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[1775] . “Your Petitioner being a man in years and being One troubled With rhumatizm and Other Disorders and being A man of Poor Sircomstance and having a Weakly Wife and a large Familey of Small Children and therefore begs of your Excelency to Give Me a Dismission from the Army for I am Not Able to go thorough the Hardships of this Winter and in Granting the Petitioner his Request You Will...
Convinced of the utility, the necessity, at all times, of a well disciplined militia, to every free state; when the united wisdom of the continent, referring to the contest with the parent kingdom, called on every colony to prepare for the most unhappy events; and the more immediate recommendations of our provincial congress demanded a diligent application to the military art; deeming the...
I have procured a Copy of Dr Savage’s Bill Which I now inclose you with the other papers, as I imagine Yr Answer may be drawn above with more convenience to you. As to the Release he sets up, ’twil be necessary to set forth where it was made by your consents, or on her privy examination in Court, so far as you are acquainted wth the Facts. it will be time enough to have the Answer agt October,...
I this Day received a Survey of 578 Acres Land for you, from Mr Thos Lewis, on the Ohio for several Assignments made to you by B. Dandrige & others which I shall keep ’till I receive your Orders about it, as I expect it must go to the Office; There is Two other Letters which I have put into the Post office to come next post; as I shall go to Hanover this Day & shall not return ’till Wednesday...
We are under some doubt whether we did not agree at the last meeting to take the Fashion of the Hunting Shirt Cap & Gaiters from you, and shall be glad to be informed by the return of Mr Johnson whether you Intend to send yours up that we may get the fashion, or that you will give your direction about the same. We are Sir very respectfully Your Most Obedt ⟨St⟩ LS , in Robert Hanson Harrison’s...
Mr Robert Rutherford has put into my hands a Letter directed to you in Wmsburg or in case of your not being there, to Colo. F. Lewis, the purport of which is to request your paying me Fifty Pounds agreeable to the tenour of a Subscription you signed and has put into my custody a Bond properly executed for repayment of said Fifty Pounds which I am to deliver on recpt of the Money—Colo. F. Lewis...
We have just recievd a letter from the Officers of the independant Company of Spotsylvania which I have herewith inclos’d; I immediately call’d together this Company and had the vote put whether they would march to Williamsburgh for the purposes mentioned in that letter which was carried unanimously. I have nothing more to add but that We are well assured you may depend on them either for that...
By intelligence from Williamsburg it appears that Capt. Collins of his Majestys Navy at the head of 15 Marines carried off the Powder from the Magazine in that City on the night of Thursday last and conveyed it on board his Vessell by Order of the Governor. The Gentlemen of the Independant Company of this Town think this first Publick insult is not to be tamely submitted to and determine with...
The County of Albemarle in General & the Gentlemen Volunteers in particular are truly alarmed, & highly incensed with the unjustifiable proceedings of Lord Dunmore, who we are informed has Clandestinly taken possession of our ammunition lodged in the Magazine, we should have attended at Fredericksburgh in order to have proceeded to Williamsburgh to demand a return of the powder, had the Alarm...
It is Immagin’d the first thing, that will Come on the Carpet at the Meeting of the Congress, Will be that, of Establishing Regular Armies throughout the Continent on pay if such a thing, Shd Take place, their is not the least doubt But youl have the Command of the Whole forces in this Collony—and in that Case, shall ever Esteem you as my greatest freind, if you’l use yr Intrest in procureing...
These Fue lines Comes to let you know that we are all Well & & & And on April 5 I Got to Gilbert Sympsons Whear I Found all the hands; & Nothing Ready but What I Gave you & Account of but the Articles hear after menched; one Cannae Made by your one [own] hands, two Do Made last year; 9 Axes so I bought one Cannae of Sympson at 20/ And one more I Got Which Made Five With my one after I had got...
I Am so well sattes fied that You have Got the Last letter that I shall Not right so Full as I should If I thought that Could fail as I give You a Full a Count of all My Prosedeurs & that the sarvents Plaged me Much At that Time Fore of them Ware gone to the Indanes town & that Day I should set out after them but Concluded To send stefenes after them & he Returnd to me Last Ni⟨ght⟩ With two of...
These lines Comes to Let you know how I go one With improven First I Cleard & got in Corn a bote 20 or 25 acares or More Which is More than I rote Before I have bult as Much as Would be praised To a bout 160 Pounds by the Men that is to prais⟨e⟩ It as the lands is hard to Clear & rail timber very Schase I find from Expearance that buld in is the Best Way I have rote so Much a bout the sarvents...
Letter not found: from Martha Washington, 15 June 1775. On 18 June 1775 GW wrote to his wife : “I have receivd your Letter of the 15th.”
Letter not found: from John Parke Custis, 15 June 1775. On 19 June 1775 GW wrote to Custis : “I have receiv’d your Letter of the 15th Instt.”
In Complyance with your Request, I have considered of what you proposed, and am obliged to give you my Sentiments, very briefly, and in great Haste. In general, Sir, there will be three Committees, either of a Congress, or of an House of Representatives, which are and will be composed of our best Men, Such, whose Judgment and Integrity may be most relyed on. I mean the Committee on the State...
In Complyance with your Request, I have considered of what you proposed, and am obliged to give you my Sentiments, very briefly, and in great Haste. In general, Sir, there will be three Committees, either of a Congress, or of an House of Representatives, which are and will be composed of our best Men, Such, whose Judgment and Integrity may be most relyed on. I mean the Committee on the State...
I n C ongress T he delegates of the United Colonies of New-hampshire, Massachusetts bay, Rhode-island, Connecticut, New-York, New-Jersey, Pennsylvania, New Castle Kent & Sussex on Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina & South Carolina T o G eorge W ashington Esquire W e reposing especial trust and confidence in your patriotism, conduct and fidelity Do by these presents constitute and...
In Complyance with your Request We have considered of what you proposed to us, and are obliged to give you our Sentiments, very briefly, and in great Haste. In general, Sir, there will be three Committees, either of a Congress, or of an House of Representatives, which are and will be composed of our best Men; Such, whose Judgment and Integrity, may be most rely’d on; the Committee on the State...
In Congress This Congress having appointed you to be General & Commander in chief of the army of the United Colonies and of all the forces raised or to be raised by them and of all others who shall voluntarily offer their service and join the said army for the defence of American liberty and for repelling every hostile invasion thereof, you are to repair with all expedition to the colony of...
Last night I was Honourd by the receipt of your Obliging Letter of 17th Instant, I shall Obey your Commands with all possible Expedition, & hope to be in philadelphia Thursday next, & wish earnestly to find you there. I must take the Liberty to entreat it of you, not to leave the Congress, until you are provided not only with all the Powers, but all the Means, their Power can bestow, if it is...
In Complyance with your Request We have considered of what you proposed to us, and are obliged to give you our Sentiments, very briefly, and in great Haste. In general, Sir, there will be three Committees, either of a Congress, or of an House of Representatives, which are and will be composed of our best Men; Such, whose Judgment and Integrity, may be most rely’d on; the Committee on the State...
I [am] verey Sorrey to Enform you I Recved a Letter from Mr Cleaveland of the 7th of June wherein he Seems to be in a good dale of destress[.] five of the Sarvents has Run a way and plagued him a good dale[.] the[y] got to the Indens towns Butt by the Esesten [assistance] of one Mr duncan a trador he has got them again and he has Sent three of them up By a Man he had hired with a Letter to My...
At a Time when the most loyal of his Majesties Subjects, from a Regard to the Laws and Constitution by which he sits on the Throne, feel themselves reduced to the unhappy Necessity of taking up Arms to defend their dearest Rights and Priviledges; While we deplore the Calamities of this divided Empire, We rejoice in the Appointment of a Gentleman from whose Abilities and Virtue we are taught to...
By Direction of the Congress I now Transmitt you severall Resolutions pass’d yesterday, by which you will Observe they have Directed Major General Schuyler to Examine into the State of the Posts at Ticonderoga & Crown Point, and of the Troops Station’d there, as also to Enquire into the Disposition of the Canadians and Indians. You will likewise find they have Directed him to Take or Destroy...
Recommend the bearer John Parke, who “is an Ensign in the 2d Battalion of the Militia here, and is desirous of serving his country as a Volunteer under you. He has frequently drawn his pen and is now resolved to draw his sword in support of the American cause.” LS , in Thomas McKean’s writing, DLC:GW . The letter is signed by Caesar Rodney (1728–1784) and Thomas McKean (1734–1817). The third...
Nothing material has occurred since you left this place, except the imperfect accounts we have of the Charlestown battle, which upon the whole seems to have nothing unfavorable to our great cause, but the loss of Dr Warren—To an infant Country, it is loss indeed, to be deprived of wise, virtuous, and brave Citizens. I hope however, still to hear, that our Enemies have lost Characters very...
This Court have had information from many respectable Persons, That intelligence is constantly conveyed to General Gage, Of all the operations pursued in this Colony for the restoration of our Liberty, by some bad men from the Province of New Hamshe, who are continually going to, and from, the Army under your Excellencys command, from thence it is carried on board the Scarboro Man of war now...
I do myself the Honor to advise your Excellency that the Connecticut Troops, that arrived in this Colony under the Command of Brigadier Wooster are encamped within two Miles of this Town. I have not yet had a Return of their Numbers[.] as soon as my Order for that Purpose is complied with I shall transmit it. Inclose You Sir a Copy of the Resolutions of the Hono: the Continental Congress of...
Transmits by order of the Rhode Island general assembly “the inclosed Vote, putting the Rhode Island Army under your Command.” ALS , DLC:GW . Henry Ward (1732–1797) served as provincial secretary of Rhode Island from 1761 to 1797. This letter apparently was sent under cover of one from Ward to Brig. Gen. Nathanael Greene, commander of the Rhode Island forces. Greene received his letter on 4...
The Congress of the Massachusetts Colony impress’d with every Sentiment of Gratitude, and Respect, beg leave to congratulate you on your safe arrival; and to wish you all imaginable Happiness and Success in the execution of the important duties of your elevated Station. While we applaud that attention to the public good, manifested in your appointment, We equally admire that disinterested...
4 July 1775. Recommends the bearer, “Mr. White, the Son of Anthony White Esq’r of New Jersey. . . . Inspired with Love for our much injured Country he now vissits your Camp to offer his Service as a Vollenteer in the Army under your Command.” Hugh Hastings and J. A. Holden, eds., Public Papers of George Clinton , 10 vols. (1899–1914; reprint, New York, 1973), 1:208–9. This letter may be...
As Pomroy is now Absent and at the distance of an hundred miles from the Army, if it can be Consistent with your Excellencys Trust & the Service to retain his Commission untill you shall recieve Advice from the Continental Congress and we shall be Able to prevail with Heath to make a Concession Honourable to himself, and Advantageous to the publick. We humbly Concieve the way would be open to...
Since my last to you by Alexander the Express nothing has Taken place in Congress that particularly Respects your Department. By Direction of the Congress I now Transmitt you by Mr Fessenden our Return Express, the Rules & Articles pass’d by Congress for the Government of the Troops under your Command, I wish them safe to hand. I have not Time to add, but that I am with much Respect, Sir Your...
You were pleased the other day to mention to Colonel Warren and me, as your opinion, that it was highly probable Gage’s Troops would very shortly attack our Army in some part or other. I believe your opinion is not ill-founded; and I am sure your Excellency will be pleased with every intimation that may, in any degree, aid you in the choice of measures tending to success and victory....
This Congress had Ordered the inclosed Resolution to be prepared and sent to Generals Ward & Thomas. but By the agreable event of your Excellency’s appointment to the Chief command of the American Army and arrival at Camp, the propriety of that Step ceases. we mean not to dictate to your excellency but presume that To Secure the health of the Army and relief for the sick, will naturally engage...
Medford [Mass.] 6 July 1775 . “Tho’ I am quite a Stranger to your Excellency, yet the peculiarity of my Situation induces me to request that you will indulge me so far as to take me under your protection at Head Quarters.” He wishes to explain his reasons in person. ALS , NjMoHP ; Sprague transcript , DLC:GW . John Fenton (d. 1785), an active and outspoken New Hampshire Loyalist, was seized by...
May it please your Excellency:—The bearer, Capt. Brown, is the officer who took the horses that came off from Bunker’s hill; you’ll please to direct said horses being delivered to his care. Mass. Prov. Congress Journals William Lincoln, ed. The Journals of Each Provincial Congress of Massachusetts in 1774 and 1775, and of the Committee of Safety . Boston, 1838. (Microfilm Collection of Early...
States “that he has received the repeated Commands of his Father, now a resident in Boston, to assist his Sister & two Brothers now at Waltham; in procuring them a pass into the town of Boston.” He requests GW to grant such a pass. ALS , M-Ar : Revolution Letters. Daniel Murray (1751–1832) of Rutland, Mass., and his family were zealous Loyalists. During the summer of 1774, Murray left his...
We inclose a Resolution of our Assembly authorising us to recommend proper Officers for the Battalion of Rifflemen to be raised in this Province, and a Letter from the Committee of York County, where a Company of an hundred Men has been raised. We therefore beg Leave to recommend Mr Michael Dowdle for Captain; Mr Henry Miller for first Lieutenant; Mr John Dill for second Lieutenant; and Mr...
Your favor of the 20 Ulo notifying your Intended departure for the Camp, we Received; and after transmitting copies to the different officers, to whom it was directed, we laid it before a full meeting of your Company this day—At the same time that they deplore the unfortunate occasion, that calls you, their patron, friend & worthy citizen from them, & your more tender connections, they beg...
Since my last to you, nothing has Taken place in Congress particularly Respecting your Department. I by order of Congress forward you the Declaration, & Address to the People of England. I must beg the favour you will Reserve some birth for me, in such Department as you may Judge most proper, for I am Determin’d to Act under you, if it be to take the firelock & Join the Ranks as a Volunteer. I...
General Folsom begs leave to lay before your Excellency a Memorandum of what is immediately wanted at Winter Hill. Viz. three Teems, 20 Wheelbarrows. two Thousand Tenpenny Nails Four, Inch Augres. A Gouge, and four Chizzles. ALS , MHi : Norcross Papers. At the end of this document GW wrote “The Committee, or Commissary of supplies is desired to furnish the above things immediately if to be...
A Maister of a vesel that Came out of Boston Saturday Night in order to Take Charge of a vesel at S[t]oneington in Coniticut Loaded with malases to Purseed to New york as he Saith his aquaintance in the Country Infor[m] that he has bin a Suspected Person & I Think it my Duty to forward him to your Exelency for you[r] Exemi[n]ation[.] I am Sir with Respect you[r] mest obeduet Humble Servt ALS ,...
I beg Leave to congratulate your Excellency upon your being appointed General of the Armies of the United Colonies; which hath given sincere Pleasure to every Friend of America, and will I hope prove glorious to yourself, and be attended with essential Advantages to your Country. The General Assembly of this Colony have the deepest Sense of the Necessity of a strict Union, and the most...
Letter not found: from the Massachusetts Committee of Supplies, 12 July 1775. On 12 July Horatio Gates wrote on behalf of GW to the committee of supplies: “His Excellency General Washington has commanded me to acknowledge the receipt of your letter dated this day from Watertown; when the application was made yesterday, to know the Quantity of Tents Boards, & Sails, that could be procured...
My friend Mr George Baylor will be the bearer of this, who has caught such a Military Ardor as to travel to the Camp For instruction in that Art, I beg leave to recommend him to your Countenance & Favor, not only on Account of his worthy Father, but from my Opinion of his own Merit. He is a Lieutent in our independant Company & has gained great Applause there by his diligent Attention to the...
Recommend “the bearer Mr George Baylor, not only on Account of the memory of his worthy Father, wth whom you was acquainted, but For his own merit . . . . His Ardor in the noble cause has drawn him to your school for instruction & emploiment as far as his services may be required.” LS , in Edmund Pendleton’s writing, CtY : Pendleton Papers. In addition to Pendleton, the letter was signed by...
Suffer me to join in Congratulating you, on your appointment to be General and Commander in Chief of the Troops raised or to be raised for the Defence of American Liberty. Men who have tasted of Freedom, and who have felt their personal Rights, are not easily taught to bear with encroachments on either, or brought to submit to oppression. Virtue ought always to be made the Object of...
I have to observe to your Excellency, That the Honorable Congress have altered the Arrangement of the Generals appointed by our Assembly, Wish the Order we adopted had been pursued, Fear Generals Wooster and Spencer will think they have reason to complain. They are Gentlemen held in high Estimation, by Our Assembly, and by the Officers and Troops under their Command. There are reasons to fear...