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Documents filtered by: Author="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
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I do not do myself the honor of wr⟨a⟩ïting to you as many times as I would ch⟨u⟩se, because I fear to disturb⟨e⟩ your important occupations—but I indulge Now that pleasure to me on the occasion of the two nominations of Congress—general connay is a so brave, intelligent, and active officer that he schall, I am sure, justify more and more the esteem of the army and Your approbation—for the...
I went down to this place since the day before yesterday in order to be acquainted of all the roads and grounds arround the ennemy—I heard at my arrival that theyr Main body was betwen great and little timber creek since the same evening—Yesterday morning in recconnoitring about I have been told that they were very busy in crossing the delaware—I saw them myself in theyr boats and sent that...
Your excellency ordered me to give my opinion about these three places for winter quarters 1º the chain from about the Sculchill till betheleem—2º this from reading to lancaster—3º building hutts about and quartering in willmington. I must Confess My being prevented of fixing my Sentiments in a decicise manner by my want of knowledge about very interesting points amongs them as 1º  how far we...
the project of calling a large body of militia for such a day, in order to attack the ennemy in philadelphia, seems to me attended with so many difficulties, inconveniences and bad chances, that if it is not looked upon as a necessary and almost desesperate enterprize, tho’ it is a very shining and highly pleasing idea, however I cannot think it is a prudent and reasonable one. the reasons for...
I went Yesterday morning to Head Quarters with an intention of Speaking to Your Excellency But You were too Busy and I shall lay down in this letter what I wished to Say. I don’t Need telling You How I am Sorry for all what Happens Since Some time it is a necessary dependence of my most tender and Respectful friendship for You, which affection is as true and Candid as the other Sentiments of...
I schould have much more reproached myself the liberty I took of wraïting to your excellency, if I had believed it could engage you in the trouble of answering to that letter—but, now, as you have wrote it, I must tell you that I received this favor with the greatest satisfaction and pleasure—every assurance and proof of your affection fills my heart with joy because that sentiment of yours is...
As your excellency’s opinion seems to gree with my ideas for ⟨taking⟩ in our service those Non commissioned officers who came with Mister du Coudray, I schall take the liberty of telling you what I know about the matter—how useful they would be in this army is a thing obvious for every body—those ⟨men⟩ join to a pretty great theory the greatest practice of theyr art—security and exactitude...
I Schall make use in this particular instance of the liberty you gave me of telling freely every idea of mine which could strike me as not being useless to a better order of things. There were two gentlemen, same rank, same duty to perform, and same neglect of it who have been arrested the same day by me—as I went in the night around the piquets I found them in fault, and I gave an account of...
I have recieved just now a letter from general connway who is gone on to york town, and mullens his aid de camp who is not a wit, lets me know that his going there is in consequence of two repeated letters from general gates, and miflin—that same man thinks that there are some projects to send Connway to Canada—they will laugh in france when they’l hear that he is choosen upon such a...
I can not let go back my guide without taking this opportunity of wraiting to your excellency tho’ I have not yet public business to speak of—I go on very slowly some times pierced by rain, sometimes covered with snow, and not thinking many handsome thoughts about the projected incursion into canada —if succèss were to be had it would surprise me in a more agreable manner, by that very reason...