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Two ships of force with their Tenders have Sailed up Hudsons River —I am apprehensive that they design to seize the passes in the Highlands by Land wh[ich] I am informed may be done by a small body of Men. I must therefore request you instantly to desire Genl Ten Broeck to March down as great force as he can Collect to secure them, particularly the post where the Road runs over Anthonies nose...
Valley Forge, February 16, 1778 . Describes sufferings at Camp because of lack of food and clothing. Asks Clinton to do all that is possible to forward supplies. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Since my letter of the 5th, on the subject of the number of Men necessary to compleat the Quota of your State, I have recollected a matter in the composition of Colo. Lambs Regt which I wish had been attended to at that time. Two independent Companies of Pennsylvania; consisting at present of only 39 Men, have been for some time past annexed to that Regt and are included in the number of 304...
A Captain who escaped from New York on Saturday Evening and who arrived here this morning, informs, that about Three Thousand Troops (British & Hessians) were embarked from the City & Staten Island when he came away. It was generally said, they had in contemplation an expedition to Chesepeak Bay and to make a descent on the Eastern Shore. There were some who conjectured, they mean to go up the...
One Losee, formerly an Inhabitant of this State, now a Deserter from the Enemy, is send to your Excellency’s disposal. It is asserted by a Certain Berrian (immediately from the Enemy) that Losee, was an Emissary charged with Dispatches for the Enemy at the Northward; I am also told Col. Da y ton has recd similar information of him. I have &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I last evening recd the inclosed from Congress with a request that I would take measures for carrying the plan recommended by Colo. Hartley into execution. The advices which I have just recd from different quarters bear the strongest marks of an immediate evacuation of New York. These considerations induce me, should it be deemed expedient, to make an addition to Colonel Cortlands command by...
Your favor of the 12th instant was delivered me last night. I recollect, that Permission was granted Mrs Hatfield to visit her Husband, & had not the least Doubt, but she would be suffered to return whenever she had an Inclination, unless some singular Circumstances should render it ineligible for a Day or two. Her Detention seems to be by the Mayor, to whom she was referred for a Passport. As...
Capt. Machin has been employed since the year 1776 in the engineering Branch, without ever coming to any regular settlement for his Services. He does not chuse to fix any price himself, and I am really ignorant of what is just and proper. You have been a witness of a good deal of his work, and he is willing to submit the matter to your decision. Captain Machin holds a Commission in the...
The president of Congress has transmitted me Your Excellencys letter to the delegates of New York, representing the calamitous situation of the North Western frontier of that State—accompanied by a similar application from the Pennsilvania Assembly—and a Resolve of the 25th directing me to take the most effectual Measures for the protection of the inhabitants and chastisement of the indians....
The moment I recd yours of the 3d I gave orders to Genl Heath to detach the remaining three Regiments of the York Brigade to Albany there to put themselves under the command of Brig. Genl Clinton who has orders to dispose of them as circumstances may require—should you receive any information that they are not necessary above, you will be pleased to communicate it to Generall Heath, that their...
I have been honoured with yours of the 20th and 24th instants; the latter by Mr Harkermir who gives a melancholy account of the distresses of the inhabitants at the German Flatts. To defend an extensive frontier against the incursions of a desultory Enemy is next to impossible; but still if you think the addition of another Regiment, ill as I can spare it, or a change of position in the troops...
I was favoured to day with your Letter of the 26 Instant. It gave me extreme concern to hear of the complaint, which you transmitted. There is nothing I wish for more, than a happy understanding between the Inhabitants and every part of the Army—and this I have constantly endeavoured to promote. I have written to Major Strang & Mr Hyatt, inclosing a Letter to Major Lee with a copy of the...
In the close of my letter of the 5th Instant, I had the pleasure to acknowlege your favors of the 18th & 21st Ultimo. Besides the 80 battalions of Infantry, it is the intention of Congress to preserve as many of the 16 additional and other corps as can be kept up by means of incorporation, or continued in their present condition—considering at the same time such of the men composing these...
I am very sorry to find by the Report of the Baron Steuben there is no probability that we shall be put in possession of the Western Posts this fall—in consequence of this information and the late season of the year I have directed the Movement of the Troops to be stopped, & the preparations to be suspended until farther Orders. Major Giles (who is the bearer of this Letter) having occasion to...
[ Middlebrook, New Jersey, May 16, 1779. ] Refers to Clinton case of Thomas Done who had lost his sight in the service. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have received your two favors of the 25th and 29th. I am obliged to your Excellency for the assurance of all the assistance in the power of this State in case of a co-operation with our allies—The degree of aid which will be necessary for this State cannot well be determined before hand—it will depend on the force of the Enemy and the state of our magazines at the moment. In the former we...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 24th inclosing the Copy of a Letter From Col. Willet—From which I have learnt with great concern the repeated depredations that have been committed on your Western frontier, and should be extremely happy (were it in my power consistent with the general state of affairs) to afford a sufficient Detachment from this Army to cover the whole...
I yesterday evening received Your favor of the 13th and thank you for transmitting me a copy of Your Brother’s Letter. I am happy to find the Troops are in such health and Spirits. Major Gibbs inclosed you Yesterday the Charles Town papers of the 29th of May and 4th of June, which would shew Your Excellency all the operations in that quarter to those dates; and that matters are far short of...
I am extremely sorry that it is in my power to inform you, that a Captain Colson of the 5th Virginia Regiment a few days ago, violently wounded a Mr Vantassel of this State, of which he died in a little time after —The moment I was apprised of it, I directed a Letter to be written & sent to Genl Muhlenburg, to whose Brigade he belonged, to have him secured, in order that he might be delivered...
Your favor of 4th Inst. I receiv’d this Morning —As the Movement of the Enemy & their Designs are as yet uncertain, I have to request that you will keep as large a Body of the Militia as you can collect, & have them in as good order as Circumstances will permit, in case Genl Howe should Incline up North River[.] I have no doubt but you have form’d such a Plan with General Heard as will best...
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 3, 1779 . Discusses plans for Indian expedition. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
On monday I received your favor of the 22d Inst. I should be extremely sorry if the incursions you apprehend, should take place. From the defeats and disappointments the Indians met with the last campaign, when pushed on and supported by a formidable regular Army, we had reason to hope, that they would remain peaceable, at least for some time. However there is no reasoning with precision from...
The time not being very remote, in which our intended operations must commence—it is necessary to put some of the troops designed for the expedition in motion, to the several points from whence they are to operate. In consequence of this—the troops now at Minisink will be immediately ordered from that post. As this circumstance may create apprehensions in the minds of the people for their...
I this minute received a Letter from General Sullivan of the 30th Ulto and a Copy of One to yo⟨ur⟩ Brother the General; of both which I inclose you Copies. Your Excellency will be pleased to direct the march of Lt Colo. pauling at such time—and in such manner as you shall judge best. You will also receive a Letter ⟨addre⟩ssed to you, which came with ⟨mine.⟩ I have inclosed a line to the...
In consequence of the intelligence from Your Excellency communicated to me by General Schuyler, I have put the New York Brigade under orders to march tomorrow morning for the North River. They will proceed to Kings ferry, and from thence in boats to New burgh—where sloops with provisions must be ready to convey them to Albany. General Schuyler will give Your Excellency a full account of our...
Your favour of the 23d February was duly handed me; and I am thankful for the attention and activity, with which you are promoting the public service. As you have all the circumstances immediately before you, you can best judge whether the cannon, of which you speak, will be most useful to defend the obstructions which are forming, or at the places where they now are; and you will be pleased...
I have just received a letter from Mr Des-touche, commandant of the French fleet, of which the inclosed is a translation. I am persuaded Your Excellency will do every thing for the accommodation of our allies, which the extreme necessities of our own army will permit. I shall be obliged to you to inform me how the matter Mr Des-touche mentions may stand, and how far it will be in your power to...
Yours of Yesterday reached me at this place. Considering the situation in which you say the hard Bread is, instead of bringing it forward, I have directed Genl Sullivan’s and Lord Stirlings divisions to draw three days each before they leave King’s Ferry. If any remains after supplying them, it may be sent back to the Forts. Whether the Enemy’s real design’s are southward or Eastward, in order...
I have had the Honor to receive your Excellencys Favor of the 5th Communicatg Intelligence from St. Croix—for which I beg you to accept my acknowledgement & thanks. It seems we are comg to a period when we are exceedgly in Danger of being imposed upon by the Insidious Measures of our Enemy—You have doubtless seen the Intelligence from N. York & the Debates in Parliament upon the American...
Your letter of the 7th instant, with its inclosure, did not reach me ’till yesterday. The intelligence, it communicates, is of a nature both serious and important. Indeed, the step it announces, as about to be taken by the British, would be one so extraordinary in every view, as to justify a question, whether the indications, which are alleged to have been given, have not rather proceeded from...