You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Lafayette …
  • Recipient

    • Washington, George
  • Correspondent

    • Washington, George

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
Results 1-50 of 222 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
your kind and Welcome letter of the 25 december is safely arrived and as my friend Bureau de Puzy has not yet sailed, he will, along with some introductory lines, Carry these my affectionate and filial thanks —no, my dear general, it never Entered my Head to attribute your Silence to any neglect of yours, and I would have Suspected European piracies, or things much more incredible, Rather than...
I Have Had some time Ago the pleasure to write you a letter the duplicate of which shall Accompany this —The intelligence Has Since Come to Us of your Having Accepted the Command of the Armies—But you will Not be the less pleased to hear of the dispositions to a fair Reconciliation on the part of the French directory which I Hope will be Reciprocated By the American Governement—To what I took...
However uncertain I am of the fate of My Letters, I am Happy in the Opportunities to Let you Hear from me, and altho’ the filial and Grateful Sentiments which from my Youth Have Animated My Heart Need Not Being Remembered to you, it is to me, while so unwillingly Separated from you a Great and Necessary Consolation to Express them—in Case you Have Received Some of the accounts of myself and...
Your Letter december the 5th Under Cover to George Has But lately Reached our Hands, and while Such delays make me more and more Lament the distance which Separates us from You, I Cannot Be easy about the fate of my part of the Correspondance—I Beg Leave, Amidst So Many UnHappy chances, to Hope that Omissions will not Be Laid on My Account and that Repetitions will Be allowed—Indeed, my dear...
This letter will be presented to You By Mr Forster whose father, The Celebrated professor and Captain Cooke’s fellow traveller Has Requested In Behalf of His Son these Recommandatory Lines—I am sure His Name Was to You a Sufficient Introduction—and in His personal merit there is also a Sufficient inducement to wish for his wellfare—Yet I should be Highly pleased to Hope that My Recommandation...
It is a Melancholy thought to Me that While I Could Be So Happy at Mount Vernon, I am Still Almost As much Separated from you as I have Been for five Years in the Coalitionary prisons—But Altho’ I Lament, yet I Cannot Repent the determination we Have Been obliged to take—Much Less on Account of My Health which Has Been Recovering fast Enough, than for the very Bad and Lingering Condition in...
I am the Happier to Be able to inform You, as I am Sure You Shall Be Happy to Hear that on the 19th September My two friends, family, and Myself Left the olmutz Bastille, and that to Morrow Morning We Shall Be on danish Territory out of the Reach of the Coalitionary Powers—in Vain Would I Attempt, My Beloved General, to Express to You the feelings of My filial Heart, when, at the Moment of...
The Gazetts have announced to me that you are a second time chosen President of the U.S. and this good news a little revives my courage, which the silence of your nation put to a new & severe test. For these six months that M. lafayette has been in the chains of the enemy, after the unheard of proscription which he experienced from his country, from which he was obliged to fly to prevent it...
( Translation ) Department of the upper Loire at Chavamac near Brioude Sir, 8t Octr 1792. Without doubt you have learnt our misfortunes—You know that your disciple—your friend has not ceased to act in a manner worthy of you, and of liberty—You know that his unalterable attachment to the Constitution which he swore to maintain, drew upon him the hatred of a powerful faction which wished to...
I have been called from the army to this Capital for a conference between the two other generals, the ministers, and myself, and am about returning to my military post. The coalition between the continental powers respecting our affairs is certain, and will not be broken by the Emperor’s death; but, altho’ warlike preparations are going on, it is very doubtful whether our neighbors will...
This is a Very different date from that Which Had Announced to You My Return to the Sweets of Private life, a Situation Hitherto Not very familiar to me, But Which I, after fifteen Revolutionary Years, I Had Become Quite fit to Enjoy—I Have Given You an Account of the Quiete, and Rural Mode of Living I Had Adopted, in the Mountains Where I was Born, Having there a Good House, and a Late Mannor...
I Most Heartly thank You for Your letter dated March the 19th, the more welcome to me, as I Had long lamented Your Silence, and was panting for News from You, My dear General, wherein I Could Be informed of every thing Respecting Your public and private Concerns—I Rejoice and Glory in the Happy Situation of American Affairs—I Bless the Restoration of Your Health, and wish I Could Congratulate...
Whatever Expectations I Had Conceived of a Speedy termination to our Revolutionary trouble, I Still am tossed about in the Ocean of factions and Commotions of Every Kind—for it is My fate to Be on Each Side, With Equal Animosity Attacked, Both By The Aristocratic, Slavish, Parliamentary, Clerical, in a Word By all Ennemies to my free and levelling doctrine, and on the other Side By the...
Give me leave to introduce and recommend to You Mr Kellerman the Son of an Able and patriot General officer in the french Service—it is Not Under the Embroidered Regimentals that we find the Greater Proportion of friends to the Revolution—for which Reason I am the Better disposed to oblige such as Have Sided with us. The National Assembly Have, whilst I was Engaged in quelling a Riotous fight...
Recevés, monsieur l’hommage de ma vive recconnoissance du brevet que vous aves eu La bonté de nous envoyer pour mr Poirey; et d’accompagner de temoignages si flatteurs d’estime et de bienveillance pour Lui, qu’ils ont mis Le comble a une satisfaction, dont j’ose dire qu’il est digne. vous nous avés fourni un moyen, que nous ne pouvions devoir qu’a vous, de lui montrer le pois que nous mettions...
What Would Have Been My feelings, Had the News of Your illness Reached me Before I knew My Beloved General, My Adoptive father was out of danger! I was Struck with Horror at the idea of the Situation You Have Been in, while I, Uninformed, and to distant from You, Was Anticipating the long waited for pleasure to Hear from You, and the Still More Endearing prospect to Visit You, and present You...
It is with the Utmost Concern that I Hear My letters Have Not Come to Hand, and While I lament the Miscarriage, I Hope You do Not impute it to Any fault on My part —In these time of troubles, it Has Become More difficult to Know, or to Reach Opportunities, and How this Will be Carried I leave to the Care of Mr Payne Who Goes to London. Our Revolution is Getting on as Well as it Can With a...
Amidst the agitations of our revolution, I have always participated in the pleasure which Mr de La Fayette found in following your footsteps, in observing, according to your example and your lessons, the means of serving his country, and in thinking with what satisfaction you would learn the effects and success of them. Permit me, to offer you the assurance of this sentiment and permit at the...
I Cannot let the packet Sail without a line from your filial friend, who, altho’ He depends on Mr Short for your information, wants to Express you those Affectionate and Respectful Sentiments that Are Never So well felt as in UnCommon Circumstances—How often, My Beloved General, Have I wanted your wise Advices and friendly Support! We Have Come thus far in the Revolution without Breaking the...
Letter not found: from the marquis de Lafayette, 5 Sept. 1788. On 29 Jan. 1789 GW wrote Lafayette acknowledging “your letter, dated the 5th of September last.”
In the Midst of our internal troubles, it is a Comfort to me that I May Rejoice in the Happy Prospects that oppen Before My adoptive Country. Accounts from America Give me Every Reason to Hope the New Constitution will Be Adopted. Permit me once More, My Beloved General, to insist on Your Acceptance of the Presidency. The Constitution as it is Proposed Answers Most of the Purposes, But, Unless...
I Have Been Requested to introduce to You Mr de Chastel de la Vallée a french Gentleman Who intends to Visit the United States, and Will probably Settle in one of them. He is Particularly Recommended to Me By the Marquis de Boüillé to Whose lady He is Related, and I Beg, My dear General, you Will Honour Him with Your Advices in His intended plan. Not knowing When this Can Reach You, and Having...
I Have Been Requested to Present to You M. de Saint fris a Captain in the french Regiment of dragoons who is Going as a traveller through the United States, and of Course wishes to Pay His Respects to General Washington. He Has Been Particularly Recommended to me, and as I don’t know When this introductory letter will Reach you and I am sure it will not Arrive Before My dispatches of a later...
I wish I Could Begin this letter With the Aknowledgement of a late favour from You, But None Having Come to Hand I Have No other Comfort But to Attribute it to ill fortune and Not to Any fault of Yours. I am so Happy to Hear from You, My Beloved General, and so Uneasy When I do not, that I Hope You Will Never Willingly deprive me of a Satisfaction so dear to me, Yet so short of the Happy...
Your letters Become More and More distant, and I Anxiously Wish for your Speedy Appointement to the Presidency, in order that You May Have a More Exact Notice of the Opportunities to Write to Me. This Will not tell you Much of politics. The two Imperial Courts are preparing for a Vigorous Campaign Against the turks. Russia intends Sending a Squadron into the Mediterranean, and altho’ it does...
I Have writen to You By way of England, and will only inclose a duplicate of the arrêt of the Council and letter to Mr Jefferson which I Hope May Serve the Commerce of the United States —I Am the More wishing for an Encrease of intercourse Betwen the two Nations, as Mr Jefferson and Myself Have pledged ourselves with the Ministry that it would Be the Case. And indeed it is Equally Necessary to...
I am fortunate in this Opportunity to wish you a Happy New year, and to devote the first Moments of this day to the Heartfelt pleasure to Remind you, My Beloved General, of your Adoptive Son and Most Affectionate, devoted friend. I Beg you will present My Best Respects to Mrs Washington. Madame de Lafayette joins in the Most tender Compliments to you and to Her and I Hope, My dear General,...
This letter will Be delivered By Mr du Pont the Son of a Very Sensible and Honest Gentleman, who Has Been Much Emploied in Affairs of Administration, and is Now Very zealously Engaged in drawing Up A Report for our Commercial affairs. His Son Goes out for His instruction, and With a wiew to fit Himself for future Emploiement. I Beg leave to Recommend Him to Your patronage and Advices, and am...
I Have a few days Ago writen to You By M. de Moustier the New Minister from this Court. He is a Sensible and Honest man with whom I think that the people of America will be satisfied. He is Very desirous to be presented to you, and I Have invited Him in Your Name to Mount Vernon, as well as Madame de Brehan, a very agreable lady, His sister in law, who Goes out with Him. inclosed is, my dear...
I Hope the time is drawing Near, when I will Receive the letter You Have Announced to Me, and while I Have the Unspeackable Satisfaction to Hear from my beloved General, I will also Gratify my Heartfelt Curiosity to know the proceedings of the Convention —May it Have devised proposals, and found in the people a disposition which Can insure the Happiness, prosperity, and dignity of the United...
I Have Received Your first favour from Philadelphia with the Greater Satisfaction, as it promises me the pleasure to Hear Again from you Before long —a pleasure, My Beloved General, which Your friend’s filial Heart wants to Anticipate, and Enjoys most Affectionately—I Have not Been surprised to Hear of Your Attendance at the Convention, and would indeed Have wondered at a denial—on the success...
Altho’ I Cannot omit an opportunity of writing to You, my letter will not Be so long and Minuted as I would like to make it, Because of the Constant Hurry of Business occasioned By the Assembly—every day, Sundays excepted, is taken up with General Meetings, Committee’s, and smaller Boards—it is a pretty extraordinary sight at Versailles, the more so as great deal of patriotism and firmness Has...
The last letter I Had from You is dated November the 19th, and Announces the Safe Arrival of the Asses who I Hope Will Be less frigid than those of His Catholick Majesty—Whatever Be their intrinsic Value, I Have found it Encreased in a Maryland Paper to a degree Which does Not indeed do justice to the Maltheze Merchants—and as the Estimate of the three Animals is truly Extravagant, I must tell...
It is I Hope Easier for You to Conceive than for me to Express the Painful Sensations I feel, when the long Waited for Opportunity of Hearing from You, Happens at last to Arrive without one line of Yours. the Regularity of Packets is now Reestablished, and they will Return to the Havre the Nearest Port to Paris. This will be entrusted to Colonel franks, who is Coming from a Successfull...
To one who So tenderly loves You, who So Happily Enjoyed the times We Have past together, and Who Never, on any part of the Globe, Even in His own House, Could feel Himself so Perfectly at Home, as in Your family, it Must Be Confessed that an irregular lengthty Correspondance is far insufficient—I Beseech You in the Name of our friendship, of that Paternal Concern of Yours for My Happiness,...
This Will Be presented By Mr le Coulteux a Relation to the Respectable House of french Merchants By that Name who is Going to Settle in America—I Beg You to Honour Him With Your patronage and Advices. Not Knowing when this Will Reach You I only add My Respects Most Affectionate to Mrs Washington—Remember me to George, to the Young ones, to all friends. A treaty of Commerce is Signed Between...
While I Have to lament the distance which separates us, it is an additional, and an Heartfelt Mortification for me, to Hear so seldom from My Beloved and Respected friend—and Among the Many Reasons I Have to wish for a Greater intercourse Between my two Countries, I don’t forget the Hope that More frequent Opportunities will increase the Number of your wellcome letters—this is Going By the...
The inclosed, my dear general, is a vocabulary which the Empress of Russia Has Requested me to Have filled up with indian Names, as she Has ordered an Universal dictionary to be made of all languages—it would greatly oblige Her to collect the words she sends translated into the several idioms of the Nations on the Banks of the Oyho—presley Nevill and Morgan at fort pitt, general Mullemberg in...
Your letters September the 1st and November the 8th Have Safely Come to Hand for which I offer you thanks the Warmer and More affectionate as nothing, while we are separated, Can so much Rejoice Your friend’s Heart as the unspeakable Blessing to Hear from His Beloved General—a long time Has elapsed since which my letters Have Been unfrequent, Uninstering, and Uncertain in point of...
This letter Has been Requested of me as an Introduction for Mr André Michaux whom for Many Reasons I am Very Happy to present—in the first place I Know you will Be Glad to Know a Man whose Genius Has Raised Him Among the Scientifick people, and who, as a Botanist, Has at His own Expense travelled through Countries very little Known—He Now is Sent By the King to America, in order to Know the...
Before I leave the borders of france, I wish once more to Remind you of your absent friend, and to let You Hear that I am well and just Begining my German travels—I Have Been lately Visiting Some french towns where I Spoke grat deal about American trade, and fully Answered the views I Had the Honour to Communicate in a former letter —Now I am on my way to the deux ponts where Resides our...
My Correspondance With You Will this time Be in two Volumes and Young Mr Adams, John Adams’s Son, Has taken Care of a letter which I Hope He will Safely forward —Your kind favour february the 15th only Came in the last Packet—I Need not telling You, My dear General, How Happy I was to Hear from You, and How Happy You will Make me By an Exact Correspondance and an Attention to Send the Letters...
This is not the only letter You Will Get from me By this packet, But as the opportunity is Safe, I will trust Young M. Adams With Some Matters Which I would not like to Be Ventured in the post offices of France. 102 ⟨Protestants⟩ in 12 ⟨France⟩ are under intolerable 80 ⟨Despotism⟩—altho’ oppen persecution does not now Exist, yet it depends upon the whim of 25 ⟨king⟩; 28 ⟨queen⟩, 29...
To My Great disappointement I Had no letter from You By this packet—it is However the only Regular Way to Get intelligences, and Mercantile Opportunities are not By far So much to Be depended on—I warmly Beg, my dear General, you will not let me Be Uneasy for want of a line from You—the distance is already so great in itself, and So much Greater for the feelings of the tenderest friendship,...
every mark of your kindness, is very precious to me, and amidst all my feelings at the marquis’s return, I received an additional joy, by the obliging Letter, he brought me from you. I hope that during this Late stay at mount vernon, where he was so happy, he has found an opportunity, in some of your conversations, about domestic Life, to mention his wife and his children, and speak to you of...
Your letter december the 23d Has Safely Come to Hand, and Nothing short of the pottowmack plan Could Have Accounted with me for Your leaving Mount Vernon. I am glad to Hear You are likely to succeed, as it seems to me a Matter of Great Moment—and the part You Have taken in the Business Cannot fail, still more particularly to interest me in its success—I thank you, my dear General, for your...
After a pretty tedious passage of thirty days we Have Safely Arrived at Brest, from whence I Came to paris through Rennes, where the States of Britanny were Assembled, and where their kindness to me Made it Necessary for me to Stop one day—My family, wife, children, and friends I found in perfect Health—the politics of Europe are not in a tranquil Condition, and from their situation a...
I Have Received Your Affectionate letter Of the 8th inst., and from the known Sentiments of My Heart to You, You will Easely guess what My feelings Have Been in perusing the tender Expressions of Your friendship—No, my Beloved General, our late parting was Not By Any Means a last interview—My whole Soul Revolts at the idea—and Could I Harbour it an instant, indeed, my dear General, it would...
I Shou’d think myself much Obliged to Your encellency if through Your Means Some of the Following Seeds might be Procured From KentucKé for the Use of the King’s Garden—Viz., The Seeds of the Coffe Tree which Resembles the Black oak Do of the Pappa Tree Do of the Cucumber Tree Do Black berry Tree Do Wild Cherry Tree Do Buck-Eye Tree Do of Wild Rye, Buffalo Grass—Shawanese Salad—Wild...
On My Arrival at Boston I Have Been So kindly Received that No Words Can Express My lively, Affectionate Gratitude—to those Enjoyements I Have added the Heartfelt pleasure to Contemplate the Effect, a Sudden Appearance of your picture, Had Upon a people whose love to You is as Great at least as in Any part of the World —Circumstanced as I am Here, I Could not with Any propriety set out So Soon...