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Documents filtered by: Author="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
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I had this Morning the honor of writing to You By general heath’s express and inform’d you that we had from every official and private quarter minuted accounts of the ennemy’s Coming in Great force to attak this island—for my part, I have been long time a disbeliever of the intelligence—But So many letters Came to hand that at lenght I was forc’d to take the General opinion about theyr...
Your letter of the 22d Came to hand last evening and I hasten to answer At least to a part of its Contents—I Shall Begin By the disagreable disappointement I met with on Account of our cloathing—inclos’d, my dear General, you will find the Return of what has been put on Board of the fleet which I have sent By a vessel to providence, and which will be forwarded to head quarters as soon as Mr...
In consequence of a note from me the Admiral came to last evening, and defensive ideas gave way to offensive plans—our conversation was long and is not yet ended—But I hasten to write you a summary of what past Between the Count, the Chevalier, and myself. I first began in my own name to give them a pretty exact account of the situation we were in three months ago, of the super natural efforts...
Your letter to Count de Rochambeau mentionning the ennemy’s embarkation, and your future movements against Newyork, a positive letter from Governor Trumbull, and a positive one from General Parsons, have once more altered the dispositions, and such of the Militia as had been dismiss’d have been again sent for. in Consequence of those expectations my offensive arrangements have been entirely...
After having Stated the few facts that have taken place Between this and the last Meeting of General Officers, and after having given to the Council a Return of the Ennemy’s and our own force on this Continent, Your Excellency wishes to know what plan in our present Circumstances and in the Suppositions we Can Make & would think Better to pursue. In Case we have that Naval Superiority which We...
You very well know that for Many and Many Reasons Both on account of the Country and on that of the french, I think it very important, nay I might say politically necessary that some thing Brilliant Be at this time perform’d By our troops—to those motives Which are very strongly impressed on My Mind, and which I Might More fully explain in A Conversation, I will add, My dear General, that I...
I alwais forgot mentionning to you what has past Betwen duke of Lauzun and Myself on account of the diminution that had been made in his horses—From what he told me I saw that it has been put upon this footing that you thought a greater number of horses than was necessary for carrying letters &c. would be quite useless—I explain’d the matter to him, told him you had decided that no less than...
to My Great disappointment Mr P—— is Return’d this Morning and Brings no details with him—I Wanted him to Go Again, But You alone Can induce him to do it—from what he Says, the Ennemy are going to undertake A great Movement—he will himself wait on you and tell you what had been Said to him about Rhode island, and what about improving the opportunity of theyr fleet’s going to London—tho I do...
Mr Ward’s Corps being situated on the end of Bergen Neck, two and thirty Miles from our Army, Major lee Begun to move yesterday after noon and to execute the plan which he had propos’d; he march’d Conceal’d through the woods so as to Arrive on the Ground By the Breack of the day. he had with him his own Corps, Mjor Parr’s Riflemen, and a piquet of lighter infantry under Captain Abbot. having...
from Major Lee I just now hear that he has seen a man who has been in Newyork and told him that an embarkation has certainly taken place, said to be going to Virginia—that he got the intelligence in the City on Monday last, and that dragoons were on Board. A young man that went into the City has lately sent word to his family that he had been press’d on Board a fleet which was going to sail....
From what you have heard from dr hagen about the Boats when on your way to head quarters, I don’t Believe that you may have kept any hope for our succes—the Boats have been it seems Reduc’d to five, and from the time when they were yet at the little falls you May see that they Could not be here at the appointed hour. I will not permit Myself to Reflect on this Moment upon the Many Blunders...
I am sorry to hear from Major Gibs that My letter of last Night did not Reach you Before your departure from head quarters—it had been written at one o’clock, as soon as I took my position for the Night, and intrusted to Clel Ogden who promis’d to send it By an officer acquainted with the Roads. depending upon your Communication of the sad intelligence to Cher de la luzerne, I did not send to...
if I have properly understood your letter you had not an immediate occasion for me, and the matters you wanted to talk of with me are not to be so soon put in execution as to Require my going this day to head quarters—I have therefore differd the Moving of my troops and that of my person till to morrow—if on the Contrary there was the Least occasion for my going to head quarters I Beg you will...
In our Conversations upon Military operations, you often have told me that Since the Beggining of the Campaign Your Eyes were turn’d towards a project upon which I generally agree in Opinion with you, and Beg Leave to offer some Observations. Far from Lessening My desire of finishing the Campaign By Some Brillant Stroke, the project of Staten island, tho Miscarried, has strengtened My opinions...
In consequence of your Excellency’s orders, I am to Give you my opinion upon these three points. 1st when it will be proper to go into Winter Quarters. 2d where there Winter Quarters are to be taken. 3dly If any thing further may be done to oppose the Enemys operations in the Southward. The Month of November being generally good in America, I would not advise your Excellency to go into Winter...
Here is a letter from Mercereau which says very little, and the little which is said in it I don’t take to be true—But thought I had better send his scroll to head Quarters—I have sent him word that there was no monney for such intelligences as these. Captain Ogden told me that one of our Jersay spies had lately writen to you—I have directed him to go to head quarters and report of some thing...
From Doctor B urnet I have Receiv’d intelligence that there has been a very hott press in Newyork, and that Admiral Rodney is going to sail—If we Believe the Report, the Mayor himself was with the press gang and the Cartmen were taken in the streets which shows that they are in hurry to set out—I am taking the Best Measures I Can to hear from the islands, But nothing may be so certain as the...
In revolving into My Mind the chances of discovery By the Moon light, and on the other hand the inconveniences of staying longer than you wish under our tents, I have thought if there was some position which might enable us to take the advantage of the first hours in the Night—how far the sending of the pensilvanians towards Aquakanac, and going ourselves to the Hakinsac position may awaken...
On My Return from your quarters, I found here one of my spies from Newyork, and after having taken down his information I have sent him again to the ennemy’s lines from which he is to Bring fresh intelligences on Wenesday Morning—the fellow is sensible enough, but how far we may depend upon him I Cannot tell. he left Newyork Friday evening, and on Saturday was at Bergen point—The British Army...
A Man is just Arriv’d at My quarters who says that the Cork fleet Arriv’d in Newyork on Sunday last—his informant saw himself thirty six vessels Coming up—the Man adds that Gnl Smith is gone to the City and suppos’d to embark with this late envoy of troops—But I don’t put a perfect dependance on what he says nor on the inclos’d letter he has Brought me from Merc ereau —I am sure that the...
I have Receiv’d three different Accounts from Newyork, and tho’ the Authorities Are Not unquestionable—I will lay them before you that we May Compare them with other Accounts. A man Sent in By dr Burnet Says that part of the Cork fleet is Arriv’d, betwen twenty and forty Sails—that the Rest is given over for lost—the troops in Newyork about 1500—at Bergen 250—there was an alarm on the 15th at...
We Arriv’d last Night at this place and was much favor’d By the Weather in our Recconnoitring of the island where, I Confess, my feelings were different from what I had experienc’d when looking at these forts with an hopefull Eye—I saw the fatal Centry Clel Gouvion alluded to on an Upper Battery of Jeffery’s hook—I also saw a Small vessel playing of this hook, But quite a trifling thing...
I will for this time write a very short letter to You, and Cannot be more particular either on public or private Business, untill some few days stay in this City have enabl’d me to get further informations. I have been greatly disappointed in my not Meeting Mrs Washington—I have been very angry with my Bad fate which led me into an other Road at the only moment when I Could Miss her—This has...
However acquainted I may be with our intentions, I thought upon the whole that I should Better wait for your approbation Before I present any opinion of yours to the Spanish or French generals in the West indies. I will, I know, loose the opportunity of the Confederacy, But many vessels are going that way and if my letters meet with your approbation I shall send them By triplicates—I...
By My letter of yesterday I have Mentionn’d to You that a Spanish Expedition was intended Against St Augustine—They Mean to set out at theEnd of december which will Certainly delay them till the Middle of january—it consists of twelve ships of the line, some frigats, Bomb ketches, and a large Number of troops—I have advis’d the Minister to Communicate officialy to you this intelligence, and...
You will be surpris’d to hear that other vessels are arriv’d from France, and that we have not receiv’d by them any public nor private dispatchesall the pacquets were on board the Ariel who was dismasted in the storm and put back into L’orient—Mr de Vauban who was intrusted with these letters thought it not advisable for himself or his pacquets to come on board of Merchant vessels and very...
I have Not Yet Receiv’d Your Answer to Any of My letters. Since My last No News have Come to hand. I hope we shall Soon Some Way or other hear from france. After Many debates Congress have elected Clel Laurens as An Envoy to france—But he still Refuses to Go and thinks Hamilton Ought to be Sent. How this will end I do not know—doctor Franklin has a party Against himI think it would be very...
Your favor of the 8h inst. Never came to hand Before last Night. My former letters will have explain’d to you my sentiments Relating to a journey south ward. I Most heartly thank You, My dear General, for the kind and friendly letters you have been pleas’d to send to me. I am so happy in your friendship that every mark of Your affection for me Gives me a degree of pleasure which far surpasses...
None of Your Answers to my several letters has Come to hand. I am told that you have writen to Congress Giving an Account of a Large embarkation Under Knypausen. How far it will influence your projects, and of course your Advices for my private Conduct I hope to know By your Next letter. A vessel is, it is said, Arriv’d in Boston After a short Passage from france. her dispatches have Not yet...
Clel Laurens having Been Appointed By Congress to Go to France and Sollicit succours for the Next Campaign he has also been directed to take your orders at head quarters. I am By order of Congress to have A Conference with him, and intend Giving him Many letters for france. As in your instructions to Laurens the presence of one who Knows these people May be Agreable to You, I Shall set out for...
As you will Receive a letter from Gal St Clair Who had been desir’d by Congress to Go with me to the Pensilvania line, I have Nothing to add But that I am here with him, and that I Impatiently wait for Your Arrival which has been Announc’d by Mjor Fishburne on his Going through this place. This Affair is the More Serious as the Men have Appointed a Committee Compos’d of Theyr Ring Leaders...
Your letter of yesterday is just Come to Hand, and its Contents shall Be ponctually obei’d—the Addition of a Pennsylvania detachement would Be very Advantageous, and I will try to get it under the Circumstances and in the way which you have pointed out—I Had already writen to the Commanding officer of the jersay troops Respecting the detachment, and to Colonel dayton to Request...
Since writing the inclosed, My fears are gone a way And The 64 has Vanished into the frigat the Iris—the Importance of the Thing, and perhaps the Mistrust of My first judgement in occasions upon which I am personally Sanguine Had Been the Reasons of My Being so particular—They will still influence the precaution I take of sending you the Man, But He is such a fool or such a knave that His...
The Heavy Rain we Had And the Extreme Badness of the Roads Have Much Added to our difficulties—But the troops Have Marched with Great Chearfulness and order, and will Be to morrow Very Early at Morristown. They will arrive at Trenton the 28th, and as I set our to morrow for Philadelphia I will take Care to Have Boats provided for them. I Have Spoken most Particularly to Colonel Dayton...
Inclosed I Have the Honor to Send An Intelligence that is just Now Come to Hand—Whatever May Be the Object of this Expedition, it will Be Highly Important for Duke of Lauzun’s Legion to Hear of it As Soon As possible. Lauzun May Be at Rhode island—His Lieutenant Colonel is Also a Very Good officer. Mons. de Murnan Will Be the Bearer of this And Ride Day and Night—Having No Men And Believing...
Your letters of the 25th and 26th are Both Come Yesterday to Hand, which shows that the Expresses Have Not Made Great dispatch. I would Have done Myself the Honor of writing to Your Excellency, Had I not Every Minute waited for Intelligences from the South ward. Your Excellency Remembers that our shortest Calculation on the Arrival of the troops at Head of Elk was for the 6th of March. I am...
Having Been Impowered By Congress, the Board of War and the Virginia delegates to oppen Any Letter directed to them, I also took the liberty of Reading that of Baron de Stubens to Your Excellency wherein I found Useful intelligences. My presence had been necessary to forward every Article from philadelphia—as soon as it Could Be spared I came here with all possible Speed—But notwithstanding...
Contrary Winds, Heavy Rains, Disappointments of vessels And Every Inconvenience to which we Had No Remedy Have Been from the day of My Arrival Combined Against our Embarkation. I Hope However we will Be on Board to Morrow Morning, and As Nothing Certain Has Been Heard from the french Ships, No time will be Lost on our part for the Celerity of the Expedition. The troops will embark five Miles...
Your letter of the 1st Inst. did Not Come to Hand Untill Last Evening, and I Hasten to Answer to His Contents, tho’ I will in a few Hours Be Better able to inform you of My Movements. From what I Hear of the difficulties to Convoy us down the Bay, I very much Aprehend the Winds will not permit any frigate to Come up. Comte de Rochambeau thinks His troops Equal to the Business, and wishes that...
Here I am at the Mouth of Elk River and the fleet under My Command will proceed to Annapolis where I am Assured they Can go without danger. They are protected By the Nesbitt of Twelve guns, Some Field pieces on Board the Vessel that carries Clel Stevens, and we are going to Meet one eight guns, and one six guns Vessel from Baltimore——With this Escort We May go as far As Annapolis—No Vessel of...
The Number of Small frigats and Privateers that Are in the Bay Has Made it impossible for me to Carry the Detachement farther down than Annapolis, and I Have Requested the Governor of Maryland as well as the principal officers of the detachement to give out that we were going to join General Greene. But the object of the Expedition is so perfectly known every where that our Sole dependance to...
By Former Letters, Your Excellency Has Been Acquainted with My Motions From My Arrival at the Head of Elk, to the time of My Landing at this place. The March of the Detachement to Elk Had Been Very Rapid and performed in the Best order—Owing to the Activity of Lt Clel Stevens a train of Artillery Had Been provided at Philadelphia, and Notwistanding Some Disappointements, Namely that Relating...
My Letter of the 23d to Your Excellency will, I Hope, Be Safely transmitted, and the Bearer of it Mjr McLeane Assured me that in case He was obliged to loose the Dispatch Boats, He Could find Means to Get a Shore and forward the Dispatches By Land. In this Letter I Gave to Your Excellency an Account of what Had past Since I Left Annapolis, and Communicated the Intelligence of a British fleet...
As I Hope My letters of the 23d and 25th Have Been Safely transmitted and this will Be Accompagnied By a letter of the Same date forwarded through the Hands of the President of Congress, I Shall only Add such parts of My Information as I Mean to Be Confidential. From My Late Intelligences I am led to Suppose that our Allies Are Gone to Cape Fear—the first Engagement was in their favor and I am...
By Intelligences just Received I Hear that the British fleet Have Returned to Lyn Haven Bay, and that they were Accompagnied By A Number of Vessels Supposed to Be transports from New-york. From A Conversation with A Gentleman who Having Been taken a few days Before the Engagement was during the Action on Board the Charlestown frigat, I Have Got A particular Account of What Has past in that...
Your Excellency’s Letters of the 5th and 6th Inst. are just Come to Hand, and Before I Answer to their Contents Beg Leave to Give You a Summary Account of the Measures I Have Lately taken— As to the Part of My Conduct You Have Been Acquainted with, I am Happy, My dear General, to find that it Has Met With Your Approbation. When the Return of the British Fleet put it out of Doubt that Nothing...
Agreably to Your Excellency’s permission Major Troop Has My Leave to Return to the Army. The Commanding officers Have Represented that He was under Indispensable Necessity to go, and we can very well do without Him untill the aArrival of an other Major. Colonel Vose is, I am told, Very Desirous to Return to the Army. He has there a Regiment, and Before we join general greene our Bataïllons...
By My Letter of the 8th Your Excellency will Have known of My Arrival at this Place and the Preparations I was Making to Proceed South ward. I took at the Same time the Liberty to Inform You that the Great want of Monney, Baggage, Cloathing, Under Which Both officers and Men are Suffering and the Hope they Had of Being furnished with a Part of these Articles from their States would Render it...
This Letter will be delivered to Your Excellency by Capt. Rochefontaine who is joining the grand Army and will leave this Corps with the few Sapers and Miners we had taken from West Point—I dont apprehend they may be useful to us, and it would have been very inconvenient for them to be seperated from their Corps where they are to receive every kind of supply. with the highest respect—I have...
Owing to a very Heavy Rain and a Most Stormy Night I was yesterday obliged to Counter Mand the orders I Had Given to the troops, and Upon the Representation that the Roads to the Susquehana would be Impassable, I differed our departure to this Morning—We shall encamp on a Ground Near the Ferry and Be as Expeditious as possible in Crossing the River—In Consequence of Your Excellency’s...