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Documents filtered by: Author="Cabinet" AND Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
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The President having required the attendance of the heads of the three departments and of the Attorney general at his house on Monday the 25th of Feb. 1793. the following questions were proposed and answers given. 1. The Governor of Canada having refused to let us obtain provisions from that province or to pass them along the water communication to the place of treaty with the Indians, and the...
The President desires the opinions of the heads of the three departments and of the Attorney General on the following question, to wit. Mr Ternant having applied for money equivalent to three millions of livres to be furnished on account of our debt to France at the request of the Executive of that country, which sum is to be laid out in provisions within the U.S. to be sent to France, Shall...
If the qualification is to be in private, T.J, A.H H.K and E.R, are of opinion, that Mr Cushing should administer the oath to the President at his own house, where such officers, or others, as He may notify, will attend. T.J. and A.H. think, that it ought to be in private. H.K. and E.R. on the other hand think, that the qualification ought to be in public: and that the Marshal of the district...
It is our opinion, My opinion given yesterday was founded on prudential considerations of the moment; though I think it right in the abstract to give publicity to the Act in question. If this is to be done on the present occasion, I see no objection to the above form. I am not, however, satisfied that prudential considerations are not equally ballanced. LS , DLC:GW ; copy, NNGL : Knox Papers....
The President communicated to the Secretary of State, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of War and the Attorney General of the United States, a letter from William S. Smith Esqr. of the 28th of February past, to the Secretary of the Treasury, with sundry Papers—No. I. II. Ill & IV. relating to a negotiation for changing the form of the debt to France; and required their opinion what...
The President of the United States having assembled the heads of the respective departments and the attorney General, laid before them for their advice thereon, sundry communications from the Governor of Georgia, and others, relatively to the recent alarming depredations of the creek Indians upon the state of Georgia. Whereupon after the subject was maturely considered and discussed it was...
That an Agent be sent to the Choctaw nation to endeavor secretly to engage them to support the Chickasaws in their present war with the Creeks, giving them for that purpose arms and ammunition sufficient: and that it be kept in view that if we settle our differences amicably with the Creeks, we at the same time mediate effectually the peace of the Chickasaws & Choctaws, so as to rescue the...
On the letters & papers from Genl Williams & Colo. Smith. It is the opinion that the writers be informed that with respect to vessels armed & equipped in the ports of the U.S. before notice to the contrary was given, the President is taking measures for obliging them to depart from the ports of the U.S. and that all such equipments in future are forbidden: but that as to the prizes taken by...
The President having required the opinions of the heads of the three departments on a letter from Governor Clinton of the 9th inst. stating that he had taken possession of the sloop Polly, now called the Republican, which was arming, equipping & manning by French & other citizens to cruize against some of the belligerent powers, and desiring to know what further was to be done, and they having...
At a meeting of the heads of departments at the President’s this day, on summons from him, a letter from mister Genet of the 15th inst. addressed to the Secretary of state on the subject of the seizure of a vessel by the Govr. of New York as having been armed, equipped & manned in that port with a design to cruize on the enemies of France, was recd as also the draught of an answer prepared by...
At a meeting this day of the heads of departments at the President’s on summons from him, a letter from Messrs Viar & Jaudenes dated June 18. & addressed to the Secretary of state, was read: whereupon it is the opinion that a full detail of the proceedings of the U.S. with respect to the Southern Indians, & the Spaniards be prepared, and a notification as to the particular matters charged in...
At a meeting at the State house of the city of Philadelphia July 8. 1793. Present the Secretary of state, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary at War. It appears that a brigantine called the Little Sarah has been fitted out at the port of Philadelphia, with fourteen cannon, & all other equipments indicating that she is intended as a Privateer to cruise under the authority of France, &...
At a meeting of the heads of the departments at the President’s on summons from him, and on consideration of various representations from the Ministers Plenipotentiary of France & Great Britain on the subject of vessels arming & arriving in our ports, and of prizes it is their opinion that letters be written to the said Ministers informing them that the Executive of the U.S., desirous of...
August 3. 1793 The foregoing rules having been considered by us at several meetings, and being now unanimously approved, they are submitted to the President of the United States. DS , in George Taylor, Jr.’s writing, DLC:GW ; copy (letterpress copy), DLC : Jefferson Papers; LB , DLC:GW ; Df , in Alexander Hamilton’s writing, DLC : Jefferson Papers; copy, DNA : RG 46, Third Congress, 1793–1795,...
That The Minister of the French Republic be informed that the President considers the U. States as bound pursuant to positive assurances, given in conformity to the laws of neutrality, to effectuate the restoration of, or to make compensation for, prizes which shall have been made of any of the parties at war with France subsequent to the fifth day of June last by privateers fitted out of...
At a meeting of the heads of departments & the Attorney general at the Secretary of state’s office Aug. 5. 1793. The case of the Swallow letter of marque at New York, desired to be sent out of our ports, as being a privateer. it is the opinion that there is no ground to make any new order on the subject. The Polly or Republican, in the hands of the Marshal at New York, on a charge of having...
At meetings of the heads of departments & the Attorney General at the President’s on the 1st & 2d of Aug. 1793. On a review of the whole of mister Genet’s correspondence & conduct, it was unanimously agreed that a letter should be written to the Minister of the U.S. at Paris, stating the same to him, resuming the points of difference which had arisen between the government of the U.S. & mister...
At a meeting of the Heads of departments & Attorney General at the President’s on the 31st day of Aug. 1793. A letter from mister Gore to mister Lear, dated Boston Aug. 24. was read, stating that the Roland, a privateer fitted out at Boston & furnished with a commission under the government of France, had sent a prize into that port, which being arrested by the Marshal of the district by...
The Secretary of War humbly reports to the President of the United States That the following measures appear necessary to be taken in order in some degree to place the United States in a situation to guard themselves from injury by any of the belligerent powers of Europe. 1st To have all the small arms of the United States put in order for immediate use. 2dly To have all the cannon in...
A circular letter from the Secretary of state to the Consuls & Vice Consuls of France, informing them that their Exequaturs will be revoked if they repeat certain proceedings, also one to mister Genet covering a copy of the letter of the Secretary of state to mister Gouverneur Morris desiring the recall of mister Genet, were recd & approved. A letter from the Governr of Georgia to the Secy of...
At sundry meetings of the heads of departments & Attorney General from the 1st to the 21st of Nov. 1793. at the President’s several matters were agreed upon as stated in the following letters from the Secretary of state. to wit. Nov. 8. Circular letter to the representatives of France, Gr. Brit. Spain & the U. Netherlands, fixing provisorily the extent of our jurisdiction into the sea at a...
22Cabinet Opinion, 7 December 1793 (Washington Papers)
At a meeting of the heads of departments & Attorney Genl at the President’s on the 7th of Dec. 1793. Mr Genet’s letter of Dec. 3. questioning the right of requiring the address of Consular commissions to the President was read. it is the opinion that the address may be either to the U.S. or to the President of the U.S. but that one of these shoud be insisted on. A letter from James King was...
At a meeting of the heads of departments at the President’s, on the fourteenth day of January 1794. It was propounded by the President, whether in consideration of the eminent services of M. de la Fayette, to the U.S. and his present sufferings, it be not adviseable for the President, in a private, and unofficial character, to address to the King of Prussia a letter, requesting his release on...
At a meeting of the heads of departments Upon consideration of the resolution of the Senate, of January 24. 1794, calling for the correspondences, therein mentioned: General Knox is of opinion, that no part of the correspondences should be sent to the Senate. Colo. Hamilton, that the correct mode of proceeding is to do, what General Knox advises; but that the principle is safe, by excepting...
At a meeting of the heads of departments, and the attorney general at the President’s on the 10th day of March 1794. The intelligence from Kentucky, and the territory no. west of the Ohio, was laid before them; whereupon it was advised 1. that a proclamation issue against the expeditions, understood to be prepared in Kentucky, for the invasion of the Spanish dominions. 2. that a representation...
It is advised unanimously, that Mr Fauchet be informed, that He shall be supplied with the instalments, due in September and November next, according to the manner, expressed in the report of the Secretary of the treasury to the President on this subject. It is proposed by the Secretary of the treasury and of war, and by the attorney general, that it be verbally stated to Mr Fauchet by the...
At a meeting of the heads of departments, and the Attorney general of the U.S. at the President’s, on the twenty sixth day of march 1794. The resolution of congress, of this date, being submitted to them by the President, for their opinion as to the best Mode of executing the same; It is advised unanimously, that the governors of the several States ought to be called upon, to enforce the said...
At a meeting of the heads of departments and Attorney general. March 27. 1794. The Secretary of War, the attorney general and the Secretary of State advise, that the Conyngham be not delivered up to the British owners; the secretary of the treasury dissenting. The Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of war, and the attorney general advise, that the Pilgrim be delivered up to the British...
We are of the opinion, that a passport ought to be granted for a vessel under the above restrictions. I am inclined to think the vessel ought sail not only by the permission, but in consequence of the directions of the President. The same opinion. DS , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters. This opinion appears at the bottom of a letter from Philadelphia merchant Thomas FitzSimons to Edmund...
The President wishes your opinion, as to the step, proper to be taken, upon the inclosed address. To send to congress, what the President thinks unfit for himself, will be unkindly received; being uncivil in itself. To acknowledge the body, as such, is in every view inadmissible. So that the question seems to turn upon this; whether it be better to treat the paper with unqualiffied and silent...