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Your kind and friendly letter of the 17th Ulto has been duly received, and I beg you to accept my sincere thanks for the affectionate sentiments you have been pleas’d to express for me, therein. I can assure you, Sir, I never ascribed a motive to the letter you wrote me, on my Election to the Chair of Government, so unworthy of you as to suppose it was written with a view of: “Pressing...
The numerous congratulations which I have received from Public Bodies & respectable individuals since my appointment to my present station, are truly grateful, as they hold forth the strongest assurances of support to the Government as well as a warm attachment to myself. It is from the good dispositions of the people at large—from the influence of respectable characters—and from the patriotic...
Previous to your departure from the Army, I wish to take an oppertunity of expressing my sentiments of your Services—my obligations for your assistance—& my wishes for your future felicity. Our object is at last attained—the arrangements are almost compleated—and the day of seperation is now at hand—Permit me therefore to thank you for the trouble you have lately taken in the arrangement of...
To the General Officers of the Army Assembled at Head Quarters, Newburgh, 24th June 1783. Gentlemen I am to request your opinions of the three following Questions. viz. 1st—Whether all the measures which were proper for giving satisfaction to Brigadr General Hazen and a number of the Officers of his Corps, respecting Major Reid, have been persued, or not? 2dly—In case they have not, what...
Before I make a reply to the Subject of the Address of the Generals and Officers Commanding the Regiments and Corps of this Army presented by yourself yesterday I intreat that those Gentlemen will accept my warmest acknowledgements for the confidence they have been pleased to repose in me, they may be assured it shall never be abused—and I beg they will be persuaded that as no man can possibly...
Having occasion to go to Poughkeepsie for the purpose of transacting some business with His Excellency Govr Clinton, I shall set off for that place this Morning, and shall not probably return until tomorrow Evening—I give you this information that you may during my absence take upon yourself the superintendance of the Army. With great regard & esteem I am Dear Sir Your Most Obedt Servt MHi :...
To the General Officers of the Army. assembled in Council at the New Building April 17th 1783 Gentlemen It is well known to you that the first intimations of a general Peace have been given to us some time past by a casual conveyance, and published accordingly to the Army, and that the same intelligence has since been received by Sir Guy Carleton from the British Court, in consequence of...
It is represented to me, that Capn Day, of the 7th Massachusetts Regiment, is now, not only able to attend his Duty in Camp, but that, his long absence, is considered in an unfavorable point of Light, by the Inhabitants in the part of the Country where he resides. As you will remember, the Appointment of Capn Day to superintend & Muster the Recruits at Springfield, was made in Consequence of...
A few days ago General Lincoln delivered me your favor of the 7th respecting the Enemy’s force at Penobscot, and the apprehension of the Inhabitants of the eastern part of your State in consequence of the menacing appearances in that quarter—at the same time I recd a Letter from the two Houses of your Legislature on the same subject. After conversing pretty fully with the Secretary at War & Mr...
A few days since, I reced your favor of the 25th of January—There is such an absolute dearth of News here, that I cannot undertake to give you a single syllable in return for what you was so good as to send me. Without amusement or avocation, I am spending another Winter (I hope it will be the last that I shall be kept from returning to domestic life) amongst these rugged and dreary Mountains,...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 1st instant. Congress have been pleased to promote Colonels Greaton, Dayton & Putnam to the rank of Brigadiers, by their Act of the 7th of this Month. Altho’ we have no official Accounts of the Evacuation of Charles Town, yet the certainty of that event is placed beyond dispute by the publications in New York; at which place General Leslie...
I have been favored with your Letters of the 18th & 25th Ulto the former enclosing Captain Bannisters application to you; the latter giving advice of the departure of the french Fleet. I approve of your appointing Capt. Day to succeed Captain Bannister in the duty of receiving mustering & forwarding Recruits from Springfield; as you have been particularly acquainted with the mode of conducting...
It was not until the arrival of the last eastern Mail, that I was favoured with your Letter of the 29th Novembr. Of the Prisoners you mention to have returned from Canada, not more than five have come on to Camp; nor do I know what has become of the remainder of them; I wish (if it can possibly be avoided) they may not be lost to the public. The report of the relief of Gibralter has proved but...
The Powers of equal date herewith Authorize you to proceed to Tappan in Orange County in the State of New York and there meet Commissioners from the British for the purposes mentiond in your powers. You are to pay the most pointed attention to the nature of your Powers which are founded upon Letters Patent under the Great Seal of the United States bearing date the 16th instant a Copy of which...
By His Excellency George Washington Esqr. General and Commander in Chief of the Forces of the United States of America. To Major General Willm Heath and Major General Henry Knox. Whereas the Honorable the Delegates of the United States in Congress assembled, have been pleased to authorize and impower me, by Letters patent under the Great Seal bearing date the 16th day of September Anno Domini...
Altho I must confess that it appears to me rather surprizing to have a request for so many Gentlemen, and of such Rank, to be absent from their Commands, at this Time of the Campaign, on Business to their State—Yet as it is the particular Desire of the Officers of the Line, I give my permission as requested, for all the Gentlemen except Major General Knox; who cannot by any means be spared...
I have received your Letter of this Day, accompanied with one from Colo. Canfield at Stamford, informg—the Detention of Mr Corne & others as Prisoners. I am pleased with the Conduct of Colo. Canfield & his Attention to his Duty—& as it seems there is no other Way to reduce Genl Birch to an Observance of the Convention respectg the Place where Flags are to be received, than by the Detention of...
I do myself the pleasure to inform you, that Major General Mcdougall, by a letter of the 23d instant, has declined the prosecution of the Charges which he meant to exhibit against you. His reasons are, That the points of military duty, in dispute between you, will have been decided by his Court Martial; and that an altercation between Officers of your Rank might have an ill aspect in the eyes...
Your two favors of Yesterdays date are come to Hand. I approve your proposition of four light Infantry Companies instead of five, doing the Duty of the Lines in future—and you will give your Orders accordingly as soon as you please. With much Regard I am Dear Sir Your most Obedt Servant MHi : Heath Papers.
I have received your Letter of Yesterday with the papers inclosed. I return you Major Ashleys Letter with Dakings Papers. You will direct Major Ashley to Order the Flag with M r Daking to return immediately to the Enemy’s Lines. As this is the second instance in which Genl Birch has contravened my Intentions in grantg Flaggs to come from the Enemys Lines by other Routes than that of Dobb’s...
After I have seen the troops maneuvered upon the point tomorrow morning, I shall go down to Peekskill to look at the Ground in that neighbourhood. You will be pleased to order a Company of light Infantry to march to Peekskill tomorrow morning by break of day and there wait my orders. They must go provided with two days provision. I am Dear Sir yr most obt Servt MHi : Heath Papers.
I have been favored with your Letter of this date. It is my opinion that Major Porter be bro’t to a Court Martial immediately, as I have no idea of an officer being absent, in the manner he has, without being made a public example of. Whatever Shoes are wanted for the use of the Men, over the number assigned them, may be drawn for & charged to their respective Accounts. I am much obliged by...
Your favor of yesterday has been duly received—I think it proper that the trial of Major Keith should commence as soon as possible—The affair of the Cartridge Boxes, together with the appointment of a Conductor to the 3d Masstts Brigade, have been referred to Genll Knox. If Capt. Dorence is unfit for the Duty of the Field, it would be best for him to relieve Capt. Benton at the Hospitals, as I...
By the Contents of Sir Guy Carletons Letter which came inclosed in yours of this Day, I find it is unnecessary for you to proceed to Phillips’s House—Sir Guy being disappointed in not obtaing Passports for M. Chief Justice Smyth to come out, he will not, he says, trouble an Officer of your Rank to be the Bearer of a Bundle of papers only—but adds that they shall be sent out in the ordinary...
His Excellency Sir Guy Carleton having requested a Passport for Chief Justice Smith to repair to the Head Quarters of the American Army, in order to lay before me the proceedings of a Court Martial on the tryal of Capt. Lippincut for the Murder of Capt. Huddy, with other Documents and Explanations which he says "he has no doubt will give full Satisfaction." I do therefore, from an earnest...
Having desired you to meet an Officer from Sir Guy Carleton for the purpose mentioned in your appointment & authority, you will proceed to execute said business. In the course of which, you may inform the Officer you meet, that as I have no connection with, or controul over any Person in the Line in which Mr Smith walks; as the question before us is, in my opinion, purely of a military nature...
Being very confident of your attention to the several objects entrusted to your care during my absence; in reply to your Favor of the 28th, I have only to observe that I think it but reasonable that the Officers who have been prevented, by their attendance on the Court Martial for the tryal of Majr General McDougall, from visiting their Families, should be indulged with leave of absence for a...
For your Information—& that you may know the Object of your Mission, I inclose to you a Transcript of my Letter to Sir Guy Carleton, which is herewith committed to your Care to be forwarded as soon as possible. Before the Time of your going to Phillips’s House, I shall have the pleasure of seeing you, or conveying to you in Writing, my Sentiments more fully on the subject of your Meeting. With...
I have received your favor of Yesterday, and shall cause attention to be paid to the several matters contained therein. I am dear Sir With sentiments of esteem Your Most Hble Servt MHi : Heath Papers.
I have this moment received a Letter from Count De Rochambeau (by one of His Aids, in five days from Williamsburg) informing me that he is on his way to Philadelphia—that He will be there the 13th or 14th, and wishes for an Interview with me—for this purpose I shall set out in the morning very early, & have only to request your usual attention. I am Dr Sir Yr Most Obedt Servt P.S. I entreat...
The Resolve of Congress relative to the Forage belonging to this State, which was used by the Army during the last Campaign, was perticularly addressed to you; and is that matter hitherto been wholly under your direction, I return you the Report of the Arbitrators, and request you to bring this matter to a conclusion agreeably to the Instructions that have been given. I also return the report...
I am favord with your Letter of this date. see 8 July 1782 from Heath As Mr Marbois consents, I have no objection to the two men in question being attached to one of the Regiments, to do duty untill they are demanded. I am Sir Your most Obedt Servt MHi : Heath Papers.
Mr Benson & Mr Smith have nominated Judge Hobart as a third person to determine with them the Disputes between the Army & the Contractors. The Gentlemen will attend to the Business on Wednesday next, and wish it may be accomplished at Poughkeepsie as that place will be much more convenient to them than any other; but if it should appear necessary that a large Number of Witnesses must attend...
I am this moment setting out for Albany, and shall be absent a few days—I give you this information for the Regulation of your own conduct; and request in the mean time, you will give me any intelligence you may receive, which you shall deem of sufficient consequence for communication by Express. I am Dear Sir With great esteem Your Most Obedt Servt MHi : Heath Papers.
Mr Benson the Attorney General of this State, who was appointed by me, and Mr Melachton Smith who was nominated by Mr Sands, have undertaken as Refferees to settle the matters in dispute between the Army and the Contractors for furnishing the Garrison of West Point &c. These two Gentlemen are to name a third agreeably to the mode pointed out by the Contract; and are to meet on the 8th day of...
By the Order of this day you will see the Army is to go into Tents as soon as conveniently may be—The ground of Encampment for the different Corps ought to be as contiguous to their present Cantonments as the Nature of the ground will admit. I am Dear Sir Your Most Obedt Servant MHi : Heath Papers.
As the Referees, who are to settle the disputes between the Army and Mr Sands & Co., will sit for that purpose in a few days, it will be necessary for the Gentn of the Army to appoint some Person to attend in their name to conduct the business; I wish you therefore to make it known to the Army under your Command, that such Person may be appointed, and that he properly prepare necessary papers,...
In answer to your private letter of the 19th, I have to observe that it was not my intention by the Order of the 4th of April, to call in question, or to deprive you, of any part of the Command which was confirmed in the subsequent one of the 9th Instt. The Order of the 9th (last mentioned) did not proceed from any doubt in my mind of the meaning of the first, but because different...
I have received your favors of yesterday & of this date by Major Lyman. I can have no objection to the assembling of the Officers of the Masstts Line for there obtaining, in a decent manner, the regular settlement of their Just dues, but am very sorry there should be any occasion for such proceedings; I supposed that Congress had passed Resolutions, directing the several States or Mr Morris to...
I have to reply to your three favors of the 15th. A Copy of your Application in favor of Colo. Greatons Appointment to be a Brigadier, is submitted to the Consideration of the Sectry at War, with my Approbation—and the promotion will probably take place. The Commandg Officer of the post at Dobbs Ferry, should undoubtedly be furnished with a public Horse for the purpose of sendg by Land such...
I have recd yours of Yesterday—I am sorry to hear that Desertion still prevails—To render this Practice less frequent, I wish you would order the Officers commanding at the different Rendezvous in Massachusetts, to give Directions to those Officers, who are charged with the Conducting of the Recruits to Camp, in case of Desertion on the March, to return to them immediately descriptive Lists of...
Your favor of yesterday has been duly received. A Deputy Commy of Prisoners for the Post at Dobb’s Ferry, has been already ordered, who will, I hope, liberate you from those constant applications from that post; and as Capt. Pray’s duty must be encreased at that Post, I wish you to grant him what additional Boats & Men you may think necessary. I must depend upon your constant attention to the...
I have to reply to your three favors of the 29th May & 1st Instants. The private Soldiers paroled by Sir Guy Carleton, must be ordered to join & do Duty in their Regiments—I have given Directions to Our Comry of Prisoners to inform the British Comry that such will be my Orders in all such Cases—& that they will be credited to their Account. Capt. Pray is directed to send in the Officers...
In Addition to the Instructions I gave in my Letter of the 26th respecting Flags, I think it necessary to observe, that no Persons ought to be permitted to pass or repass under Cover of Flags, except those whose Names are properly inserted: As it is reported, that some People having availed themselves of such Opportunities, have formerly come into Jersey without any legal Permission. By the...
I have received your Letter of the 25th containing the Dispatches from Sir Guy Carleton; and the other Papers mentioned therein. I return those belonging to the British Officers on Parole at Dobbs Ferry, who may be permitted to go into the Enemy’s Lines—In future you will be pleased in the first instance to grant Flags to all such Persons as shall have Passports for the purpose from Congress,...
I am favord with your Letter of Yesterday—I consent to Colo. Greatons Sending a Serjeant to Boston for the purpose you mention provided no charge is to be brought against the public therefor. I am Sir Your very Obed. serv. MHi : Heath Papers.
I have received your two favrs of the 16th of this Day. In Reply to the postscript of the first, I can only say, that the Report of the Commissioner who met at Elizabeth Town, has been sent on to Congress, with a Submission to them, how far Exchanges in future shall be practised—How ever desirable all Exchanges may be, nothing can be done untill I am furnished with the Determination of...
As soon as you have concluded with the officers, the Quantity of Rum or Whiskey which will be best to be commuted, agreeable to the Orders of this Date—you will be pleased to notify Mr Sands (who if necessary, will attend you for the purpose) and agree with him upon the particular Articles in which the Compensation shall be made. With Regard & Esteem I am Sir Your most Obedt Servt MHi .
I transmit you herewith, a complaint of Lt Allen against the settlement of Rank as fixed by the Board of Officers for the Massachusetts Line. It signifies very little to appoint Boards of Officers for these matters, if their determinations are not to be final—and I am to be eternally troubled on the Subject—If, thro’ any mistake or otherwise, manifest injury is done to individuals by the late...
In reply to your favor of the 8th, 10th, & 11th I have to observe that Mr Parker ought to be transferred; that the subject mentioned in your private Letter of the 10th should excite particular vigilence on the part of the Officers; that Leiut. Col. Badham should be relieved; that as General Glover (an extract from whose Letter I enclose) has at the request of the General Court appointed...