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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Knox, Henry" AND Period="Confederation Period" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
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The cloth & Buttons which accompanied your favor of the 30th Ult., came safe by Colo. Hanson; and really do credit to the Manufactures of this Country. As it requires Six more of the large (engraved) button to trim the Coat in the manner I wish it to be, I would thank you, my good Sir, for procuring that number and retaining them in your hands until my arrival at New York. Not to contemplate...
The Mail of the 30th brought me your favor of the 23d—For which, & the regular information you have had the goodness to transmit of the state of things in New York, I feel myself very much obliged, and thank you accordingly. I feel for those Members of the new Congress, who, hitherto, have given an unavailing attendance at the theatre of business. For myself, the delay may be compared to a...
Permit me, in one line, to acknowledge the receipt of your polite and obliging favors of the 9th 12th & 16th instt and to thank you for the information they contain. Public affairs seem to be in an awkward interregnum—and among other irksome circumstances, can not be quite congenial with the feelings of the attending members of the New Congress. My best wishes, in which Mrs Washington unites,...
I beg you to accept my acknowledgment of and thanks for your obliging favors of the 12th 16th & 19th of last month, and particularly for the trouble you have had in procuring and forwarding for me a suit of the Hartford Manufacture. It is come safe, and exceeds my expectation. I will take an early opportunity of paying the cost of it. The result of the late Elections will not only soon be...
I have the honor to enclose a letter from Monsr Cottineau de Kerloquin requesting an admission into the Society of the Cincinnati—and one from the Chevalier D’Anmours setting forth the services of that Gentleman and his pretensions to admission. Both of which I must beg you to lay before the Society at their next General Meeting that they may take the necessary steps thereon; unless it shall...
Having learnt from an Advertisement in the New York Daily Advertiser, that there were superfine American Broad Cloths to be sold at No. 44 in Water Street; I have ventured to trouble you with the Commission of purchasing enough to make me a suit of Cloaths. As to the colour, I shall leave it altogether to your taste; only observing, that, if the dye should not appear to be well fixed, & clear,...
I have received by the last Mail your favour dated the 21st of Decr and hasten to return this acknowledgment, together with the enclosed Certificate of Service for Major Haskell. I give that testimony with the greater alacrity, because it always affords me satisfaction, when I can gratify the wishes of a worthy man, in perfect conformity to my own judgment. I am much pleased to find that the...
I received your letter of the 25th of May, just when I was on the eve of departure for Fredericksburgh to pay a visit to my mother from whence I returned only last evening. The information of the accession of South Carolina to the New Government, since your letter, gives us a new subject for mutual felicitations. It was to be hoped this auspicious event would have had considerable influence...
Your favor of the 10th came duly to hand, and by Mr Madison I had the pleasure to hear that you had recovered from a severe indisposition, on which event I sincerely congratulate you. The conduct of the State of New Hampshire has baffled all calculation, and happened extremely mal-apropos for the election of delegates to the Convention of this State; For be the real cause of the adjournment to...
I pray you to accept my acknowledgements of your favors of the 10th and 14th Ulto and congratulation on the acceptance of the new Constitution by the State of Massachusetts—Had this been done without its concomitants, and by a larger Majority the stroke would have been more severaly felt by the antifederalists in other States. As it is, it operates as a damper to their hopes, and is a matter...
Letter not found: to Henry Knox, 11 Feb. 1788. On 10 Mar. Knox wrote GW : “Your favor of the 11th ultimo was duly received.” Knox may have been referring to GW’s letter of 5 February . See Knox to GW, 10 Mar., n.1 .
Soon after my last was dispatched to you, I was favoured with the receipt of your letter of the 14th Ult.; by which, and other accts of more recent date, I am sorry to find that the important question under deliberation in Massachusetts, stands on such precarious ground. The decision of that State will, unquestionably, have considerable influence on those which are to follow; especially on the...
I beg you to accept of my thanks for your obliging favor of the 11th Ult.; which, owing to the dullness of the season, and want of matter to amuse you, has lain unacknowledged till this time. Three States—to wit—Pensylvania New Jersey, and Delaware having adopted the New Constitution in so decisive a manner and those of New Hampshire, Massachusetts & Connecticut having discovered such...
Your favor of the 3d instt came duly to hand. The fourth day after leaving Phila. I arrived at home, and found Mrs Washington and the family tolerably well, but the fruits of the Earth almost entirely destroyed by one of the severest droughts (in this neighbourhood) that ever was experienced. The Crops generally, below the Mountains are injured; but not to the degree that mine, & some of my...
By slow, I wish I could add & sure, movements, the business of the Convention progresses; but to say when it will end, or what will be the result, is more than I can venture to do; and therefore shall hazard no opinion thereon. If however, some good does not proceed from the Session, the defects cannot, with propriety, be charged to the hurry with which the business has been conducted: yet...
It gave me great pleasure to find by your letter of the 29th that you were freed from all apprehension on acct of Miss Lucys eye—and that we might flatter ourselves with the expectation of seeing Mrs Knox & you at this place. It was not untill Friday last that Seven States assembled in Convention. By these I was, much against my wish, unanimously placed in the Chair—Ten States are now...
After every consideration my judgment was able to give the subject, I had determined to yield to the wishes of many of my friends who seemed extremely anxious for my attending the Convention, which is proposed to be holden in Philadelphia the second Monday of May. And tho’ so much afflicted with a rheumatic complaint (of which I have not been entirely free for Six months) as to be under the...
Hurried as I am I cannot (not expecting to see you in Philadelpa) withhold the copy of a Paragraph in a letter which came to my hands yesterday from Mr Jefferson, and a translation of the article “Cincinnati” from the Encyclopedie Methodique; forwarded to me by the same Gentleman as they relate to the Society & serve to shew the light in wch it is viewed in France. I do not know what the...
The early attention which you were so obliging as to pay to my letter of the 8th ulto is highly pleasing and flattering to me. Were you to continue to give me information on the same point, you would add to the favor; as I see, or think I see, reasons for and against my attendance in Convention so near an equilibrium, as will cause me to Determine upon either, with diffidence. One of the...
Will you permit me to give you the trouble of making an indirect, but precise enquiry, into the alligations of the enclosed letters. I flatter myself that from the vicinity of Elizabeth Town to New York, and the constant intercourse between the two, you will be able to do it without much trouble. It is but little in my power to afford the pecuniary aids required by the letter writer; but if...
Accept, my dear General Knox my affectionate thanks for your obliging favors of the 29th, 30th, & 31st of Jany and 1st 8th & 12th of the present month. They were indeed, exceedingly satisfactory, and relieving to my mind which has been filled with great & anxious uneasiness for the issue of General Lincoln’s operations, and the dignity of Government. On the prospect of the happy termination of...
I feel my self exceedingly obliged to you for the full, & friendly communications in your letters of the 14th 21st & 25th ult.; and shall (critically as matters are described in the latter) be extremely anxious to know the issue of the movements of the forces that were assembling, the one to support, the other to oppose the constitutional rights of Massachusetts. The moment is, indeed,...
Letter not found: to Henry Knox, 25 Jan. 1787. On 8 Feb. Knox wrote GW : “I have received your favor of the 25 Jany.”
Nothing but the pleasing hope of seeing you under this roof in the course of last month, and wch I was disposed to extend even to the present moment, has kept me till this time from acknowleging the receipt of your obliging favor of the 23d of October. Despairing now of that pleasure, I shall thank you for the above letter, and the subsequent one of the 17th instt, which came to hand yesterday...
The inclosed letter I received a short time since. As I am wholly unacquainted with the writer, & circumstances therein mentioned; I can only say, that if the facts are such as there alledged, I think the sufferer is entitled to some redress; but how far it may be in the power of Congress to comply with petitions of this nature I am not able to say. You undoubtedly know much better than I do,...
The Post of last week brougt me (by way of New York) a letter, of which the inclosed is a Copy. I transmit it, not only for your perusal, but for information, and advice. All the papers respecting the Soci[e]ty of the Cincinnati being in possession of the Secretary Genl or the Assistant Secretary, and my memory very defective, I cannot speak with precision to Mr Jefferson, or decide on any...
Majr Farlie gave me the pleasure of receiving your letter of the 22d Instt, & thereby knowing that you, Mrs Knox & the family were all well. It has always been my opinion you know, that our Affairs with respect to the Indians would never be in a good train whilst the British Garrisons remained on the American side of the territorial line—& that these Posts would not be evacuated by them, as...
I am quite ashamed to be so long deficient in acknowledging the receipt of your favors of the 24th & 29th of March, and 5th of May; but an intervention of circumstances (with the enumeration of which I shall not trouble you) have prevented it. It gave me great pleasure to hear of your appointment as Secretary at War—without a complimt, I think a better choice could not have been made—and...
Your favor of the 31st Ulto came to my hands by the last Post. enclosed are letters under flying Seals to Count de Rochambeau & the Marqs de Chastellux (late Chevr) introductory of Mr Swan. also certificates for Lieutts Seaver & Henley. if these will answer the purposes designed, I shall think nothing of the trouble, but be happy in having given them. Upon summing up the cost of my projected...
About the beginning of last month I wrote you a pretty long letter, & soon after, received your favor of the 23d of November. It is not the letters from my friends which give me trouble—or adds ought to my perplexity. I receive them with pleasure, and pay as much attention to them as my avocations will admit. It is references of old matters with which I have nothing to do. Applications, which...
Apologies are idle things: I will not trouble you with them—that I am your debtor in the epistolary way I acknowledge—and that appearances indicate a disposition to remain so, I cannot deny; but I have neither the inclination nor the effrontary to follow the example of Great Men or St—s to withhold payment altogether. To whatever other causes therefore my silence may be attributed, ascribe it...
The inconvenience with which I left home, & my impatience to return to it, hastened every step I took back, & but for the delay I met with in crossing the Bay, I might have been at home with ease on the Friday after I parted with you. Before eight on thursday morning I was at Rock-hall, & not until friday evening could I get my horses & carriage over to Annapolis. It is a real misfortune, that...
The names which follow, are those mentioned in the Marqs la Fayette’s letter to me. La’ Peyrouse La Touche D’Albert de Rion✻ Tilly✻ Enclosed it seems is the proper address to the characters therein mentioned, I send it that you may be governed thereby—pray return it to me again —The enclosed private letters be so good as to include under cover of the public ones. Yrs affly ✻I am not sure that...
Your Letter of the 21st ulto did not reach my hands ’till yesterday—Having the Governor here & a house full of company—& the Post being on the point of setting out for the Eastward I must confine the few lines I shall be able (at this time) to write, to the business of the Cincinnati. From what you have said of the temper of your Assembly respecting this Society—from the current of Sentiment...
The bad weather, and great care which the Post Riders take of themselves, prevented your letters of the 3d & 9th of last Month from getting to my hands ’till the 10th of this. Setting of next Morning for Fredericksburgh to pay my duty to an aged Mother, and not returning ’till yesterday, will be admitted I hope, as a sufficient apology for my silence ’till now. I am much obliged by the trouble...
The splendid display of fire works last Evening were so highly satisfactory that I must request you to present to Cap. Price under whose direction they were prepared and to the Officers who assisted them, my thanks for the great skill and attention shewn in the conduct of that business. I am Sir DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Finding it essential to public Interest that you should superintend the Posts & Military affairs in this Department; untill some farther Arrangement or untill the pleasure of Congress shall be known; I therefore to request that you remain in Service untill the foregoing events shall place—in the mean time will be pleased to pay part attention to the enclosed In respectg a reformation of the...
The splendid display of Fire works last Evening was so highly satisfactory that I must Request you to present to Captain Price under whose direction they were prepared, and to the Officers who assisted him, my thanks for the great skill and attention shewn in the conduct of that business. I am Sir Your most Obedient Servant. MHi : Henry Knox Papers.
I do myself the honor to transmit you the proceedings of the society of the Cincinnati of the State of So. Carolina which I reced yesterday. I am sir Your most Obed. Servt DSoC .
You will readily conceive how much I have been chagreened, & vexed at a loss occasioned by the stupidity of the Postmaster at Princeton, when I tell you, that the original of which the enclosed is a duplicate, & the first draughts of all my public & private letters written in the Six Weeks preceeding; were lost with the Mail on Thursday Night last. Having many letters to write by the Post the...
I had the pleasure to reply to your Letter of the 15th of October to go by the Post before the last, but by some neglect my letter was left out of the Mail and remained in the Post office untill the Evening before the last Post should have gone, when it was, with all the Easter Mail, stolen from thence—unfortunately too, all the Copies of my letters up to that day met with the same accident,...
This will be delivered you by Mr Arthur Noble a Gentleman from Ireland who visits this Country in behalf of a considerable number of his Countrymen to provide a settlement for them. He is Recommended to me by the President of Congress & by Mr Morris and as he is going to the Northward and wishes to take west point in his way—I take the liberty to Request your attention and liberties to him...
Since the return of Genl Lincoln, I have taken occasion to move a little on the Subject of your letter of the 17th of last March—notwithstanding other matters have kept the Peace Establisment entirely out of view. I suppose, at least I so hope, that it will now be taken up with a determination to go thro’ with it—without more delays. Upon enquiry, I do not perceive any intention to abolish the...
The arrival of the Definitive Treaty, and the evacuation of New York have been so long delayed as to interfere very materially with our arrangements for the Celebration of Peace; at this Season no use can be made of the Bower, the only possible means of accomodation, besides, the dissolution of the Army at so short a period totally defeats the object in view, for if we were even determined not...
Since I had the pleasure to write to you on the 8th Instant, I have received your Letter of that date. I am clearly of opinion that the services of those Men whose times expire so early in the spring, are not adequate to their Clothing and Maintenance during the Winter, but, as I said in my last letter, such seems the disposition of the members of Congress with whom I have conversed on the...
Major Shaw not returning so soon as I immagined, and the subject of your Letter of the 28 September not admitting much delay I take the opportunity of the Post to reply to it. On referring to the Institution of the Society of the Cincinnati I find that the Chevr de la Luzerne, the Sieur Gerard, the Counts D’Estaign, de Barras & De Grasse, the Chevalier des Touches, and the Count de Rochambeau,...
Captain Shaw has handed me your Letter of the 2d instant. I have been impatiently waiting the determination of Congress to ascertain what number of Troops are actually to be kept up in the Garrison of West-point during the Winter but I do not see any probability of their coming to a speedy decision; on the contrary, the Members with whom I have conversed seem unwilling to lessen the present...
Count Wengiersky, a Polish Gentleman travelling the Continent for his amusement, will have the pleasure to deliver you this; he comes recommended to me by the Marquis de la Fayette and by the Minister of France and as he proposes to take West-point in his tour I take the liberty to Request your civilities to him during his stay there. Mr Vernon, an English Gentleman lately from Europe travels...
Supposing the necessary number of Troops to be kept up during the Winter it will be necessary to make some provision to supply their wants of Cloathing. That this may not be delayed I am to request you to call for Returns of such Articles as will be absolutely necessary and to forward me a general Return thereof as soon as possible. I am Dear sir Your very Obed. servant MHi : Henry Knox Papers.
I am happy in transmitting to you the inclosed Resolves of Congress,which I must desire you to publish to the Army and to assure General Howe and the Detachment who were under his Command, of the pleasure it gives me to communicate to them this public testimony of the approbation of Congress. I am Dear sir Your most Obedt Servt MHi : Henry Knox Papers.