N ote  The reports that GW made to Dinwiddie upon his return from his mission to the French commandant reinforced the governor’s conviction that no time was to be lost in taking action against French encroachment on the Ohio. Dinwiddie had held a British vessel, the Speedwell , in port pending GW’s return from the Ohio and at once notified Holderness and the Board of Trade that the...
In a conversation at Green Spring you gave me some room to hope for a commission above that of a Major, and to be ranked among the chief officers of this expedition. The command of the whole forces is what I neither look for, expect, nor desire; for I must be impartial enough to confess, it is a charge too great for my youth and inexperience to be intrusted with. Knowing this, I have too...
Letter not found: from William Trent, Forks of the Ohio, 19 Feb. 1754. A newspaper account of this letter reads: “Letters from Messieurs Trent, and Gist, to Major Washington, of Virginia, give some Account of their Situation near the Ohio. The first Letter is dated Feb. 19, at Yaughyaughgany big Bottom. The 17th Mr. Trent arrived at the Forks of Monongohella (from the Mouth of Red Stone Creek,...
Letter not found: from Christopher Gist, Monongahela, Pa., 23 Feb. 1754. A newspaper quotation of this letter reads: “An Indian who was taken Prisoner from the Chickasaws by the Six Nations some Years ago, has been this Year to see his Friends there; in his Passage up the Ohio, fell in with a Body of near 400 French coming up the River; he parted with them below the Falls, and then came, in...
Letter not found: to Robert Dinwiddie, Belvoir, 3 Mar. 1754. On 15 Mar. 1754 Dinwiddie wrote to GW : “Yr two Letters of the 3d & 7th Currt I recd.” At this time GW had returned from a largely unsuccessful attempt to raise men in Frederick County and was engaged in recruiting men and supplies in Alexandria. See also GW to Dinwiddie, 7 Mar. 1754 .
If the Vessel your Honour hir’d of Colo. Eyre has not left York, or Mr Carlyle’s Norfolk and Hampton We should be glad to have as many Tints sent up as can be spard, for there is no proper Linnen to make them of here and would be difficult to get done if there was[.] We also are much in want of Cutlasses, Halbards, Officer’s half Pikes, Drum’s &ca which I am inform’d are in the Magazine that...
In my last by Mr Stuart I slightly mentioned the objection many had against Enlisting (to wit) not knowing who was to be Pay Master, or the times for Payment: It is now grown a pretty general Clamour, and some of those who were amongst the first Enlister’s; being Needy, and knowing it to be usual for His Majesty’s Soldiers to be paid once a Week, or at most every Fortnight, are very...
Yr two Letters of the 3d & 7th Currt I recd & the enclos’d from Messrs Trent & Cresap. I am surpriz’d from their Letters that the French are so early expected down the Ohio; which I think makes it necessary for You to march what Soldiers You have enlisted immediately to the Ohio, & escort some Waggons, with the necessary Provisions; Colo. Fry to march with the others as soon as possible. I...
I was favour’d with your Honours Letter by Mr Steward, inclosing a Lieutt Colo.’s Commission; for which Promotion, I hope my future Behaviour will sufficiently testifie the true sense I have of the kindness; and as I intend strictly to adhere to all the proper Rules (as far as it is in my power) and discipline of the Profession I have now enter’d into; I am vain enough to believe, I shall not...
I wrote to you in Frederick not knowing your Intention of going to Stafford, desiring that all your Men &ca might be in readiness to March by the middle or last of next Week at furthest for Ohio: I have just receiv’d the Governers Orders (which was sent upon the Arri⟨val⟩ of Captn Trents express) to dispatch with all expedition thither, with the Men that are already raiz’d, and such Officer’s...
On the 31st of March , I received from his Honour a Lieutenant Colonel’s Commission, The date of the commission’s receipt as given here is in error. Dinwiddie wrote to GW 15 Mar. enclosing the commission as lieutenant colonel of the Virginia Regiment, “pay, 12s. 6d. per day” ( ViHi ), and GW acknowledged its receipt 20 Mar. ( WRITINGS John C. Fitzpatrick, ed. The Writings of George Washington...
Letter not found: to Daniel Campbell, 31 Mar. 1754. On 28 June 1754 Campbell wrote to GW from Falmouth: “I was agreeably favour’d with yours of the 31st March last.” Campbell was a Scottish merchant living in Falmouth. In 1753 he served as master of the Fredericksburg Masonic Lodge No. 4 A.F. & A.M. , of which GW was a member.
The difficulty of getting Waggons has almost been insurmountable, we have found so much inconvenience attending it here in these roads that I am determined to carry all our provisions &c. out on horse back and should be glad if Capt. Trent with your Assistance would procure as many horses as possible against we arrive at Wills Creek that as little stoppage as possible may be made there. I have...
It is with the greatest concern I acquaint you that Mr Ward Ensign in Captn Trents Company was compelld to surrender his small Fort in the Forks of Monongehele to the French on the 17th Instant: Who fell down from Venango with a Fleet of 360 Batoes and Canoes with upwards of one thousand Men and eighteen pieces of Artillery—which they planted against the Fort, drew up their Men and sent the...