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Documents filtered by: Author="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
Results 201-222 of 222 sorted by date (ascending)
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I Have Been Requested to introduce to You Mr de Chastel de la Vallée a french Gentleman Who intends to Visit the United States, and Will probably Settle in one of them. He is Particularly Recommended to Me By the Marquis de Boüillé to Whose lady He is Related, and I Beg, My dear General, you Will Honour Him with Your Advices in His intended plan. Not knowing When this Can Reach You, and Having...
In the Midst of our internal troubles, it is a Comfort to me that I May Rejoice in the Happy Prospects that oppen Before My adoptive Country. Accounts from America Give me Every Reason to Hope the New Constitution will Be Adopted. Permit me once More, My Beloved General, to insist on Your Acceptance of the Presidency. The Constitution as it is Proposed Answers Most of the Purposes, But, Unless...
Letter not found: from the marquis de Lafayette, 5 Sept. 1788. On 29 Jan. 1789 GW wrote Lafayette acknowledging “your letter, dated the 5th of September last.”
I Cannot let the packet Sail without a line from your filial friend, who, altho’ He depends on Mr Short for your information, wants to Express you those Affectionate and Respectful Sentiments that Are Never So well felt as in UnCommon Circumstances—How often, My Beloved General, Have I wanted your wise Advices and friendly Support! We Have Come thus far in the Revolution without Breaking the...
Amidst the agitations of our revolution, I have always participated in the pleasure which Mr de La Fayette found in following your footsteps, in observing, according to your example and your lessons, the means of serving his country, and in thinking with what satisfaction you would learn the effects and success of them. Permit me, to offer you the assurance of this sentiment and permit at the...
It is with the Utmost Concern that I Hear My letters Have Not Come to Hand, and While I lament the Miscarriage, I Hope You do Not impute it to Any fault on My part —In these time of troubles, it Has Become More difficult to Know, or to Reach Opportunities, and How this Will be Carried I leave to the Care of Mr Payne Who Goes to London. Our Revolution is Getting on as Well as it Can With a...
What Would Have Been My feelings, Had the News of Your illness Reached me Before I knew My Beloved General, My Adoptive father was out of danger! I was Struck with Horror at the idea of the Situation You Have Been in, while I, Uninformed, and to distant from You, Was Anticipating the long waited for pleasure to Hear from You, and the Still More Endearing prospect to Visit You, and present You...
Recevés, monsieur l’hommage de ma vive recconnoissance du brevet que vous aves eu La bonté de nous envoyer pour mr Poirey; et d’accompagner de temoignages si flatteurs d’estime et de bienveillance pour Lui, qu’ils ont mis Le comble a une satisfaction, dont j’ose dire qu’il est digne. vous nous avés fourni un moyen, que nous ne pouvions devoir qu’a vous, de lui montrer le pois que nous mettions...
Give me leave to introduce and recommend to You Mr Kellerman the Son of an Able and patriot General officer in the french Service—it is Not Under the Embroidered Regimentals that we find the Greater Proportion of friends to the Revolution—for which Reason I am the Better disposed to oblige such as Have Sided with us. The National Assembly Have, whilst I was Engaged in quelling a Riotous fight...
Whatever Expectations I Had Conceived of a Speedy termination to our Revolutionary trouble, I Still am tossed about in the Ocean of factions and Commotions of Every Kind—for it is My fate to Be on Each Side, With Equal Animosity Attacked, Both By The Aristocratic, Slavish, Parliamentary, Clerical, in a Word By all Ennemies to my free and levelling doctrine, and on the other Side By the...
I Most Heartly thank You for Your letter dated March the 19th, the more welcome to me, as I Had long lamented Your Silence, and was panting for News from You, My dear General, wherein I Could Be informed of every thing Respecting Your public and private Concerns—I Rejoice and Glory in the Happy Situation of American Affairs—I Bless the Restoration of Your Health, and wish I Could Congratulate...
This is a Very different date from that Which Had Announced to You My Return to the Sweets of Private life, a Situation Hitherto Not very familiar to me, But Which I, after fifteen Revolutionary Years, I Had Become Quite fit to Enjoy—I Have Given You an Account of the Quiete, and Rural Mode of Living I Had Adopted, in the Mountains Where I was Born, Having there a Good House, and a Late Mannor...
I have been called from the army to this Capital for a conference between the two other generals, the ministers, and myself, and am about returning to my military post. The coalition between the continental powers respecting our affairs is certain, and will not be broken by the Emperor’s death; but, altho’ warlike preparations are going on, it is very doubtful whether our neighbors will...
( Translation ) Department of the upper Loire at Chavamac near Brioude Sir, 8t Octr 1792. Without doubt you have learnt our misfortunes—You know that your disciple—your friend has not ceased to act in a manner worthy of you, and of liberty—You know that his unalterable attachment to the Constitution which he swore to maintain, drew upon him the hatred of a powerful faction which wished to...
The Gazetts have announced to me that you are a second time chosen President of the U.S. and this good news a little revives my courage, which the silence of your nation put to a new & severe test. For these six months that M. lafayette has been in the chains of the enemy, after the unheard of proscription which he experienced from his country, from which he was obliged to fly to prevent it...
I am the Happier to Be able to inform You, as I am Sure You Shall Be Happy to Hear that on the 19th September My two friends, family, and Myself Left the olmutz Bastille, and that to Morrow Morning We Shall Be on danish Territory out of the Reach of the Coalitionary Powers—in Vain Would I Attempt, My Beloved General, to Express to You the feelings of My filial Heart, when, at the Moment of...
It is a Melancholy thought to Me that While I Could Be So Happy at Mount Vernon, I am Still Almost As much Separated from you as I have Been for five Years in the Coalitionary prisons—But Altho’ I Lament, yet I Cannot Repent the determination we Have Been obliged to take—Much Less on Account of My Health which Has Been Recovering fast Enough, than for the very Bad and Lingering Condition in...
This letter will be presented to You By Mr Forster whose father, The Celebrated professor and Captain Cooke’s fellow traveller Has Requested In Behalf of His Son these Recommandatory Lines—I am sure His Name Was to You a Sufficient Introduction—and in His personal merit there is also a Sufficient inducement to wish for his wellfare—Yet I should be Highly pleased to Hope that My Recommandation...
Your Letter december the 5th Under Cover to George Has But lately Reached our Hands, and while Such delays make me more and more Lament the distance which Separates us from You, I Cannot Be easy about the fate of my part of the Correspondance—I Beg Leave, Amidst So Many UnHappy chances, to Hope that Omissions will not Be Laid on My Account and that Repetitions will Be allowed—Indeed, my dear...
However uncertain I am of the fate of My Letters, I am Happy in the Opportunities to Let you Hear from me, and altho’ the filial and Grateful Sentiments which from my Youth Have Animated My Heart Need Not Being Remembered to you, it is to me, while so unwillingly Separated from you a Great and Necessary Consolation to Express them—in Case you Have Received Some of the accounts of myself and...
I Have Had some time Ago the pleasure to write you a letter the duplicate of which shall Accompany this —The intelligence Has Since Come to Us of your Having Accepted the Command of the Armies—But you will Not be the less pleased to hear of the dispositions to a fair Reconciliation on the part of the French directory which I Hope will be Reciprocated By the American Governement—To what I took...
your kind and Welcome letter of the 25 december is safely arrived and as my friend Bureau de Puzy has not yet sailed, he will, along with some introductory lines, Carry these my affectionate and filial thanks —no, my dear general, it never Entered my Head to attribute your Silence to any neglect of yours, and I would have Suspected European piracies, or things much more incredible, Rather than...