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I thank you for forwarding Mr Campbells letter; & whenever I shall have the pleasure of seeing you (for I would not put you to the trouble of calling for that purpose only) I will converse with you upon the subject of it. I confess, in the meantime, that I do not see upon what ground the application is made, to me. I can hardly suppose, Congress will disband the Troops now in Service, and...
At as early an hour this evening as you can make it convenient, I should be glad to see you. yrs sincerely & affecly Sparks transcript , MH . The only year of GW’s presidency in which 13 Dec. fell on a Tuesday was 1791.
I thank you for the perusal of the enclosed reports—Mr Jay seems to have laboured the point respecting the Convention. If any thing should occur that is interesting, & your leizure will permit it, I should be glad to hear from you on the subject. Printed copy (Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 686, 1892). Letter and enclosures not found. Listed in DLC : Madison Miscellany. JM appears either to...
I thank you for your letter of the 30th Ult. It came by the last Post. I am better pleased that the proceedings of the Convention is handed from Congress by a unanimous vote (feeble as it is) than if it had appeared under stronger marks of approbation without it. This apparent unanimity will have its effect. Not every one has opportunities to peep behind the curtain; and as the multitude often...
Enclosed I return you the list of Sales in the Federal City. You will oblige me, by drafting a short answer to the Address, to be presented tomorrow, and sending it to me this Evening or in the Morning early. If you want the Address let me know it & it shall be sent to you. Yours—Sincerely & Affectly. RC (Hawaii State Archives: Cartwright Collection); Tr ( MH : Sparks Transcripts). RC...
Notwithstanding the conviction I am under of the labour which is imposed upon you by Public Individuals as well as public bodies—Yet, as you have began, so I would wish you to finish, the good work in a short reply to the Address of the House of Representatives (which I now enclose) that there may be an accordance in this business. Thursday 12 O’clock, I have appointed to receive the Address....
If Mr Madison could make it convenient to spare half an hour from other matters, G. W. would be glad to see him at 11 oclock to day. AL (photocopy), NjP : Armstrong Photostats; AL , sold by Christie, Manson & Woods, International, Inc, 1993. No evidence has been found confirming the subject of this meeting.
At the same time that I acknowledge the receipt of your obliging favor of the 21st. Ult. from New York, I promise to avail myself of your indulgence of writing only when it is convenient to me. If this should not occasion a relaxation on your part, I shall become very much your debtor—and possibly like others in similar circumstances (when the debt is burthensome) may feel a disposition to...
The enclosed were communicated to me, as you will perceive, to make a confidential use of—upon receipt of the first letter, I expressed a desire to be informed (if there was nothing improper in it) through what channel the report came, and what reliance could be placed in the authenticity of it—This gave rise to the second letter —As you are upon business which requires every information of...
Ca. 14 February 1795, Philadelphia. Solicits subscriptions for Giuseppe Ceracchi’s proposed monument to the American Revolution. Encloses a description. Printed copy ( Historical Magazine , 3 [1859]: 234–36). Addressed to JM, with the note, “From a copy in the hands of Peter Force, Esq.” Dated 14 June 1795, probably in error; date here assigned on the basis of the copy printed in Syrett and...
Enclosed are the last dispatches I have rec’d from Mr Gouvr Morris. As they unfold, pretty evidently I think, the disposition of the British Ministry, I wish you to see them—Pray return them to me in the course of this day. Sincerely & Affectly, I am Yrs ALS , anonymous donor. The enclosures almost certainly included Gouverneur Morris’s letters of 18 and 21 Sept. 1790 reporting the failure of...
Letter not found. Ca. 30 January 1789 . Mentioned in Washington to JM, 2 Jan. and 16 Feb. 1789 . Requests JM’s advice concerning a proposed speech drafted by David Humphreys (see Washington to JM, 16 Feb. 1789, n. 1 ).
The enclosed letters, with the additional explanation that follows, will bring the case of young Fayette fully to your view. From the receipt of Mr Cabots letter until the latter end of Octr, I had not heard from, or of the young Gentleman. Then, a letter from Colo. Hamilton, to whom as you will see by Mr Cabots letter he had been introduced, informed me that he and his Tutor were in a retired...
Mr Madison having been so obliging as to draw the answer to the address of the House of Representatives—G.W. would thank him for doing the same to that of the Senate. If he receives it any time this day or tomorrow morning it will be sufficient. AL , DLC : Madison Papers. The date of this document is conjectural. Madison docketed the letter—apparently some years after the fact—“G. Washington...
I have been favored with your Letter of the 19th by which it appears that a quoram of Congress was hardly to be expected until the beginning of the past week. As this delay must be very irksome to the attending members, and every days continuance of it (before the Government is in operation) will be more sensibly felt, I am resolved, no interruption shall proceed from me that can well be...
Letter not found: to James Madison, 10 Oct. 1791. Sold by Stan V. Henkels, 1892, catalog 694, item 63.
I accept very kindly the Address of the President & Professors of the University of William & Mary. The Reduction of the British Force in this State for which I feel myself highly indebted to the Noble Exertions of our Brave and Generous Allies, is a Circumstance which gives me great pleasure, not only as it affords a Return of peaceful Security to many of my fellow Citizens, but as it will, I...
§ From George Washington. Ca. 1789–1796. Three notes requesting consultation with JM on unspecified matters: “Thursday, 9 oclk. “If you could make it convenient to call here before you go to the House, you would oblige me. I want to have some conversation with you on two or three matters. Yrs Affectly.” “Sunday ½ past 7 oclk. “If you have leisure to give the enclosed a reading, and me an...
I thank you for the perusal of the enclosed reports—Mr Jay seems to have laboured the point respecting the Convention. If any thing should occur that is interesting, & your leizure will permit it, I should be glad to hear from you on the subject; Printed in Henkels catalog no. 694, item 30, 6–7 Dec. 1892; copy, MH : Jared Sparks Collection. The editors of the Madison Papers (8:380–81)...
My solicitude for drawing the first characters of the Union into the Judiciary, is such that, my cogitations on this subject last night (after I parted with you) have almost determined me (as well for the reason just mentioned, as to silence the clamours, or more properly, soften the disappointment of smaller characters [)] to nominate Mr Blair and Colo. Pendleton as Associate & District...
The enclosed were communicated to me (as you will perceive) to make a Confidential use of. Upon receipt of the first letter I expressed a desire to be informed (if there was nothing improper in it) through what channel the report came, and what reliance could be placed in the authenticity of it. This produced the sec’d letter. As you are upon business which requires every information of the...
I am indebted to you for several of your favors, and thank you for their enclosures. The rumours of War between France and England have subsided; and the poor Patriots of Holland, it seems, are left to fight their own Battles or negotiate—in neither case with any great prospect of Advantage. They must have been deceived, or their conduct has been divided, precip[it]ant, & weak. The former,...
It has so happened, that the letter which you did me the favor of writing to me on the 5th, did not get to my hands until the 15th. instant, owing, in part, to the uncertainty of the Mail (on account of the change from the Summer to the Winter establishment of the Stages) and partly to some engagements which prevented my sending to the Post Office agreeably to my usual custom. I wish it was in...
The decision of Massachusetts, notwithstanding its concomitants, is a severe stroke to the opponents of the proposed Constitution in this State; and with the favorable determinations of the States which have gone before, and such as are likely to follow after, will have a powerful operation on the minds of Men who are not actuated more by disappointment, passion and resentment, than they are...
Your favor of the 18th. Ulto. came duly to hand. As no subject is more interesting, and seems so much to engross the attention of every one as the proposed Constitution, I shall, (tho’ it is probable your communications from Richmond are regular and full with respect to this, and other matters, which employ the consideration of the Assembly) give you the extract of a letter from Doctr Stuart,...
As the Communications herewith enclosed will not take much time to Read; As there are matters related which to me are new; and as the information respecting land transactions, and other things in the Western Country will require to be noticed & acted upon in some way or another, I send them to you together with a Gazette with a marked paragraph containing some suggestions that have not, I...
I have been favored with your letter of the 11th. The proceedings of the Conference, and the Act & Resolutions of this Legislature consequent thereupon (herewith transmitted to the Assembly) are so full, & explanatory of the motives which governed in this business, that it is scarcely necessary for me to say any thing in addition to them; except that this State seem highly impressed with the...
As the Communications herewith enclosed will not take much time to read; As there are matters related which to me are new; and as the information respecting land transactions, and other things in the Western Country will require to be noticed & acted upon in some way or another, I send them to you together with a Gazette with a marked paragraph containing some suggestions that have not, I...
If Mr. Madison could make it convenient to spare half an hour from other matters, GW would be glad to see him at 11 Oclock to day. RC (photostat, DLC : Washington Papers); Tr ( MH : Sparks Transcripts). RC addressed by Washington. The RC was offered for sale by Parke-Bernet Galleries in 1954. JM noted in his “Substance of a Conversation with the President” (see memorandum of 5 May 1792 ) that...
Receive my thanks for your obliging communications of the 11th. I hear with much pleasure that the assembly are engaged, seriously, in the consideration of the Revised Laws. A short & simple code, in my opinion, tho’ I have the sentiments of some of the Gentlemen of the long Robe against me, would be productive of happy consequences, and redound to the honor of this or any Country which shall...
Major McHenry—formerly an assistant Secretary to me, & afterwards Aid de Camp to the Marqs de la Fayette, informs me that Congress are about to appoint Official Secretaries for their Ministers abroad, & expresses a wish to go in that character to the Court of Versailles—or London. Justice, if I could divest myself of the inclination to serve this Gentleman, would compel me to represent him as...
If the weather will permit, & Mr Madison’s health suffer him to go out to day, the Presdt would be glad if he would give him a call before he goes to the House. Transcript, MH : Jared Sparks Collection. Madison was ill with influenza during the last week or so of April but was well enough to consult with GW on 27 April about the Foreign Intercourse Act ( Diaries Donald Jackson and Dorothy...
Receive my thanks for your obliging communications of the 11th—I hear with much pleasure that the assembly are engaged, seriously, in the consideration of the revised Laws. A short & simple code, in my opinion, tho’ I have the sentiments of some of the Gentlemen of the long robe against me, would be productive of happy consequences, and redound to the honor of this or any Country which shall...
I thank you for your letter of the 30th. Ult. It came by the last Post. I am better pleased that the proceedings of the Convention is handed from Congress by a unanimous vote (feeble as it is) than if it had appeared under stronger marks of approbation without it. This apparent unanimity will have its effect. Not every one has opportunities to peep behind the curtain; and as the multitude...
Having heard of your Election by a respectable majority of the suffrages of the District for which you stood and conceiving it probable that you would soon be on your journey to New York—possibly before my return from the Seneca Falls—for which place, by appointment, I am this moment setting off by the way of George Town; where I expect to meet Governors Johnson & Lee. I take the liberty of...
After the several conversations we have had on the subject of inland navigation; and the benefits which would, probably, be derived from a commercial intercourse with the Western territory; I shall make no apology for giving you the trouble of the enclosed. It is matter of regret to me, however, that I cannot accompany them with some explanations & observations. It was intended these papers...
Confidential The points which at present occur to me, and on which I wish your aid, are brought to view in the enclosed statement—I give you the trouble of receiving this evening that you may (if other matter do not interfere) suffer them to run through your Mind between this and tomorrow afternoon when I shall expect to see you at the appointed time. Besides the enclosed Would it do now that...
I return Mr. Jefferson’s letter with thanks for the perusal of it. I am glad he has resolved to accept the Appointment of Secretary of State, but sorry it is so repugnant to his own inclinations that it is done. Sincerely & Affectly. I am—Yrs. RC ( NjP ); Tr ( MH : Sparks Transcripts). RC addressed by Washington; docketed by JM late in life: “G. Washington—no date / 1789–90.” For dating of the...
At the sametime that I acknowledge the receipt of your obliging favor of the 21st Ult. from New York, I promise to avail myself of your indulgence of writing only when it is convenient to me. If this should not occasion a relaxation on your part, I shall become very much your debtor—and possibly like others in similar circumstances (when the debt is burthensome) may feel a disposition to apply...
I want to communicate two matters to Congress; the substance of which is contained in the enclosed Paper. The first requires to be decided upon before the proposed adjournment shall take place—but my motive for commun[ic]ating the other, at this time, is only to fix the attention, & to promote enquiry against the next meeting. Whether would an Oral or written communication be best? If the...
Mr. Madison having been so obliging as to draw the answer to the Address of the House of Representatives—GW. would thank him for doing the same to that of the Senate. If he receives it any time this day or tomorrow morning it will be sufficient. RC ( DLC ); Tr ( MH ). Late in life JM docketed the RC : “G. Washington without date—(perhaps 1789,) 90 or 91.” Fitzpatrick ( Writings of Washington ,...
Your favors of the 21st & 27th of last month came duly to hand. The last, contained the pleasing—and I may add (tho’ I could not reconcile it with any ideas I entertained of common policy) unexpected account of the unconditional ratification of the Consitution by the State of New York—That No. Carolina will hesitate long in its choice I can scarcely believe; but what Rhode Island will do is...
I thank you for forwarding Mr. Campbells letter; & whenever I shall have the pleasure of seeing you (for I would not put you to the trouble of calling for that purpose only) I will converse with you upon the subject of it. I confess, in the meantime, that I do not see upon what ground the application is made, to me . I can hardly suppose, Congress will disband the Troops now in Service, and...
Confidential The points which at present occur to me, and on which I wish your aid, are brought to view in the enclosed statement—I give you the trouble of receiving this evening that you may (if other matter do not interfere) suffer them to run through your Mind between this and tomorrow afternoon when I shall expect to see you at the appointed time. Besides the enclosed Would it do now that...
If the weather will permit, & Mr Madison’s health suffer him to go out to day, the Presdt. would be glad if he would give him a call before he goes to the House. Tr ( MH : Sparks Transcripts).
I have been favored with your letter of the 11th. The proceedings of the conference, and the Act & resolutions of this Legislature consequent thereupon (herewith transmitted to the Assembly) are so full, & explanatory of the motives which governed in this business, that it is scarcely necessary for me to say any thing in addition to them; except that, this State seem highly impressed with the...
Since my last, acknowledging the first letter you did me the favor to write to me after your arrival in Richmond, I have received your subsequent ones of the 13th & 18th instant; which, tho’ less favourable than the former, are more pleasing than suspence. I will yet hope that the good sense of this Country, maugre all the arts of opposition, will ultimately decide right on the important...
Gentlemen: I returned yesterday from Annapolis, having conducted the Marquis La Fayette that far on his way to New York, and left him proceeding on the road to Baltimore, on Wednesday last. This trip afforded me opportunities of conversing with some of the leading characters in the different branches of the Legislature of Maryland, on the subject of inland navigation, and the benefits which...
Consequent of the enclosed resolution, I had a conference with the Commee therein named yesterday, when I expressed the Sentiments which you also have enclosed. I was assured by the Committee, that the only object the Senate had in view was to be informed of the mode of communication which would be most agreeable to the President, and that a perfect acquiescence would be yielded thereto. But I...
The Agricultural Society of Philadelphia, are preparing the “out lines of a Plan for establishing a state Society of Agriculture in Pennsylvania” to be laid before the Legislature. Mr Peters—to whom sometime ago I mentioned the Pamphlets &ca which had been sent me by Sir John Sinclair; & who is appointed to prepare the business for the Legislature—wishes to have the perusal of those...