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Documents filtered by: Author="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Period="Revolutionary War" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
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Your letter of the 10th of May is the last one that Came into My Hands for which I Beg leave to offer You My Best thanks—and in Case former Answers do not Arrive, I Must Again tell you How Happy You Made Your friend By Your letters inclosing the proceedings of the Army—In Every instance, My dear General, I Have the Satisfaction to Love and to Admire you—the Conduct You Had on that Occasion was...
Give me leave to Present to You Mr de Beaune a french officer Whom Respectable Persons Have So much Recommended that I Could not deny Him this letter of introduction—He is Well Spoken of, and Wishes to Improve Himself so as to Become Proper for a Consulship in America. We are Anxiously Waiting for letters from the Continent, and independant of Public Concerns, letters from My dear General...
Having Received No Answer to My Letter By the frigate I May I think flatter Myself Before long to Hear from You, and I Confess I am waiting with Great Impatience—it is an Age, My dear General, since I Had a line from You, and I Have Been so Happily Used to our Intimate Communications, that it is very Hard to me not to know Any thing of Your Ideas, Your Concerns, and Your Sentiments on Every...
As there is no knowing When this Letter May Reach You, I Shall Content Myself With the Introduction of mr de Venkersky a Polander Whom I often Have Met in Several Societies—He is a Sensible Man, of Good family, and, I think, Some What deranged in His Money Concerns—This is all I know of Him, But Upon His Earnest Application, Could not deny Him the Happiness to Be presented to General...
Having Been told by Mquis de Castries at Whose Country Seat I am, that He Now is Sending a Vessel to America, I Cannot Resist an Opportunity to write You a few lines. My Letter’s journey By land Will Be Almost as long As its Voyage Across the Ocean, and the New England Porstmouth is Very far Distant to the Banks of the Potowmack—for I Suppose, My dear General, that You Intend Spending this...
On the 5 Ulto I Had the Honor to write You a Letter, and as Count d’Estaing was pleased to let me Have a Vessel to Carry it, I am not without My Hopes to Have Given You the tidings of a General peace—I also Have informed You that Upon My Going to Sail for America, I Had Received a letter from Mr Carmichael Entreating My Immediate Assistance at Madrid—I therefore Gave up My darling Plan, and...
Were You But Such a Man as julius Cæsar or the king of Prussia, I should Almost Be sorry for You at the End of the Great tragedy Where You are Acting Such a Part—But With My dear General I Rejoice at the Blessings of a Peace Where our Noble Ends Have Been Secured—Remember our Valley forge times, and from a Recollection of Past dangers and labours, We still will Be More pleased at our Present...
My former Letters Have Acquainted You that, However talkative were Politicians About Peace, an Expedition Was Going to take place the Command of Which is Given to Count d’Estaing—I Have Also Added that Upon Being Requested to Go, I Have Willingly Accepted of it, as I thought it the Means, the only Means in the World to Bring About What You Have directed me to obtain Clel Gouvion Must Be With...
My Last Letter Has Informed You that in Case Peace is Not Made, and our Plans do not Immediately take place at this Court, I Would think it Consistent With My zeal for our Cause, and My Obedience to Your Intentions, to take a Round About Way to Serve our Military Purposes. Under those Circumstances, I Have Accepted to Go this Winter With Count d’Estaing. But tho’ I am to Reenter Into the...
Since the time of Cle Gimat’s Arrival not a Line from You Has Come to My Hands, Which Misfortune I Have Much Lamented, and I do assure You, My dear General, that when I Have not the Happiness to Be With You, it is Necessary for me to Receive Some of Your Letters. This Will be delivered By Gnl du Portail and Cel Gouvion Who are Returning to America—I Wish I Could do the Same, But You Must By...
The bearer of my letter, Chevalier de Lambert, a French gentlemen, will do himself the honor to wait upon you, and I beg leave most earnestly to recommend him to your Excellency’s kind patronage.—You know, my dear General, I have ever been averse to the introduction of foreigners in our army, and since I am in France I have been deaf to every application of that sort. In the present instance,...
Mr Grenville says, My dear General, that the Enabling Bill has past both Houses—How it will be worded, I do not know—We also expect some answer to a few lines Count de Vergennes Has Given to Mr Grenville—But I am affraid those people are not sincere. I Had no letter from you this Age, my dear General, and as I Hope you Have wrote some times I guess Many of My letters Have shared the same...
How it is Possible for me to Be Here at this Period You Will Hardly Be able to Conceive, and I Confess I am Myself more and More Surprised at these Strange Delays. Both duty and Inclination Lead me to America, and tho’ it is Not probable You are Active in the field, Yet the Possibility of it is to me A torment. But from the Moment I Engaged in our Noble Cause, I Made it My Sole point to...
However Sensible I am that our Cause May Be Better Served By My Presence Here, than it Could Possibly Be at this Period By My Returning to America, I Cannot Refrain from A Painfull Sentiment at the Sight of Many french officers Who Are Going to Join their Colours in America—I Shall, thank God, follow them Before Any thing Passes that May Have Any Danger or Any Importance—But I am So far from...
We have Certain Intelligence, My dear General, that Lord North is out of place. He Has Himself Announced that event in Parliament, and Said a New Minister Whould Be Named in the Course of two or three days. It is Generally Believed Marquis de Rockingam will Replace Him—Charles Fox is likely to get into Administration, and there will not be Better principles to be found in the New Ministry than...
The sailing of the Alliance Has Been So Unexpected that Mr Franklin and Myself Have not Been Able to Send the dispatches we intended to forward By that Opportunity. There is now a French cutter that is pretty Suddenly Sent of to America—I expected to write By a frigat Which is to Sail in a Short time, But Cannot let this Opportunity slip a way, Before I have the pleasure to Remember me to you,...
Having Landed Some days Ago at L’orient, I Had the Pleasure to inform you of My Safe Arrivall, and Hope the Letter will Have a prosperous passage—You Easely imagine, My dear General, that no time was Lost in posting off to Paris, where I found My family and friends in perfect Health—My daughter and Your George are Grown up so Much that I find Myself great deal older than I Aprehended—the Short...
I Thank My Stars there is a good Opportunity to let You know that After an Happy Voyage of 23 days I am Safely Arrived in L’orient, and that, My Family and friends are In a Very Good Health, Which Circumstance, My Dear General, I am sure will Afford You some Satisfaction. We Are Arrived Last Night, and are Setting out this Morning in Great Speed For Versailles and Paris, so that I Have But the...
I am Sorry to think We are not yet Gone, and there Still Remain Some doubts of our Going to Morrow—This delay I Lament not So Much on private Accounts as I do it on the Account of our Next Campaign in the planning of Which Your Opinion as I will deliver it Must Be of Great Use to the Common Cause—As to the departement of foreign affairs I will Be Happy to justify the Confidence of Congress By...
We are Going to Sail, My dear friend, and the last Account I Hear from the shore, the first one I Am to Give in Europe is a New success of General Grene—fort Anne and 300 men taken, the Ennemy litteraly Reduced to Charlestown and Savahna Will Make a pretty Paragraph in the French Gazette—I Will Make it My Business to Work about the Thing You Must Naturally Wish—God Grant I May Have Soon the...
Inclosed You will find some Numbers a Copy of Which I Have kept and Which Contain some Names that May probably Occur in our Correspondance. I Need Not telling you, My dear General, that I will Be Happy in Giving You Every Intelligence in My power, and Reminding You of the Most Affectionate friend You Can Ever Have. The Goodness You Had to take upon Yourself the Communicating to the Virginia...
Your Excellency having personally seen our dispositions, I shall only give an account of what passed in the execution. Colonel Gimat’s batallion led the van, and was followed by that of Colonel Hamilton’s, who commanded the whole advanced corps, at the same time a party of eighty men, under Col. Laurens, turned the redoubt. I beg leave to refer your Excellency to the report I have received...
You Have So often Been pleased to Ask I Would Give My opinion upon Any subject that May occur, that I will this day take the Liberty to Mention a few Articles. I am far from Laughing at the idea of the Ennemy’s Making a Retreat—it is not very probable—But it is not impossible. Indeed they Have no other way to escape—and Since We Cannot get ships above York I would be still more Afraid of a...
The letter that accompagnies this being relative to matters of public utility, I shall write also this confidential one where none but my private interests are concerned. Owing to your partiality and friendship for me, I have during the Campaign acted the Most Agreable part—I commanded the Army in Virginia, I was opposed to Lord Cornwallis, and the troops you entrusted to me had the greatest...
Gouvion is just Arrived—He says you may be on your way—We hasten to send to the Commanding Naval officer in the Bay—Hitherto I had no way to write to you by water—But Count de Grasse Being at sea we request the officer he has left to have every precaution taken for the safety of navigation—It is probable they are taken, but I would be too uneasy had I not added this measure to those that have...
I had the honor to write you lately giving an account of every thing that came within my knowledge, I was evry hour expecting I might be more particular but if you new how slow things go on in this Country, that still I have done the best in my power, I have written and received twenty letters a day from Government and every department whatever. the Governor does what He can the Wheels of His...
Your letter of the 2d 7ber is just come to Hand. Mine of Yesterday Mentionned that the ships in York River Had gone down. Inclosed is the Account I Receive of an engagement off the Capes. What disposition has been made for the internal protection of the Bay I do not know. Iames River is still guarded but We Have not as Yet Rreceived any letter from Count De Grass relative to His last...
From the Bottom of My Heart I Congratulate you upon the Arrival of the French Fleet—Some Rumors Had Been spread, and spy accounts sent out—But no Certainty untill the Admiral’s dispatches Came to Hand—Inclosed I send you His letter and that of Mis. de St Simon Both of whom I Request you will Have translated By Tilmangh or Gouvion alone as there are parts of them personal which I do not choose...
I am Happy to inform Your Excellency that Count de Grasse’s Fleet is lastly arrived in this Bay—it Consists of 28 ships of the Line with Several frigats, and convoys a Considerable Body of troops Under Marquis de st Simon—Previous to their Arrival Such positions Had Been taken By our Army as to prevent the Ennemy’s Retreating towards Carolina. In Consequence of Your Excellency’s orders I Had...
Independant of the Answer to Your letter of the 15th, I Have Been Very Particular in a Second letter Instrusted to Clel Moriss. But at this Moment Wish to Send you Minuted and Repeated Accounts of Every thing that Passes in this Quarter. The Ennemy Have Evacuated their forts at Ivy, Kemp’s Landing, Great Bridge and Portsmouth. Their Vessels with troops and Baggage went Round to York. Some...
This letter will be Handed By cll Morris who waits upon Your Excellency with Gal Greene’s Sentiments upon the different ways to Improve Count de Grasses assistance. I Have Been desired to Add my Accounts But the last letter I Had the Honor to write Has Anticipated the Informations Which Gral Greene wanted me to give. The Light Infantry are 850—the Pennsylvania 600—Virginia exchanged soldiers...
Your favor of the 15th Has safely come to Hand—I am going to give you an Account of matters in this Quarter. The greatest part of the Ennemy are at York which they do not as yet fortify But are Very Busy upon Gloster Neck where they have a pretty large corps Under Clel Dundass—they Have at York a 44 guns ship—frigats and Vessels are scattered lower down—There is still a small garrison at...
Your Excellency’s Public and Private letters of the 30h july Have Safely Come to Hand for which I Return you My warmest thanks. Be Sure, My dear General, that the Pleasure of Being with You will Make me Happy in Any Command You will think proper to Give—But for the present Am with You of opinion I Had Better Remain in Virginia—the More So as Lord Cornwallis does not chuse to live us, and...
The Embarkation Which I thought and I do Still think to Have Been destined to Newyork Was Reported to Have Sailed up the Bay, and to Be Bound to Baltimore—in Consequence of which I write to Your Excellency, and as I Had not Indulged Myself too Near portsmouth I was able to Cut Across towards Frederiksburg—But instead of Continuing His Voyage up the Bay My Lord Entered York River and Landed at...
I have the honor to inclose your Excellency the report which has been made me this morning from Commodore Barron, of the fleets having sailed, and of its destination being Baltimore. With the greatest respect I have the honor to be Sir Your Excellency’s most ob. ser. I beg leave to mention Majr Macpherson to your Excellency for his very distinguished zeal and services in this quarter. DLC :...
A Correspondant of Mine Servant to Lord Cornwallis writes on the 26th july at Portsmouth, and Says His Master, Tarleton, and Simcoe are Still in town But Expect to Move—the Greatest Part of the Army is Embarked—There is in Hampton Road one 50 guns ship, and two Six and thirty Guns frigats &c. 18 Sloops loaded with Horses—There Remain But Nine vessels in Portsmouth who Appear to Be getting...
Your letter of the 13th is just Come to Hand. The Moment a perfect Intelligence Can Be Got, Major Mcpherson will be Dispatched— But Some Expressions in Your last favor will, if possible, Augment My Vigilance in keeping You well Apprised of the Ennemy’s Movements. There are in Hampton Road Thirty Transport Ships full of troops—Most of them Red Coats— There are eight or ten Brigs which Have...
I Had Some days ago the Honor to write to Your Excellency and informed you that a detachement from the British Army would probably embark at Portsmouth. The two Bataïllons of Light Infantry and the Queen’s Rangers were certainly, and the Guards with one or two British Regiments, were likely to Be, ordered upon that service. My Conjectures Have proved true and 49 sails fallen down in Hampton...
This letter is not By Any Means directed to the Commander in chief, But to My Most Intimate and Confidential friend—I will lay Before you My Circumstances and My wishes—Certain I am You will do whatever You Can for me that is Consistent with Your public duty. When I went to the Southward You know I Had Some private objections—But I Became Sensible of the Necessity there was for the detachement...
No Accounts from the North ward, No Letter from Head Quarters—I am utterly a Stranger to Every thing that passes out of Virginia—and Virginian Operations Being for the Present in a State of languor, I Have More time to think of My Solitude. in a Word, My dear General, I am Home Sick and if I Can’t go to Head Quarters wish at least to Hear from there. I am Anxious to know Your opinion...
The inclosed Copy, my dear general, will give you an account of our affairs in this Quarter—Agreably to your orders, I Have Avoided a general Action, and when Lord Cornwallis’s movements indicated it was Against His interest to fight, I Have ventured partial engagements—His Lordship Seems to have given up the Conquest of Virginia. it has been a great secret that our Army was not Superior and...
Inclosed I Have the Honor to send you Copy of my letter to general greene. The ennemy Have Been so kind as to Retire Before us. twice I gave them a chance of fighting (taking Care not to Engage farther than I pleased) But they Continued their Retrogade motions—our Numbers are I think Exagerated to them, and our seeming Boldness confirms the opinion. I thought at first Lord Cornwallis wanted to...
Independant of public Motives private Attachement for You Renders it very Hard to me that our Correspondance is so much Interrupted. I heartly feel for the Accident that Has put Some of your letters in the Hands of the Ennemy—the more So as the friendship that You are pleased to Honor me with Had Induced you to Confidential Communications—Letters from the late governor of this State to me Have...
the disapointement Clel Tupper Met with is So Singular that I wish to Give Your Excellency a full account of this Affair. When the detachement was at the Head of Elk Clel Vose expressed a desire to Return to the Northward founded Upon the particular Circumstances He was Under Which Nothing But fear of Giving Exemple to His Officers and Men prevented Him officialy to Signify— from what He often...
Inclosed you will find the Copy of a letter to General Greene. He at first Had-Requested I would directly write to you, Since which His orders Have Been different, But He directed me to forward you Copies of My official Accounts. So many letters are lost in their Way that I do not Care to Avoid Repetitions. I Heartly wish, My dear General, My Conduct may Be approved of particularly By You. My...
I request you will receive My Affectionate Aknowledgement for your kind letters. Every mark of friendship I receive from you Adds to my Happiness as I love you with all the sincerity and Warmth of My Heart, and the sentiment I feel for you goes to the very extent of my affections. Inclosed I send you, my dear General, two Copies of letters to General Greene which I also have sent to Congress...
the jonction of Lord Cornwallis with the other Army at peters Burg was an Event that from local Circumstances and from thier so Great Superiority it was Impossible to prevent— it took place on the 20th and Having lost Every Hope to Operate a timely stroke in Conjunction with the pennsylvanians, My ideas were Confined to defensive Measures—I therefore Moved up to Richmond where precautions were...
My official letter a Copy of which I Send to Congress will let you know the Situation of Affairs in this Quarter—I ardently wish My Conduct May Meet with Your Approbation—Had I followed the first Impulsion of My temper, I would Have Risked Some thing More—But I Have Been Guarding Against My Own Warmth, and this Consideration that a General defeat which with Such a proportion of Militia Must Be...
Having been directed by Genl Greene to take Command of the Troops in Virginia, I have also received Orders from him, that every Account from this Quarter be immediately transmitted to Congress and to your Excellency; in obedience to which I shall have the honour to relate our Movements, and those of the combined Armies of the Enemy. When Genl Phillips retreated from Richmond, his project was...
My Correspondance with one of the British Generals, and my denial of a Correspondance with the other, may be perhaps misrepresented—I shall therefore give an Account of what has passed, and hope your Excellency & Genl Greene will approve of my Conduct. On the arrival of our Detatchment at Richmond, three letters were brought by a Flag which I have the honour to inclose; & which as Commander of...