George Washington Papers
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To George Washington from Major General Lafayette, 28 September 1778

From Major General Lafayette

Boston 28th September 1778

dear general

The News I have got from france, the Reflexions I have made by myself, and these which have been Suggested to me by many people, particularly by the Admiral, increase more than ever the desire I had of Seeing again your excellency—I want to Communicate you my Sentiments, and take your opinion upon my present Circumstances—that I look upon as of An high moment to my private business and feelings—on the other hand I have some ideas, and have got some intelligences upon public interests, which I Am very desirous of disclosing to your excellency—I am Sure, my dear general, that your Sentiments upon my private Concerns are such, that you will have no objection to my Spending Some hours with you.

The moment at which the fleet will be Ready is not very far, and I think it of importance to have settled my Affair with you before that time—I am going to write to general Sullivan on the subject, and if he has no objection, I’ll go immediately to headquarters—but schould he make difficulties I beg you would send me that leave1—I intend to ride as an express in Changing horses on the Road that I Might have time enough—you may think, my dear general, that I do’nt ask, what I Never ask’d in my life, a leave of quitting the post I am sent to, without Strong Reasons for it—but the letters I have Receiv’d from home Make me very anxious of Seeing you. With the Most tender affection and highest Respect I have the honor to be dear general Your excellency’s Most obedient humble Servant

Lafayette

ALS, PEL.

1Having written John Sullivan for this purpose on this date and not having received an answer from him during the next three days, Lafayette wrote d’Estaing on 1 Oct. that he was treating Sullivan’s failure to reply promptly “as though he had written me four pages of approbation, and I translate the silence as consent” (Lafayette Papers description begins Stanley J. Idzerda et al., eds. Lafayette in the Age of the American Revolution: Selected Letters and Papers, 1776–1790. 5 vols. Ithaca, N.Y., 1977-83. description ends , 2:186, n.2). In the letter that GW wrote to Sullivan on 4 Oct., he specifically directs that Lafayette be allowed to come see him, but by that time the marquis was already on his way. Lafayette met GW at Fishkill either later on 4 Oct. or the next day, and remained there with him at least until 6 Oct. before proceeding to Philadelphia (see Lafayette to Lord Carlisle, 5 Oct., in Lafayette Papers description begins Stanley J. Idzerda et al., eds. Lafayette in the Age of the American Revolution: Selected Letters and Papers, 1776–1790. 5 vols. Ithaca, N.Y., 1977-83. description ends , 2:187–89, and GW to Henry Laurens, 6 Oct.).

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