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Documents filtered by: Author="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
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inclosed I have the honor to Send you a Letter which clel hamilton was going to send me from this place when I arriv’d with the detachement, and which may give you an idea of the position of the ennemy —I will try to meet and Collect as Soon as possible our forces, tho’ I am sorry to find the ennemy So far down that way—we’ll be obliged to march pretty fast if we want to attak them—it is for...
I went down to this place since the day before yesterday in order to be acquainted of all the roads and grounds arround the ennemy—I heard at my arrival that theyr Main body was betwen great and little timber creek since the same evening—Yesterday morning in recconnoitring about I have been told that they were very busy in crossing the delaware—I saw them myself in theyr boats and sent that...
To My Great Satisfaction, My departure is fixed Upon the tenth of Next Month, When I intend leaving paris, and Immediately Embarking for America—My Course will be straight to Pottowmack, and I do Most feelingly Anticipate the pleasure of our Meeting at Mount Vernon —there is Nothing New in france, But that the Affair of the free Ports is Quite Settled, and that Nothing yet Has Been done...
My Correspondance With You Will this time Be in two Volumes and Young Mr Adams, John Adams’s Son, Has taken Care of a letter which I Hope He will Safely forward —Your kind favour february the 15th only Came in the last Packet—I Need not telling You, My dear General, How Happy I was to Hear from You, and How Happy You will Make me By an Exact Correspondance and an Attention to Send the Letters...
I am to aknowledge the reception of your late favor —your excellency’s Sentiments were already known to me, and my heart had Anticipated your answer—I however Confess it gave me a new pleasure when I Receiv’d it—my love for you is such, my dear general, that I did enjoy it better (if possible) in a private Sentimental light than in a political one—Nothing makes me happier than to See a...
Altho I Write You another Private letter, I Must Confidentially Let you know My opinion Upon Matters Relative to the Society. The Captains in the Navy Have Been Much Mortified to be left out in the Institutions—they Rank as Colonels, they Have Rendered Great Services, and it is Expected Here they Will be Admitted into the Society—Some of them Came with Count d’Estaing Among Whom are Suffrein,...
Here is at lenght a Safe occasion of writing to you, here I May tell you What Sincere Concern I feel at our Separation—There was never a friend, my dear general, So much, so tenderly Belov’d, as I do love and Respect you—happy in our union, in the pleasure of living with you, in that So Charming Satisfaction of partaking any Sentiment of your heart, any event of Your life, I had taken Such an...
I am going to Consult your excellency upon a point in which I not only want your leave and opinion as the Commander in chief, but also your Candid advice as the man whose I have the happiness to be the friend—in an adress from the British Commissaries to Congress, the first one after jonhstone was excluded, they speack in the most di[s]respectfull terms of my Nation, and Country—the whole is...
Your excellency ordered me to give my opinion about these three places for winter quarters 1º the chain from about the Sculchill till betheleem—2º this from reading to lancaster—3º building hutts about and quartering in willmington. I must Confess My being prevented of fixing my Sentiments in a decicise manner by my want of knowledge about very interesting points amongs them as 1º  how far we...
Your letter december the 23d Has Safely Come to Hand, and Nothing short of the pottowmack plan Could Have Accounted with me for Your leaving Mount Vernon. I am glad to Hear You are likely to succeed, as it seems to me a Matter of Great Moment—and the part You Have taken in the Business Cannot fail, still more particularly to interest me in its success—I thank you, my dear General, for your...
Why am I so far from you, and what business had that board of war to hurry me through the ice and Snow without knowing what I schould do, neither what they were doing themselves? you have thought perhaps that theyr project could be attended with some difficulty, that some means had been neglected, that I could not obtain all the succès and the immensity of laurels which they had promised to...
It is with the Utmost Concern that I Hear My letters Have Not Come to Hand, and While I lament the Miscarriage, I Hope You do Not impute it to Any fault on My part —In these time of troubles, it Has Become More difficult to Know, or to Reach Opportunities, and How this Will be Carried I leave to the Care of Mr Payne Who Goes to London. Our Revolution is Getting on as Well as it Can With a...
I Schall make use in this particular instance of the liberty you gave me of telling freely every idea of mine which could strike me as not being useless to a better order of things. There were two gentlemen, same rank, same duty to perform, and same neglect of it who have been arrested the same day by me—as I went in the night around the piquets I found them in fault, and I gave an account of...
I Have Received Your Affectionate letter Of the 8th inst., and from the known Sentiments of My Heart to You, You will Easely guess what My feelings Have Been in perusing the tender Expressions of Your friendship—No, my Beloved General, our late parting was Not By Any Means a last interview—My whole Soul Revolts at the idea—and Could I Harbour it an instant, indeed, my dear General, it would...
What Would Have Been My feelings, Had the News of Your illness Reached me Before I knew My Beloved General, My Adoptive father was out of danger! I was Struck with Horror at the idea of the Situation You Have Been in, while I, Uninformed, and to distant from You, Was Anticipating the long waited for pleasure to Hear from You, and the Still More Endearing prospect to Visit You, and present You...
The situation we are in renders it extremely difficult to have a Settled notion of what is the best to be done, as the motions of the ennemy depend no so much of theyr circumstances in this country as of foreign events, Negotiations, or Ministerial orders which are in this time entirely unknown to us—however the prevailing idea is that they will go to new york through the jersays—how far that...
Before I leave the borders of france, I wish once more to Remind you of your absent friend, and to let You Hear that I am well and just Begining my German travels—I Have Been lately Visiting Some french towns where I Spoke grat deal about American trade, and fully Answered the views I Had the Honour to Communicate in a former letter —Now I am on my way to the deux ponts where Resides our...
here I am, My dear General, and in the Mist of the joy I feel in finding Myself again one of your loving Soldiers I take But the time of telling you that I Came from france on Board of a fregatt Which the king Gave me for my passage —I have affairs of the utmost importance that I should at first Communicate to You alone—in Case my Letter finds you Any where this side of philadelphia, I Beg You...
The last letter I Had from You is dated November the 19th, and Announces the Safe Arrival of the Asses who I Hope Will Be less frigid than those of His Catholick Majesty—Whatever Be their intrinsic Value, I Have found it Encreased in a Maryland Paper to a degree Which does Not indeed do justice to the Maltheze Merchants—and as the Estimate of the three Animals is truly Extravagant, I must tell...
The present questions are the most difficult to resolve upon that have been proposed since I have been in this army—there must be as much civil policy as Generalship in the operations of the next campaign—on the other hand our forces, stores, magazines, ressources of every kind (I mean those which we schall get in the camp) are far from being ascertained—we do’nt know how many men we may...
I Hope the time is drawing Near, when I will Receive the letter You Have Announced to Me, and while I Have the Unspeackable Satisfaction to Hear from my beloved General, I will also Gratify my Heartfelt Curiosity to know the proceedings of the Convention —May it Have devised proposals, and found in the people a disposition which Can insure the Happiness, prosperity, and dignity of the United...
I Meet with an occasion of wraïting to your excellency which I wo’nt miss by any means, even schould I be affraïd of becoming tedious and troublesome—but if they have sent me far from you for I do’nt know what purpose, at least I must make some little use of my pen to prevent all communication be cut of[f] betwen your excellency and me—I have writen lately to you my distressing, ridiculous,...