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Your favour of the 14th instt with a Postscript of the 24th came to my hands yesterday: and I hereby acknowledge the receipt of Mr Wilkes’s draught on the Cashier of the Bank of Pennsylvania for the sum of two thousand five hundred dollars on account of our joint concern in the lotts in Coxburgh—and which, as appears by the items of an account enclosed overpays my dividend of the receipts...
To the enclosed, I answered in a note, that the whole of the business to which it related, was entrusted to you: from whom, if application was made, complete information might be obtained. A few days afterwards, Mr Cooper applied to me personally; intimated that the land was valuable; that he was desirous of purchasing; and would give a good price for it. I answered as before, and added that...
Your favor of the 17th instt has been duly received. My enquiries after your health have been constant—and my concern for the ill-state of it—has been sincere. I beg you will not suffer the business, in which I am jointly interested, give you a moments concern; for I can assure you it has never occupied a thought of mine. But in order to make the transacting of it as easy to yourself, and as...
(Private) Dear Sir, Philadelphia Mar. 31st 1794. Your favor of the 20th instt, with its enclosures, came duly to hand; and for which you have my particular thanks. As there are those who affect to believe that Great Britain has no hostile intention towards this Country, it is not surprizing that there should be found among them characters who pronounce the Speech of Lord Dorchester to the...
Your favor of the 18th instt enclosing a statement of sales of lots in Coxburgh, belonging to us, has been duly received; and I thank you for the particular manner in which they are rendered. I did not mean to give you so much trouble. To know summarily what had been sold, and what remained on hand, was all I had in view. I hereby acknowledge the receipt of a Bank note (New York) for Sixteen...
(Private) Dear Sir, Philadelphia 27th Novr 1793 Not having the letters at hand, I am unable to refer to dates; but the one with which you were pleased to favour me, dated sometime in September, did not reach my hands before I had left this City. Immediately, however, upon the receipt of it (at my own house in Virginia) I put it under cover to the Secretary of War with directions to answer it...
[ Philadelphia ] September 14, 1791 . Discusses the possibility of the British establishing a post south of Lake Champlain. Df , in the handwriting of H, RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters, 1790–1799, National Archives. Clinton was governor of New York.
Your letter of the 7th instant, with its inclosure, did not reach me ’till yesterday. The intelligence, it communicates, is of a nature both serious and important. Indeed, the step it announces, as about to be taken by the British, would be one so extraordinary in every view, as to justify a question, whether the indications, which are alleged to have been given, have not rather proceeded from...
With very great sensibility I have recd the honor of your letter dated the 10th instt and consider the kind & obliging invitation to your House until suitable accomodations can be provided for the President as a testimony of your friendship & politeness; for which I shall ever retain a grateful sense—But if it should be my lot (for heaven knows it is not my wish) to appear again in a public...
The bearer Mr Timothy Tuttle has been with me to obtain on some terms—I did not enquire into them—part of the lands we have a joint interest in up the Mohawk River. The answer I have given him is, that whatever you shall do concerning them I will abide by. With great esteem & regd I am—My dear Sir—Yr most Obedt and Affecte Hble Sert ALS , NjHi ; LB , DLC:GW . For the New York land held jointly...
At length, I have obtained the means for discharging the balle I am owing you. Mr Morris will direct his corrispondent in New York to pay you the sum of Eight hundred and forty dollars, which will be about the amount of £325.6.0 (the balle of your Acct as rendered to Jany last) with intt thereon of Seven prCt till the middle of this month. As this is intended as a letter of advice only, I...
Not having heard, or not recollecting who the President of the Society of the Cincinnati in the State of New York is, I take the liberty of giving you the trouble of the enclosed. I am endeavouring by the sale of Land, to raise money to pay for my Moiety of the purchase on the Mohawk River—So soon as this is effected I will write your Excellency more fully. In the meantime, with every good...
I promised you a letter by the last Post, but it was not in my power to fulfill it, business not my own, & with which I really ought not to be troubled, engrosses so large a portion of my time (having no assistance) that that which is essential to me, is entirely neglected. I now send you Hooe & Harrisons second Bill upon Mr Sylvanus Dickenson; altho’ I hope, & expect the first will have been...
A few days ago I had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 5th Ulto—Your other letter of the 26th of December came duely to hand, and should not have remained so long unacknowledged had I not been in daily expectation of accompanying my answer with a remittance. Disappointment followed disappointment, but my expectation being kept up, I delayed writing from one Post day to another until...
When the Marqs de la Fayette left this place, he expected to embark abt the 14th or 15th Instt on board the Nymph frigate, at New York, for France. Therefore, as this event may have taken place before this letter gets that far, I take the liberty of putting the enclosed packet under cover to you, with a request, if he should have Sailed to forward it by the first French Packet which follows....
A few days ago I had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 12th Instt. Altho’ I felt pain from your Silence, I should have imputed it to any cause rather than a diminution of friendship. The warmth of which I feel too sensibly for you, to harbour a suspicion of the want of it in you, without being conscious of having given cause for the change—having ever flatterd myself that our regards...
After as prosperous a journey as could be expected at this season of the year, I arrived at my seat the day before Christmas, having previously divested myself of my official character—I am now a private Citizen on the banks of the Potomack, where I should be happy to see you if your public business would ever permit and where, in the meantime, I shall fondly cherish the remembrance of all...
It was with exceeding great concern I heard by Mr Gouvr Morris that you had had a return of your Fever—I hope it was slight, and that you are now perfectly restored to health—No man wishes it more sincerely than I do. I have been able to negotiate a matter with Mr Robt Morris by which about Seventeen hundred pounds York Currency will be thrown into your hands on my Acct which sum, when...
I do myself the honor to inclose to your Excellency Copy of a Letter from Generals McDougall Clinton & Cortlandt in favor of Majr Hamtramck. My knowledge of that Officer is such, as makes the task of Recommendg him to the notice of the Government of this State, extremely pleasing—being assured that if it shall be in their power to favor his views his conduct will always justify any appointment...
By this Express, your Excellency will receive the requests of the Pay Master and Quarter Master, Generals, for the Loan of One thousand Dollars each, to enable them to supply the present necessities of the Army—if the terms of their proposals are agreeable, I should be very happy in your Excellency’s compliance with their requests. I have the honor to be Your Excellency’s Most Obedt Servant...
Your Excellency’s favor of the 14th of October reached me in a few days, and was replied to by the Post before the last, by some neglect however, the letter was left out of the Mail and remained in the Post Office until the Evening before the last Post should have gone, when it was, with all the Eastern Mail, stolen from thence; nor can I now send you a Copy, for all the Copies of my letters,...
I was extremely glad to hear by a Letter from Colonel Varick that tho’ not yet restored to your usual State of health you was recovering it daily. From many circumstances I think it now pretty evident that the British will leave New York in all next Month Sir Guy Carleton has informed me verbally, through Mr Parker, that he expects to evacuate the City by the 20th and that when the Transports...
It was with great concern I heard of your Indisposition—later accts say you were upon the recovery—and nothing would give me more pleasure than the confirmation of it from under your own hand. I am not able to give you any information on the point you requested, at our parting. Congress have come to no determination yet respecting the Peace Establishment, nor am I able to say when they will. I...
I am very sorry to find by the Report of the Baron Steuben there is no probability that we shall be put in possession of the Western Posts this fall—in consequence of this information and the late season of the year I have directed the Movement of the Troops to be stopped, & the preparations to be suspended until farther Orders. Major Giles (who is the bearer of this Letter) having occasion to...
Under the urgent necessity of making immediate preparations for occupying the Western Posts as soon as they shall be evacuated by the Enemy, which was stated very fully in the Letter I had the honor to address to your Excellency a few day ago by Col. Humphrys; I consider myself obliged to request in the most pressing manner that you will advance five hundred Pounds or a larger sum if...
I have received a call from Congress to repair to Princeton; whether for any special purpose, or generally to remain there till the definitive Treaty shall arrive, the Resolve is not expressive. I mean therefore, if the intention of that body is not more fully explained in a few days, to go prepared for the latter so soon as I can adjust matters here, and Mrs Washington’s health (for at...
Since my return from the Northward I have made particular enquiry into the state of the Boats which may be rendered fit for service on the Western Waters, and find the number very small that are capable of being repaired, the expence of effecting which & transporting them to Schenectady it is imagined will equal or exceed the cost of building new Ones at that place. I have also written by the...
In conformity to Mr Izard’s request, I take the liberty to enclose to your Excellency a Letter from Mrs Delancy to him, describing the outrages which have been committed in the County of West-Chester, I am well assured that every species of licentiousness and disorder hath, and will meet with your displeasure; and I have therefore informed Mr Izard, that measures have been taken, for the...
I have received, and thank you for your Sentiments of a Peace Establishment for this Country—and with the sincerest esteem & regard I have the honor to be Dr Sir, Yr Most Obedt Affecte Servt NN .
In consequence of a Resolution of Congress ordering Arrangements to be formed by me & the Minister at War for the Liberation of Prisoners—& directing a Negociation to be entered into with Sir Guy Carleton, for the Delivery of the British Posts, I am this Moment returned from Ringwood, where I went Yesterday, to meet & have a Conference with General Lincoln—As the Negociation with Sir Guy, has...