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Your note of the 5th. instant accompanying the information given to you by G.—— M.—— on the 4th. of March, came safe on friday. The letter he refers to, as having been written to me, is not yet received; but others from Mr. Monroe of similar complexion, and almost of as imperious a tone from that government, have got to hand. That justice & policy should dictate the measures with which we are...
I am thus far on my way to Philadelphia, and if the disagreeableness of the weather (for it is now raining) does not prevent it, shall proceed to Bladensburgh at least to night; but be my dispatch what it probably may, the mail which leaves this tomorrow, will arrive in Philadelphia before me. This being the case, and time pressing, I forward the enclosed suggestions of Mr. Jefferson and Mr....
Your letter of the 24th. ulto., (enclosing a letter from Govr. St. Clair, and sundry papers relating to the subject of the settlements which have been made under purchases from Judge Symmes) I have duly received. The Secretary of State, as well as I recollect, has already written both to Govr. St. Clair & Judge Symmes on this subject; but whether he has or has not, it can make no material...
After my letter of yesterday was despatched to you, the draught of the answer to Mr. Adet was presented for my approbation, with the opinions of the Gentlemen about me, that it would be expedient to publish it, and without delay. It appeared also, by information from the Secretary of State, that as far as public opinion had been expressed on the occasion, that this measure was looked to, &...
The question of admitting modifications of the debt of the U.S. to France, having been the subject of consultation with the heads of the Departments & the Attorney General, and an unanimous opinion given thereon which involves the enclosed propositions from the French Minister, you will be pleased, under the form of a report to me, to prepare what may serve as an Answer, making it conformable...
In due course of Post I have received your Letters of the 5th and 8th instant. & thank you for the information contained in them. Tomorrow I leave this for Philadelphia. the advices which I may receive this Evening by the Post, will fix my route by Baltimore (as usual)—or by the one I intended to have come—that is, by Reading, the Canals between the Rivers, Harrisburgh, Carlisle &a—In either...
Your letter dated the 3d. inst. inclosing a Copy of the instructions you have forwarded to Mr. Short, came to my hands by the mail of Wednesday. The appointment of that gentleman to negotiate the Loans in Holland, and the Instructions you have given for his government, meet my approbation. The first as no inconvenience it is conceived will result from his absence from Paris, is a measure of...
I received your favor of yesterday, this moment, when I am on the eve of a journey to Virginia. The opinion which you have given as to its being necessary to submit the new article to the Senate being in direct opposition to that of the Secretaries and the Attorney general, has occasioned some embarrassments with me. For I always understood it to be the sense of the majority of the Senate,...
[ Philadelphia, November 28, 1795. Second letter of November 28 not found. ] In the “List of Letters from G—— Washington to General Hamilton,” Columbia University Libraries, two letters to H from Washington for November 28, 1795 , are listed.
Having written to you on Saturday the 11th instant (accompanying it with enclosures) without hearing any thing from you in the course of last week, or by the Mail of this day, I begin to have some uneasy Sensations for the fate of my letter—To this cause, & to my solicitatude to have the Papers returned, you must ascribe the trouble of receiving this letter. If my last got safe to your hands,...
[ Philadelphia, September 6, 1796. Second letter of September 6 not found. ] In the “List of Letters from G—— Washington to General Hamilton,” Columbia University Libraries, two letters from Washington to H September 6, 1796, are listed.
While at Charleston I appointed Robert Cochran of that place to command the revenue Cutter for the station of South Carolina, & empowered him, with the approbation of the Governor & general Moultrie, to appoint his mates. I have appointed John Howell Commander—Hendricks Fisher, first Mate, and John Wood second mate of the revenue Cutter to be stationed on the coast of Georgia. You will...
You would oblige me by draughting an answer to the enclosed Address from Richmond (Virginia). If you can, conveniently do it, to go by the Post of tomorrow, it would be wished; if not, it will do very well against Friday’s Post. If you are not engaged & will take dinner with me to day I should be glad of your Company—Govr Blount & Genl Pickens will be here. Yours always & sincerely ALS , DLC :...
For carrying into execution the provisions in that behalf made by the Act, entitled, “An Act making appropriations for the support of Government for the year one thousand seven hundred & ninety three.” I do hereby authorise you the said Secretary of the Treasury to agree and contract with the President, Directors and Company of the Bank of the United States for a loan or loans to the United...
As you are about to meet on other business, it is my desire, that you would take the enclosed application into consideration. It is not my wish, on one hand, to throw unnecessary obstacles in the way of gratifying the wishes of the applicants. On the other, it is incumbent on me to proceed with regularity. Would not the granting a Patent then, which I believe is always the concluding Act and...
Pay to the Secretary of State, out of the fund appropriated to defray the Contingent charges of Government, the sum of Fifteen hundred Dollars, for the use of Colo. Innes. LB , DLC:GW . James Innes was being sent as a commissioner to inform the government of Kentucky about the state of negotiations on navigation of the Mississippi River (see Edmund Randolph to GW, 7 Aug. , and n.2). Secretary...
Letter not found: to Alexander Hamilton, 22 March 1796. On 24 March, Hamilton wrote GW: “I had the honor to receive yesterday your letter of the 22.”
For carrying into execution the provisions in that behalf made by the Act, entitled, “An Act making appropriations for the support of Government for the year one thousand seven hundred & ninety three”; I do hereby authorise you the said Secretary of the Treasury to agree and contract with the President, Directors and Company of the Bank of the United States for a loan or loans to the United...
Your letter of the 30th September enclosing a Contract entered into by the Collector of Wilmington in North Carolina with James McStephens & Henry Toomer for the stakage of the shoals of Cape Fear river, I have duly received. As I approve of the Contract, I have transmitted the same with my approbation to the Collector of Wilmington. I wrote to you from the head of Elk, informing you of my...
Whilst I was in Wilmington waiting breakfast to day, I made the best enquiry time & circumstances would permit, for some fit character to fill the office lately held by Doctr Latimer. Several persons were mentioned, but the weight of information was in favor of one Andrew Barratt. He was spoken of by Mr Vining as a man of respectable character, of decision and temper. He now is, or lately has...
Pay or cause to be paid to the Secretary of State Forty thousand Dollars to be applied to the purposes of the Act, intitled “An Act providing the means of Intercourse between the United States and foreign Nations,” for which this shall be your warrant. Given under my hand at Philadelphia the nineteenth day of March, in the year one thousand seven hundred & ninety one. LC , George Washington...
Having no doubt that the petition contained in the enclosed Gazette, will make its appearance in the Virginia Assembly; and nearly as little of its favourable reception in that body, I resolved to give you the perusal of it, at this moment. But my principal view in writing to you now, is, to request that you would desire young Fayette and his Tutor to proceed to this place without delay;...
[ Mount Vernon, October 23, 1793. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from G—— Washington to General Hamilton,” Columbia University Libraries.
As I am uncertain of the condition & even the Office in which the papers containing accounts of our disbursments for subsistence of British prisoners remain; and as it is not improbable that some negotiations may (whenever our Union under the General Government shall be completed) take place between the United States & Great Britain, in which an accurate understanding of those Accots. will...
In the moment I was closing & dispatching my letters to the Post Office, I learnt from the Attorney General of the U.S. that you would be here on the 17th. My mind being continually uneasy on Acct. of Young Fayette, I cannot but wish (if this letter should reach you in time, and no reasons stronger than what have occurred against it) that you would request him, and his Tuter, to come on to...
Upon a full consideration of the reasons offered by Mr. Short, in his correspondence with you, for removing the restrictions laid upon him by his present instructions, so far as relates to his not opening a loan for more than a certain sum and not being allowed to open a new Loan until the terms of the preceding one shall have been ratified here, I have thought it expedient, & for the interest...
Motives of Justice, friendship & candour induce me to send the enclosed for your perusal. Let me know the truth of this matter. What answer is proper to be given to it, and by whom. The writer is urgent to receive one, having called once or twice since the delivery of it, for This purpose. I am &c. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. At the bottom of the page of the letter book...
By pushing through the rain (which fell more or less on Saturday, Sunday and Monday) I arrived in this City before noon on Tuesday; without encountering any accident on the road, or any thing so unpleasant as the badness of the ways, after the rains had softened the earth and made them susceptible of deep impression, of the Wheels. How you passed through the Glades after the various accounts...
Annexed to your Statemen⟨t⟩ of “Principles and course of Procee⟨d⟩ings” I have given the certificat⟨e⟩ required. I am yours always ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see the introductory note to H to Frederick A. C. Muhlenberg, December 16, 1793 . See also H to the Select Committee Appointed to Examine the Treasury Department, March 24, 1794 ; H to...
The posture of affairs in Europe, particularly between France and Great Britain, places the United States in a delicate situation; and requires much consideration of the measures which will be proper for them to observe in the War betwn. those Powers. With a view to forming a general plan of conduct for the Executive, I have stated and enclosed sundry questions to be considered preparatory to...