You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Sullivan, John
  • Recipient

    • Washington, George
  • Period

    • Revolutionary War
  • Correspondent

    • Washington, George

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Sullivan, John" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Period="Revolutionary War" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
Results 51-100 of 212 sorted by date (ascending)
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. John Sullivan, 23 June 1777. GW writes in his letter to Sullivan of this date that “I have yours of this Morning.”
In obedience To your Excellencys order we have met and Considered The Pretensions of Colo. Moylan and Colo. Bland to Rank in the Army of The United American States; And beg Leave to Report That we are Unanimously of Opinion That Colo. Moylan is Intituled to Rank in the Army before Colo. Bland; which is Humbly Submitted to your Excellencey by your Excellenceys most obedt Servants LS , in...
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. John Sullivan, 29 June 1777. In his letter to John Hancock of 29–30 June , GW says that “Sullivan informs me by a Letter just now received, that from all the Intelligence he has been able to obtain to day.”
Lincolns Gap, N.J., 2 July 1777 . Encloses a copy of a letter from his brother Ebenezer Sullivan requesting help in obtaining his exchange and wages and asks GW to use his “Influence to Relieve him if possible from the amazing Difficulties his Late Capture has thrown him into if firmness in the Field or patience under the Insults of his Savage Captors would Render him u⟨nworthy⟩ of your...
I do myself The Honor to Inclose your Excellencey a Letter from Doctor Cochran to me with a Copy of my answer; as the Doctors Letter was founded on the Complaint I Sent yr Excellencey I Esteem it my Duty to make it known to your Excellencey —when Complaints are made to me I must Take notice of them, or I must not; if the former is the Case I must Insist upon his Letters being an Insult of the...
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. John Sullivan, 6 July 1777. In his letter to Sullivan of 7 July , GW writes that “I have yours of the 5th and 6th” and that “Yours dated the 5th but I suppose meant for the 6th is come to hand.”
previous to Receiving yr Excys favor Informing that a Court of Inquiry Should Determine the matter Respecting the Comp[lain]t made by Hazen & Hall I had in order to find out the Truth of the affair appointed a Court of Inquirey the result of which I do my Self the Honor to Inclose your Excellency. You Can from this Easily Discover whether there was any foundation for this Complaint I did not...
upon Seeing Some Cloathing pass by here & knowing that my men are in a wretched Condition for Cloaths both officers & Soldiers & that we are always too far Detached from the Main Army to Draw I Ran the venture to Stop Some Riffle Frocks Some Shirts & three pieces of Cloaths which Qr Mr Sheriff has Sent a Recet for to the Cloathier Genl & will Deal them out if yr Excy aproves our having them if...
I Joined my Division Three Day Since, but am Exceeding weak & what is Still more afflicting I am Extremely apprehensive that I Shall never perfectly Recover Doctor Jones Says that my Excessive Fatigue has So much Injured The whole Nervous System that nothing but a Long Continuation of the Cold Bath Accompanied with a Strick Regimen can Restore me to a perfect State of Health—all Solid Food &...
I had the Honor yesterday of receiving your Excys favor of the 10th Instant am happy to Learn that The Army is on its march this way as I have Long been of opinion that New England is the object of Mr How—I Shall use Every method to get what Intelligence I can from the places you mention—I feel myself under the most Sensible obligation to your Excellencey for your Lenity to the prisoners I...
I had the honour of receiving your Excellency’s favor of the 14th Inst: & have notified your Approbation of the sentence against the unfortunate Majr Mullins. I have also rectified the mistake about the Pay Abstracts agreable to your Excellency’s directions. I am inclined to think your Excellency will soon hear from Mr Howe at the Southward where I beleive he is bound, & will even land though...
The Enemy having made a Descent upon Woodbridge from Staten Island & Taken about twelve of the Inhabitants and a hundred head of Cattle I Thought it would not be amiss to make Reprizals. I was Sensible that the Least movement of my Troops that way would Alarm the Disaffected who would Soon Communicate it to Staten Island I therefore gave out That I had received orders to march toward...
I have to Inform yr Excellencey that Colo. Antill gave us the Slip Day before yesterday & went over to the Enemy—his Brother officers Say they have Long Since Suspected his Intentions from the whole Tenor of his Conduct—I found a Number of p⟨apers⟩ of Intelligence among the Baggage of the office⟨rs⟩ which Shall take Care to forward to yr Excellencey as Soon as Sorted—among the Rest is a paper...
Since I Sent you the message by Major Morris I Saw Maj⟨or⟩ J⟨ose⟩ph Spear of the Militia who Came This morning from a Tavern Called Martins on the Forks of Brandywine he Came from thence to Welches Tavern & heard nothing of the Enemy about the Forks of the Brandywine & is Confident they are not in that Quarter So that Colo. Hazens Information must be wrong—I have Sent to that Quarter to know...
Colo. Bland has this moment Sent me word that the Enemy are in the Rear of my Right about two miles Coming Down. there is he Says about two Brigades of them. Yr Excy m. o. Servt he also Says he Saw a Dust Rise back in the Country for above an hour. ALS , DLC:GW .
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. John Sullivan, 19 Sept. 1777. GW in his letter to Sullivan of 20 Sept. refers to “your favr, and request of yesterday.”
Some matters Calling off your Excellencys attention After you had mentioned Something of my Resignation prevented my giving your Excy Satisfaction on that head—I therefore take the Freedom to Trouble you with a Line on the Subject I freely Confess that nothing gives me more pain than to think of Abandoning a Commander who has Studied to make me and all others as Happy as the nature of the...
my ill State of health prevents my waiting upon your Excellencey in Person. I am Exceeding Unwilling to give you Trouble: but Doubt not of your Excys readiness to do Justice to Every Person under your Command. I have been most Scandalously Accused before Congress & before the world & nothing can Totally Destroy the Effects of this Calumny but a Declaration of your Excellencey in favor of my...
Questions and Answers Questn 1st? Whether will it be prudent in our present Circumstances & Strength to Attempt by a General Attack to Dislodge the Enemy. And if it is & we unsuccessful where Shall we Retreat To. Answer  As General Howe is Reduced to Circumstances Exceeding Intricate from which nothing can Relieve him but a Successful General Action As it is the only thing he ought to wish for...
May it please your Excellency, We the Subscribers, General Officers in the American Army, beg leave to represent, That we have severally been accus’d of unsoldierly Conduct, dangerous Neglect, and other Crimes, which, had they been prov’d, must have blacken’d our Characters as Officers, and sunk us beneath the Reproaches of our Country. In Consequence of these malicious Accusations, Courts...
I do myself the Honor to Inclose you our Arrangment of the field officers of Light Horse which the Board Directed me to forward. upon a Supposition that your Excellencey would Call in their former Commissions & grant them De novo we Took the Liberty of Hinting At the Dates their Respective Commissions Should Bear—but if that is Disapprovd by your Excellencey, our opinion is that they Rank as...
Agreable to yr ordr of Last Eveng I have Consd the practicability of making an Attack upon the Enemy in Ph.—& weighed its probable Consequence in Every view That occurred to me. In order to Determine whether Such an Attempt is Likely to Succeed it is Necessary to Consider the Enemys Situation. The manner of our making the Attack on the Lines & the Mode of attack we must adopt for Carrying the...
Agreeable to your Excellenceys Commands I have Considered upon the most Suitable place to Canton the Army During the winter The Several places proposed in Councill have their Advantages and Disadvantages but that which has the Least objections ought to be fixed upon The Intention of the Board is to take that Station which will answer best to Cover the Country Refresh the Troops & Discipline...
Agreable to your Excellenceys Directions I have Considered upon the Advisability of making a winters Campaign and the practicability of making an Attack upon Philadelphia with the aid of a Body of Militia to be Called in for that purpose. Though The Attacking & carrying Philadelphia is an object much to be wished yet as the attempt carries with it an Idea of a winters Campaign I must give my...
To his Excellency Gen. Washington Commander in Chief of the American Army. Persuant to your Excellency’s Orders We have consider’d upon a proper Order of March for the Army in crossing the Schulkill & recommend that the Troops march in the following Order Viz. Part of Pennsylvania Militia under Potter first. The Baggage Stores and Park of Artillery to cross at Sweeds Ford setting off at least...
Agreable to your Excellenceys Directions I have Consulted Some of The General officers which I Thought most Capable of advising upon the proper Steps to take in our present Circumstances —They Say that they can by no means advise for or against an Attack they are fully Convinced that General Howe has his whole Force with him That if your Excellencey thinks your force Sufficient to Cope with...
When I undertook to Compleat the Bridge in So Short a Space I Expected Every article would be provided when I called but am unhappy to find that not one Single Article is provided in Season: I think the Safety and Convenience of the Army Depends upon having it Compleated as Soon as possible: I was well Convinced that Six Days would be amply Sufficient for Doing the whole provided Every thing...
Several of The General officers of the Army have been with me This morning To Consult upon Some Measure to be pursued Respecting Some Late promotions which have taken place To Their prejudice They are about meeting to make a proper Representation of their Grievances to your Excellencey and To Congress as Soon as may be in the Interim They beg your Excellencey would Defer Announcing in orders...
I am Directed by a Number of the Genl officers of the Army to Enclose your Excellency a memorial from them to Congress which they beg you to peruse & forward as Soon as Convenient—The General officers further Direct me to Inform your Excellency That The Inclosed Memorial Shows forth as well The Sentiments of the General officers absent as those who have Signed. I have the Honor to be with The...
In a Letter from Colo. Ramsey Dated the 11th Instant in the name of the Field officers at wilmington Stating the Nature of Their Claim to the Goods taken in the Brig & Setting forth the Quantity he adds This Paragraph. “A Letter was yesterday Sent to his Excellencey on the Subject Signed by all the Field Officers present it was wrote in a hurrey & I fear for want of a Deliberate & Cool Revisal...
I do myself the Honor to Inclose your Excellency the Result of The General officers Respecting the Market which I hope will meet your Excellencys approbation. I was Desired to mention to your Excellency that The people at Germantown have Large Quantities of Leather in ⟨Fuls⟩ which they are Daily taking out & Carrying to Philadelphia for Sale. Some of which Tis Said our Commy General of Hides...
After combating with all the elements and contending with every disappointment and misfortune I have so far completed the bridge that little remains but what may be done in two or three days after the plank is ready and the weather will permit. It will be of no use to keep the carpenters longer at the bridge until the weather is favourable and the plank is prepared. The erecting and securing...
I have The Honor to Inclose yr Excellencey a pitiful Letter from My Man of The Intelligent Countenance by which appellation he was well known Last Campaign & gave us the best Intelligence we Ever had. I beg your Excellencey to Let me know what answer I am to give him & whether any Thing is to be Done for him. I have heard from various Quarters that the Enemy are about Embarking & Say they are...
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. John Sullivan, 26 Feb. 1778. GW wrote Sullivan on this date : “In answer to yours of this morning.”
I Remember to have Troubled yr Excy Last Summer with Solicitations in favor of Capt. Sullivan begging your Excys influence in his behalf with Congress —at white Marsh I was informed by General Knox & by the Commissary of prisoners that Capt. Bliss was paid off that if my Brother would Come to Camp there would be no Difficulty in his receiving his money—I wrote him & he has at a most amazing...
Nothing can be more painful to me than the Repetition of a request which is known to be Disagreable to a Commander to whom America in General & myself in particular Stand So much indebted—after So polite a Refusal as I have once had I Should have Remained forever Silent upon the Subject: did not pure necessity which knows no Law Compell me to repeat my request —I Sincerely Lament my being...
I Should have Long Since wrote your Excellencey was there any thing in this Quarter worth Ingaging your attention. I found upon my Journey Home that there was not the Least probability of the Enemys attempting to Rescue Genl Burgoine & Army: I therefore went to New Hampshire where I tarried about twelve Days upon my Arrival here I found no Troops worth mentioning & by the Inclosed Return your...
In my Letter of this Day I mentioned the State of this Post: I Expect the Troops will be Soon here, if There is any Spirit Left in the New England States: but when they Arive I Shall have only one Brigr viz. Brigr Genl Cornell to assist me in taking Care of Troop So Scattered as mine must be, viz. from Point Judith to Providence on the west, & from Providence to Seconnet Point on the East;...
I beg leave to inform your Excellency that on the night of the 24th Inst. about six or Seven Hundred British & Hessian Troops at Rhode Island, embark’d on Board two Ships of War, two Tenders, & about Thirty Flatt Bottom’d-Boats, pass’d up the River & Landed before Day between Warren & Poppasquash Point; at the appearance of Day light, they march’d in Two Bodies, one for Warren, & the other for...
I beg Leave to Inform you that about four Days Since twenty one Sail of Large Transports from Newyork arrived at Rhode Island with about two Thousand troops on Board They were at first Said to be Invalids but it Now appear that they are Effectives But mostly Foreigners They have Now about five Thousand Troops on the Islands & have Seven vessels of War Sloops & Small Frigates only they have in...
I have the Honor to Inclose you the Intelligence reced from Rhode Island Last night which is not only from Good Authority but is Corroborated by Intelligence Received from various other Quarters. Three Regiments of the Enemy Encamped yesterday on Connannicut Island Three more came out & Encamped in the North part of Rhode Island next Bristol: They may have Some Design upon us but I Rather...
I had Last Evening the honor of Receiving your Excellencys favor of the 17th Instant & Shall immediately make Every preparation mentioned. I had previous to the Receipt Sent two Expresses Informing your Excy of the Reinforcements Sent by the Enemy to Rhode Island & Inclosed you the Intelligence I had obtained Those Letters must Reach Yr Excy before this. by the Last of which you will find that...
By a former Letter Sent by Express I acknowledged the Rect of your Excellenceys favor of the 17th Instant which arrived only the Evening of the 22d & Colo. Laurens arrived with your Excys favor of the 22d on the 24th Inst. two of Clock afternoon—This gave me but Little time to prepare I however Endeavoured to improve it in the Best Manner & have the pleasure to Inform your Excy that Every...
I have the pleasure to Inform you that we have already Collected a Magazine amply Sufficient for all possible Demands. The French Fleet has not yet arrived the Marquis will be in on the 29 as he writes me and we Shall be in perfect Readiness My numbers I trust will be Sufficient for the purpose if a few more old troops had been Sent on it might have been Better but Even as it is I have not a...
It is with pleasure I inform your Excellency that our preparations in this Department are as forward as Circumstances will admit, or Industry and application could make them. I submitt’d the Plan of Operations (sometime since communicated to your Excellency) to Admiral Count D. Estaign & was happy in its receiving his approbation & concurrence. Upon his proceeding to put part of them in...
I have the honor to inform your Excellency that some time since three of the enemy’s frigates quited their former stations—sailed to the North end of Rhode-Island and anchored between Dyers Island and Bristal ferry—Count d’Estaign on the 4 Inst. meditated an attack upon them, and on the 5th issued orders that two of his ships should turn the North end of Connanicut Island and give them battle....
The Count De-Estaing and myself were by Agreement to land our Forc[e]s here this Morning but I having received Intelligence early Yesterday Morning that the Enemy had abandoned the north End of the Island entirely in Consequence of the French Fleets coming up the River thought it best to push over without Loss of Time the whole of my Troops which accordingly was done —immediately after our...
In my last I had the honor to inform your Excellency of my being in possession of the enemies works on the North end of this Island, and of the arrival of a British fleet the moment we had landed, with the addition of Count d’Estain’s sailing in pursuit of them. As this last unfortunate circumstance deprived me of the assistance I had reason to expect from the French troops, I found it...
Notwithstanding the train of misfortunes (mentioned in my letter of the 14th Inst.) sufficient in number and aggravation to drepress even the spirits of fortitude and damp the ardor of enterprise, I have by the interposition of heaven and unabated industry nearly recovered from the deplorable situation of which my last contained but an imperfect description—I have by sending for supplies to...
I am honored this day by the receipt of your favor of the 16th Inst. Wherein you complain of my want of attention in giving you more frequently an acct of my situation and progress of my operations and in answer can assure your Excellency that want of interesting matter not of inclination has given rise to the suspicion—I can recieve no greater satisfaction than what arises from contributing...