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Documents filtered by: Period="Revolutionary War" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
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That your Memorialist in the year 1775 Joined General Montgomery at Montreal, against the Enemies of America, having then been shortly arived at that place from Spain; And Acted, in the American Army as Lieutenant and Adjutant in a Canadian Regiment raised under Col. Livingston & Proceeded with the Regiment to Quebec. Where he received a Seperate Command to Cut off the Supplies of the Enemy,...
General Washington presents his compliments to Mr Howell and requests the favor of his company at dinner tomorrow 4 oclock. Monday. Privately owned.
I received your Excellency’s favor of the 29th directing a suspension of the troops and stores destined for the Western Posts. The light Infantry company which came from the Lines have returned, & I directed that the clothing drawn by them and the Artillery men to be redelivered to the Clothier. There are certain french refugees in this vicinity under the direction of a Major Merlet, who have...
Mrs Washington & myself heard with much pleasure from Major Jackson, that you & Mrs Morris had it in contemplation a visit to Prince Town; & we join very sincerely in offering you a Bed at our Quarters. The inconvenience of accepting it, can only be to yourselves, as the room is not so commodious as we could wish; but in the crowded situation of this place is equal perhaps to any you could...
In case that Congress should think proper to direct a Peace Establishment there are some Gentlemen of the Pennsylvania Line who wish to be employed and have requested me to mention them to your Excellency. They are Colonel Richard Butler; Lieut. Colonels Harmer; and Mentges; Major Moore Capt. Bowen and Capt. Zeigler of the Infantry; and Captain Armstrong of Lee’s Legion. The Characters of the...
I have the Honor to inclose your Excellency a Copy of my Letter to the President of Congress from which you will see the Measures I have pursued upon an Occasion perplexing & intricate—& if in the Course of it I have so conducted Matters as not to merit your Excellency’s Disapprobation it will make me happy. I conceived that your Excellency would not wish to be Troubled with the Proceedings of...
I received your Excellency’s favors of the twenty fifth and thirtieth of last Month the latter was by far the more agreable for I confess to you Sir that I beheld the attempt to Garrison the Western Posts with Pain and went into so much of it as concerns my Department with infinite Reluctance. I perswade myself that the only effectual means of getting a good American Establishment of any Kind...
That your Excellency may know who takes the liberty of Addressing you I am a Brother to Capt. William Polson who was killed in the Service of Virginia in 1756 and the same that received Seven wounds in the Action in which my Brother lost his life, and for whom Your Excellency were pleased to obtain an Ensigncy in the Regimt you raised in Virginia after General Braddocks defeat, in which Regt I...
You apply to me, My dear Madam, for absolution as tho’ I was your father Confessor; and as tho’ you had committed a crime, great in itself, yet of the venial class—You have reason good—for I find myself strangely disposed to be a very indulgent ghostly adviser on this occasion and, notwithstanding "you are the most offending Soul alive" (that is if it is a crime to write elegant Poetry) yet if...
Inclosed I have the honor of transmitting to your Excellency the last Papers. The New Corps are to embark on Wednesday for Nova Scotia, and agreable to the Adjutant Generals returns there remains only ten thousand Inhabitants to be removed—Sir Guy Carleton in withdrawing his Troops from the upper Part of Long Island to their present Encampment between New Town and Bedford has left the Country...
Once more pardon the Effusions of Gratitude and Esteem, or Command the Muse no more to trouble you, for she Can not be restrain’d Even by timidity. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have been favored with your private letter of the 21st, & should have given it an acknowledgement sooner but thought a few days would have let me more into the views of Congress with respect to the Peace Establishment than I had any knowledge of at the time of its receipt—I am as much in the dark now as ever, and as unable to guess at the number of Troops which may be retained or raised for...
By Doctor Craik I had the honour to write a few lines to your Excellency & having now nothing new to communicate I only repeat that nothing shall be wanting to finish all matters here when I flatter myself it will appear that invention or delay have not been among my faults with Every Respect I am Dear Sir your Excellency’s most obt hum. servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I enclose you the Copy of a Letter from Captn Segond in behalf of himself & Lieut. Boulieu, the only remaining Officers of Pulaski’s Legion—if the peculiar circumstances of those Gentlemen, are such as will exclude them from emoluments to which they ought to be intitled in common with other officers, and if it shall not be in your power to give adequate relief, I must request you will be...
I send you herewith the Estimate and requisition of Pay for the Writers employed under Colo. Varick’s direction, and hope he will be enabled, by the time they have completed their Work, to make a settlement with them. I have the honour to be Sir &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have received your Letter of the 18th, also the duplicate inclosed in yours of the 24th. If the Articles should not have been forwarded you will be informed by the Superintendant of Finance, that the immediate necessity of incurring the expence of transportation has ceased to exist, I am however pleased with your exertions on this, as well as former occasions. The reasons you have given for...
I consider the War Office to be the proper channel of Application for the redress of any hardships under which you and Lieut. Boulieu may labour, from the peculiarity of your circumstances. I have therefore referred your Letter to the Honourable the Secretary at War, with a request, if he should not have it in his power to give adequate relief, that he would lay your case before Congress and...
I have received your favor of the 26th and am much obliged by your attention in procuring the Articles I had requested—I am also glad to find there is at length a prospect that the British will in reality soon take their departure from the United States. Whatever my private sentiments as an Individual may be, respecting the violent Policy which seems in some instances to be adopted; it is not...
I have the honor to enclose for the information of Congress, the report of the Baron Steuben, who was sent into Canada to make arrangements with General Haldimand for withdrawing the British forces from the Posts within the territory of the United States. The Letter from General Haldimand to me, referred to in his Letter of the 13th inst. to the Baron, is not yet come to hand. The...
I was happy enough to receive your Kind favour of the 4th Inst. by the Count Del Verme who did me the Honor to put up with me for a few Days. I am highly pleased with this Nobleman & think myself under great Obligations to your Excellency for his acquaintance. I shall always think myself highly Honored in shewing every civility in my Power to such Gentlemen as you are pleased to Introduce. Let...
I take the earliest opportunity of informing you, that the Baron Steuben has returned from Canada without being able to accomplish any part of the business he had in charge. In consequence of which and of the late Season of the Year, I have judged it impossible to take possession of the Western Posts this fall and have ordered a Stop to be put to the movement of Troops and Stores and to the...
I am very sorry to find by the Report of the Baron Steuben there is no probability that we shall be put in possession of the Western Posts this fall—in consequence of this information and the late season of the year I have directed the Movement of the Troops to be stopped, & the preparations to be suspended until farther Orders. Major Giles (who is the bearer of this Letter) having occasion to...
Upon considering the state of facts reported in your Letter of the 26th I think it expedient that a stop should be put to the movement of the Troops & Stores which were destined for the Western Posts; You will be pleased to give directions accordingly and to transmit the Letter herewith to the Quartr Mastr Genll as it relates to the same subject. I am dear sir with the greatest regard Your...
Some circumstances having intervened that render it impracticable during this fall, for us to take possession of the Posts now occupied by the British on the Western Waters; for the Garrisons of which, the Provisions mentioned in my Letter to you from Saratoga were designed, and which will therefore become in a manner useless to the public, if they cannot be relinquished or disposed of. My...
In consequence of intelligence just received from the Northward, that General Haldimand would not enter into any negociations with the Baron Steuben for delivering up the Western Posts, I find it proper to put a stop to all operations which are carrying on for the purpose of transporting Garrisons & Stores to them, this Fall; You will be pleased therefore to give directions for suspending all...
The chain at West-Point has already suffered considerably by the rust, and will be daily growing worse. If it is to be kept for future use, it cannot too soon be housed; and in this case it is said it may be preserved from rust by painting. If it is not necessary to keep it, the sooner it is sold the better. It would probably fetch about two thirds the price of bar iron. The chain contains...
I have been duly favoured with your Letter of the 15th covering the extract of a Letter from Lt Colo. Depeyster and the Copy of a Letter from Brigr Genl McLean. I have also just heard of the return of the Baron Steuben, without having been able to accomplish the business of his Mission. In consequence of which and of the advanced season of the Year, I have judged it impossible to take...
Having just received the inclosed Letter from the Chevalier Heintz, containing propositions to Congress respecting the admission of a Number of American Characters as Members of an Order lately instituted in Poland, together with a List of the present Knights of the Order; I think it my duty to submit the Originals in the state they came to my hands to the consideration of Congress, and to...
I beg leave to give your Excellency the trouble of perusing a state of a private concern of mine. I am sorry to be under the necessity of doing it, being conscious you have a great deal of public business of consequence on your hands; but I am emboldened by a thorough conviction that it is your Excellency’s great desire to see that justice done to every officer of your Army, which you , have...
I have the honour to inform your Excellency that the part of Colo. Jacksons who were here marched off this morning Except some so lately recover’d as to render their moving improper and a few others still sick; of the latter class none dangerously & in all as major Norton says about thirty odd—I am hastening with all possible dispatch matters here to a close. I have the honor to be Dear sir...