You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Hancock, John
  • Period

    • Revolutionary War
  • Correspondent

    • Washington, George

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 1

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Hancock, John" AND Period="Revolutionary War" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
Results 61-70 of 375 sorted by relevance
It would have afforded me the greatest pleasure, had I been able to have extended my late visit to Newport as far as Boston, but the important operations, which may be expected to the southward, made it necessary for me to return as soon as possible to the North River, that I might be more immediately in the way of receiving intelligence, and communicating any, which might be essential to the...
Colo. Palfrey having expressed a desire to settle the Accounts of his Office to this time, has obtained my permission to repair to Philadelphia and now waits on Congress with his Books & Vouchers, hoping that a Committee will be appointed to examine and adjust the same. The disadvantages which have arisen to the service and which have been severely felt for want of constant Supplies in the...
I wrote you the 4th instant by express to which I beg you will be reffered—my fears that Broughton & Sillman woud not effect any good purpose were too well founded, they are returned, & brought with them three of the principal inhabitants from the Island of St Johns. Mr Collbuck is president of the Council, acted as Governor[.] they brought the Governors Commission, the Province Seal &a &a. as...
The Inclosed came to my hands as a private Letter from Genel Sullivan—As a private Letter I lay it before Congress. The tendency (for it requires no explanation) will Acct for the contrast between it and the Letter of Genl Arnold. That the former is aiming at the Command in Canada, is obvious—whether he merits it or not is a matter to be considered; and that it may be considered with propriety...
I am particularly to acknowledge that Part of your Favour of the 10th Instt wherein you do me the Honour of determining to join the Army under my Command. I need certainly make no Professions of the Pleasure I shall have in seeing you—At the same Time I have to regret that so little is in my Power to offer equal to Col. Hancock[’s] Merits & worthy his Acceptance. I shall be happy in every Oppy...
New York, [15] May 1776 . “Since my last of the 11th Instant which I had the honour to address you, nothing of moment or importance has occurred, and the principal design of this, is to communicate to Congress the Intelligence I received last night from General Schuyler by a Letter of the 10th respecting the progress of our Troops in getting towards Canada, not doubting of their impatience and...
Since I had the honor of addressing you Yesterday, nothing of importance has occurred. In respect to the Enemy’s movements, I have obtained no other information, than that they have a number of parties patrolling up and down the River, particularly above. As yet they have not attempted to pass, nor do any of their patrols, though some are exceedingly small, meet with the least interruption...
My Aide de Camp Col. Laurens is charged with a commission of the most critical importance from Congress to the Court of Versailles. The Alliance Frigate is ordered to convey him to France, but from the exhausted state of our continental resources in every department, delays which would be fatal to the objects of his mission are to be apprehended unless the influence of yr Exy or the assistance...
The difficulty, if not impossibility, of giving Congress a just Idea of our situation and of several other important matters requiring their earliest attention by Letter, has induced me to prevail on Major General Greene to wait upon them for that purpose. This Gentleman is so much in my confidence—so intimately acquainted with my ideas—with our strength, and our weaknesses—with everything...
The Enemy advanced Yesterday with a seeming intention of attacking us upon our post near Newport. We waited for them the whole day, but they halted in the Evening at a place called Mill Town about two Miles from us. Upon reconnoitering their Situation, it appeared probable that they only meant to amuse us in front, while their real intent was to march by our Right and by suddenly passing the...