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We the Senate of the United States, return you our sincere thanks for your excellent speech delivered to both Houses of Congress; congratulate you on the compleat organization of the federal Government, and felicitate ourselves and our fellow-citizens on your elevation to the Office of President: an Office highly important by the Powers constitutionally annexed to it and extremely honorable...
The Vice President of the United States has the honour to present his humble Opinion, on the Points proposed, for his consideration. 1. That an Association with all kinds of company, and a total Seclusion from Society, are extreams, which, in the actual Circumstances of this Country, and under our form of Government, may be properly avoided. 2. The System of the President, will gradually...
Among the Candidates for the Honour of public Employment; under the new Government there is one, whose connection in my family, and public relation to me, in the late legation to St. James’s Would render my total silence on his account, liable to misinterpretation, as proceeding, either from want of esteem, confidence, or affection for him on the one hand, or to a failure of rispect to the...
The inclosed letters are from two as respectable characters as any in Massachusetts, containing information which I hope has been transmitted to you, through other channels. But as it is possible, it may be otherwise, it is my duty to lay them before you, which I beg leave to do by the bearer Colo: Smith. With all possible deference and respect I have the honor to be, Sir your / most obedient,...
Address of the Senate of the United States to the President of the United States in answer to his Speech— We the Senate of the United States return our thanks for your Speech delivered to both Houses of Congress. The accession of the State of North Carolina to the Constitution of the United States gives us much pleasure; and we offer you our congratulations on that event, which at the same...
That New Orleans, and the Spanish Posts on the Missisippi, will be among the first attempts of the English, in case of a war with Spain, appears very probable: and that a combined operation from Detroit, would be convenient to that end cannot be doubted. The Consequences, on the western Settlements, on the commerce with the West Indies, and on the general Security and tranquility of the...
At twelve o’clock the Senate attended upon the President of the United States at his own House, when the President of the Senate delivered the following Address. To the President of the United States of America. We receive, Sir, with particular satisfaction the communications contained in your Speech, which confirm to us the progressive State of the public Credit, and afford at the same time,...
The Senate of the United States have received with the highest satisfaction the assurance of public prosperity contained in your Speech to both Houses: the multiplied blessings of providence have not escaped our notice or failed to excite our gratitude. The benefits which flow from a restoration of public and private confidence are conspicuous and important and the pleasure with which we...
Captain John of Harvard in the Massachusetts, has been recommended to me, by so many respectable characters, and in such handsome terms, that I cannot refuse his request of a Line to the President of the United States in his favour. He has the merit of long and early Services, though he is said to have been lately unfortunate. As his application is entirely out of my Department, and to a Judge...
At twelve o’Clock, agreeably to appointment, the Senate waited on the President at his House and presented the following Address. Accept, Sir, the thanks of the Senate for your Speech delivered to both Houses of Congress at the opening of the session. Your reelection to the chief magistracy of the United States gives us sincere pleasure. We consider it as an event every way propitious to the...
Resolution of the Trustees of the. Sinkg. Fund. At a Meeting of the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund on the thirtieth day of May 1794. Present, The Vice President of the United States, The Secretary of the Treasury, The Secretary of State, The Attorney General. The Secretary of the Treasury having informed the board that there was in the Treasury the sum of one hundred thousand Dollars to be...
We receive with pleasure your speech to the two Houses of Congress. In it we perceive renewed proofs of that vigilant and paternal concern for the prosperity, honor, and happiness of our country, which has uniformly distinguished your past administration. Our anxiety arising from the licentious and open resistance to the laws in the western counties of Pennsylvania, has been increased by the...
The inclosed Letters No. 6. 7. 8 and 9, especially the last, contain Information of so much Importance that, although they are written in great confidential Freedom from a Son to a Father, I think it my Duty to transmit them to you. I beg the favour of having them returned to me at your Leisure by the Post. The unnatural Effervescence against the Treaty which broke out in Boston has made...
It is with peculiar satisfaction that we are informed by your Speech to the two Houses of Congress, that the long, and expensive war in which we have been engaged with the Indians North west of the Ohio, is in a situation to be finally terminated; and though we view with concern the danger of an interruption of the peace so recently confirmed with the Creeks, we indulge the hope, that the...
We thank you, sir, for your faithful and detailed exposure of the existing situation of our country; and we sincerely join in sentiments of gratitude to an overruling Providence for the distinguished share of public prosperity and private happiness which the People of the United States so peculiarly enjoy. We are fully sensible of the advantages that have resulted from the adoption of measures...
In conformity to the intimation you were pleased to honor me with on evening last I have reflected on the etiquette proper to be observed by the President and now submit the ideas which have occurred to me on the subject. The public good requires as a primary object that the dignity of the office should be supported. Whatever is essential to this ought to be pursued though at the risk of...
Agreeably to your desire, I sit down to commit a few lines to the Post. Nothing worth particular mention has occured since your Departure; except a report brought by Mr. Keane from So. Carolina, that Mc. Gilivray the Indian Chief had, after a short conference, left our Commissioners, declaring that what they had suggested was only a repetion of the old Storey and inadmissible, or something to...
Mr. Hamilton will with pleasure execute the command of the President by the time appointed and have the honor of waiting upon him. AL , Photostat, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
The Secretary of the Treasury having, in consequence of the Act for the Establishment and support of Light houses, directed his Enquiries to that object begs leave most respectfully to submit the result to The President of the United States of America New Hampshire. In this State is only one Light house situated on a point of land on the Island of New-Castle, three miles from Portsmouth,...
The Secretary of the Treasury begs leave respectfully to inform the President of the United States of America, That, in order to be able to furnish in the course of the ensuing month for the compensation of the members of Congress, & the Officers and Servants of the two houses, a sum of about sixty thousand dollars; for the payment of the Salaries of the Civil List to the end of the present...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to inform the President of the United states of America, that he has received a letter from the Governor of Virginia intimating that it is necessary an election should be made of the particular spot upon which it may be deemed proper to erect the intended Light house on Cape Henry, after which the Cession will be completed. The said Secretary having...
The Secretary of the Treasury conceives it to be his duty most respectfully to represent to the President of the United states, that there are, in his judgment, objections of a very serious & weighty nature to the resolutions of the two houses of Congress of the twenty first instant, concerning certain arrears of pay due to the Officers and soldiers of the Lines of Virginia and North Carolina....
Treasury Department, May 28, 1790. Submits “five Contracts made by the superintendant of the Light house, piers &c on the river and Bay of Delaware” and recommends that these Contracts be approved. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects of the President of the United states and submits to his consideration some remarks on the Resolutions, which have passed the two Houses respecting the Lines of Virginia and North Carolina. The Secretary has taken this method of communication as the one best calculated to place the subject under the eye of the President with least trouble to...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor respectfully to submit to the President of the United states for his consideration, a Contract (with the letter that accompanied it) betwen William Allibone Superintendant of the Light-house, Beacons, Buoys & public Piers on the river and Bay of Delaware and Abraham Hargis, Keeper of the Light-house at Cape Henlopen. The yearly Salary of £130. altho’...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor respectfully to submit to the President of the United states, for his approbation, the enclosed Contract for timber, boards, Nails and Workmanship, for a Beacon to be placed near the Light-house on Sandy hook; the terms of which, he begs leave to observe are, in his opinion favourable to the U. States. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor respectfully to inform the President of the United states, that he has received a letter from the Collector of Charleston in South Carolina, from which he learns that some misconception has arisen as to the nature of the qualifications of Mr. Thomas Hollingsby, who on the joint recommendation of the Collector & commissioners of Pilotage for that port...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor respectfully to inform the President of the United states that the Collector of Charleston in south Carolina has stated to him, that a proposal has been made by James Robinson of Newport, Rhode Island, to the Collector, through the Commissioners of Pilotage of that Port, to supply six hundred gallons of spermaceti Oil, for the use of the Light house,...
Memorandum of the substance of a Communication made on Thursday the Eighth of July 1790 to the Subscriber by Major Beckwith as by direction of Lord Dorchester. Major Beckwith began by stating that Lord Dorchester had directed him to make his acknowlegements for the politeness which had been shewn in respect to the desire he had intimated to pass by New York in his way to England; adding that...
In my second interview with Major Beckwith which was on Thursday the 22d. instant I spoke to him nearly as follows I have made the proper use of what you said to me at our last interview. As to what regards the objects of a general nature mentioned by you, though your authority for the purpose from Lord Dorchester is out of question, and though I presume from his Lordship’s station & character...
Treasury Department, August 5, 1790. “The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor respectfully to submit to the President of the United states a contract … for shingling two houses, and building a breast-work for the foundation of the light-house at Cape-Henlopen He begs leave to offer an opinion, that the terms of this agreement appear to him advantageous to the United states.” LC , George...
The Secretary of the Treasury respectfully begs leave to submit to the President of the United States copies of a letter from Messrs. Wilhem & Jan Willink and Nicholas and Jacob Van Staphorst & Hubbard of the 25th. day of January last, and of an answer thereto of the 7th. day of May following. The President will perceive that the last mentioned letter was formed upon a plan not to discourage...
Treasury Department, August 26, 1790. “The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor respectfully to submit to the President of the United States a new contract made by William Allibone, Superintendant of the Light-house and other establishments on the Delaware, with Abraham Hargis as Keeper of the said ligh house.…” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. See Allibone to H, August...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor respectfully to submit to the President of the U. States for his determination a request from the Naval officer of the District of New York. The Secretary humbly remarks, that it appears desireable, as far as possible, to avoid absences of such important Officers for so long a duration, but that if the nature of the reasons should induce the...
Agreeably to your direction I conversed the day after your departure with the Secretary of State on the subject of an Agent for conducting the Loans to be made abroad. I stated to him, that you had expressed to me a preference of Mr. Shorts being employed, if he could be spared the requisite time from France, without injury to the affairs depending there; and that I conceived it wou’d be...
The public service appearing to require the early establishment of the boats or cutters for the protection of the revenue, agreeably to the provision made by the Legislature in their last Session, I do myself the honor respectfully to submit to you what has occured upon that subject. Cutters from forty to fifty feet keel being deemed by experienced persons the most eligible, my enquiries have...
The urgent avocations, in which I have been engaged, towards putting, in a train of execution, the laws of the last session, affecting my department, and a desire of reflecting maturely, and giving the reasons for the result of my reflections, fully, have caused me to delay, longer than I wished, the answers to the questions, with which you honored me, and I hope will excuse the delay. The...
I have the honor respectfully to inform you that on the 15th. inst: your Commission to William Winn as Surveyor of the port of Winton in N. Carolina was brought to my Office by a gentleman from that State. Conceiving it an irregular mode of procedure in a case of that nature, I have written to Mr. Winn a letter of which the enclosed is a copy. In the mean time I have deemed it my duty to lay...
Doctor Craigie has communicated to me, a letter from Mr. Daniel Parker to him, dated, London the 12th of July, which mentions that he had just seen Mr. De Miranda, who had recently conversed with the Marquis Del Campo, from whom he had learnt that the Court of Spain had acceded to our right of navigating the Mississippi. Col: Smith has also read to me a passage out of another letter of the 6th...
I have been duly honor’d with your two letters of the 18th and 20th of Septemr. My opinion on a certain subject has been forwarded, and I hope will, ‘ere this, have come to hand. Inclosed you will be pleased to receive a list of such characters, as from the documents furnished by Mr. Lear, from my enquiries, and from the intimations contained in you letter of the 20th, appear to stand, upon...
I had lately a visit from a certain Gentleman the sole object of which was to make some observations of a delicate nature, concerning another Gentleman employed on a particular errand; which, as they were doubtless intended for your ear, and (such as they are) ought to be known to you, it is of course my duty to communicate. He began (in a manner somewhat embarrassed which betrayed rather more...
I had the honor of receiving your letter of the 27th. ulto., by the mail on the 2d. inst. and have in the interval made some enquiries relative to a successor to the late Collector of George town in south Carolina. I am apprehensive from the result, that the necessary information cannot be obtained but from the place, to which end the necessary steps will be taken. I shall also make the...
I have received from Nathl. Gilman Esquire the Commissioner of Loans for New-Hampshire, a letter of the 27th. September informing me, that he has transmitted his commission to you, with a resignation of his Office. I beg leave on this occasion to call to your mind the name of Woodbury Langdon Esquire, who from my recollection of circumstances, and from the result of my enquiries to day,...
I do myself the honor to inform you, that the result of my enquiries concerning the character of Capt: Jonathan Maltbee, is, that he is a man of fair character and an experienced & good Seaman, who might be expected to execute his duty faithfully as the Commander of a revenue Cutter. I do not learn however, that either he or Capt. Law are remarkable for their activity. The principal point of...
I had the honor of receiving your letter of the 10th instant by the last post. It is certainly very possible, that motives, different from the one avowed, may have produced a certain communication; and in matters of such a nature, it is not only allowable, but the dictate of prudence, to receive suggestions with peculiar caution. A British Packet arrived yesterday. The accounts, she brings,...
I have had the honor to receive your several letters of the 12th., 13th, & 15th. inst: which finding me in the act of removal from New York to Philadelphia, I have been prevented from the due acknowledgement of their reception at an earlier moment. The Baron Perin’s claim shall be examined as soon as the Officers of the Treasury can complete the arrangement of their Books & papers, which I...
I had the honor duly to receive your two letters of the 3d and 6th inst:. The Packet for the Baron de Steuben contained in the former, was delivered to him agreeably to your direction. The papers concerning Capt. Lyde were transmitted by the post following that which took my letter of the 29th. Ulto. No more proper characters having been pointed out by further enquiry, I have, pursuant to your...
I am honored with your letter of the 25th. ultimo, relative to the office of Commissioner of Loans for the State of New Hampshire. It appears most proper that I should postpone any movement upon this subject, ’till I shall Know your pleasure after my letter of the twenty sixth of last month shall reach your hands, and you shall be ascertained of Mr. Langdon’s intentions in regard to the...
I have the honor to inform you, that a letter, of which a copy is enclosed, has come to my hands from the Loan officer of North Carolina, since the date of my last letter. On considering minutely the course of the business of the new Loans and the future operations of the Treasury, as they will affect the public stocks, it appeared necessary to the prevention of frauds by Counterfeiters and...
Since I did myself the honor to address you on the fourth instant, another letter from the Commissioner of Loans for the State of North Carolina has been received, of which a copy will be found in this inclosure. From this last communication it appears, that he is disposed to make an experiment of the office, which, I beg leave to observe, is a pleasing circumstance, both as it insures the...