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I think I may address the subject of this letter to Your Excellency with more propriety than to any other person, as it is purely of a military nature, as you are best acquainted with my services as an officer, and as you are now engaged in assisting to form the arrangements for the future peace establishment. Your Excellency knows that in March 82, I relinquished all claim to any future...
As I flatter myself I may indulge a consciousness that my services have been of some value to the public, at least enough to merit the small compensation I wish, I will make no apology to your Excellency for conveying through you that wish to Congress. You are able to inform them if they wish information, in what degree I may have been useful, and I have intire confidence that you will do me...
I am favoured with your two letters of the 30th September. The debate on Indian Affairs which I believe is got through, and that on the residence of Congress wch. is yet in agitation has entirely thrown aside for sometime the consideration of the peace establishment. When it is resumed I will take care that your application comes into view and shall be happy if any thing in my power may...
The enclosed is a letter which I had written, and was about to dispatch at the date of it; but upon second thoughts, determined to Postpone it, and try, if from the importance of the matter, I could not bring forward the Peace Establishment, previously. I have tryed it, in vain. Congress, after resolving on the of last Month to adjourn upon the 12th. of this, did, equally unexpectedly &...
I am requested by Mr. Oudinarde to transmit you the Inclosed Account. I observed to him that it was a little extraordinary the account had not been presented before; and that it was probable your accounts with the public had been long since closed, and that, by the delay, you may have lost the opportunity of making it a public charge, as it ought to have been. But as the person was very...
Major Fairly is just setting out on a visit to You I believe on some business relating to the Cinninnati. The society of this state met some short time since and took into consideration the proposed alterations in the original frame of the Institution. Some were strenuous for adhering to the old constitution a few for adopting the new and many for a middle line. This disagreement of opinion...
I have been favoured with your letter of the 25th. of November by Major Farlie. Sincerely do I wish that the several State Societies had, or would, adopt the alterations that were recommended by the General meeting in May 1784. I then thought, and have had no cause since to change my opinion, that if the Society of the Cincinnati mean to live in peace with the rest of their fellow Citizens,...
In my passage through the Jerseys and since my arrival here I have taken particular pains to discover the public sentiment and I am more and more convinced that this is the critical opportunity for establishing the prosperity of this country on a solid foundation. I have conversed with men of information not only of this City but from different parts of the state; and they agree that there has...
I thank you for your communication of the 3d. When I refer you to the State of the Councils which prevailed at the period you left this City—and add, that they are now, if possible, in a worse train than ever; you willfind that little ground on which the hope of a good establishment can be formed. In a word, I almost dispair of seeing a favourable issue to the proceedings of the Convention,...
You probably saw some time since some animadversions on certain expressions of Governor Clinton respecting the Convention. You may have seen a piece signed a Republican, attempting to bring the fact into question and endeavouring to controvert the conclusions drawn from it, if true. My answer you will find in the inclosed. I trouble you with it merely from that anxiety which is natural to...
Your favor without date came to my hand by the last Post. It is with unfeigned concern I perceive that a political dispute has arisen between Governor Clinton and yourself. For both of you I have the highest esteem and regard. But as you say it is insinuated by some of your political adversaries, and may obtain credit, “that you palmed yourself upon me, and was dismissed from my family;” and...
I have lately made a fresh application to Congress for a final settlement of my affairs on the ground of a contract made with that honorable body previous to my joining the American army. The particulars and the evidence of that contract are stated in a printed pamphlet a copy of which Mr. Hamilton informs me he has transmitted to your Excellency. I have been just informed that Congress intend...
I am much obliged to Your Excellency for the explicit manner in which you contradict the insinuations mentioned in my last letter. The only use I shall make of your answer will be to put it into the hands of a few friends. The constitution proposed has in this state warm friends and warm enemies. The first impressions every where are in its favour; but the artillery of its opponents makes some...
I thank you for the Pamphlet, and for the Gazette contained in your letter of the 30th. Ulto. For the remaining numbers of Publius, I shall acknowledge myself obliged as I am persuaded the subject will be well handled by the Author. The new Constitution has, as the public prints will have informed you, been handed to the people of this state by an unanimous vote of the Assembly; but it is not...
Capt Cochran of the British navy has requested my aid in recovering a family watch worn by his brother, who fell at York Town, (and now in the possession of _____ _____). In compliance with his request I have written the letter herewith (to_____ _____) which I take the liberty to convey through you, in hope that if you see no impropriety in it, you would add your influence to the endeavour to...
I have had the pleasure to receive your letter dated the 13th.—accompanied by one addressed to General Morgan. I will forward the letter to Gener[a]l Morgan by the first conveyance, and add my particular wishes that he would comply with the request contained in it. Although I can scarcely imagine how the Watch of a British Officer, killed within their lines, should have fallen into his hands...
Your Excellency’s friendly and obliging letter of the 28th Ulto. came safely to hand. I thank you for your assurance of seconding my application to General Morgan. The truth of that affair is, that he purchased the watch for a trifle of a British soldier, who plundered Major Cochran at the moment of his fall at York Town. I should be deeply pained my Dear Sir if your scruples in regard to a...
In acknowledging the receipt of your candid and kind letter by the last Post; little more is incumbent upon me, than to thank you sincerely for the frankness with which you communicated your sentiments, and to assure you that the same manly tone of intercourse will always be more than barely wellcome, Indeed it, will be highly acceptable to me. I am particularly glad, in the present instance,...
A day or two ago the enclosed letters came to my hands. The watch of Genl. Morgan you have for what it cost him, what he expects for it is also signified. It is a repeater with a chaced outer case with open work in parts. The Inner case is open, nearly in the whole. It is of an old fraction make, and appears to have seen better days; perhaps its chief merits lay in being a family piece,...
The Count de Moustier affording a very favourable conveyance for Captn. Cochrans Watch, I have requested the favor of him to take charge of it—and he will deliver it to you accordingly with Mrs. Washington’s & my best wishes for you & Mrs. Hamilton I am Dr Sir Your Obedt. & affe Servt AL[S] , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. The Comte de Moustier, French Minister to the United States,...
Your two last letters have duly come to hand & the Count De Moustier has delivered me the watch you committed to his charge. Your obliging attention to this matter claims my particular acknowlegements. I will make no apology for asking you to take the additional trouble of forwarding the inclosed to the General. I take the liberty of passing it through you that you may by perusing the contents...
Mr. Hamilton will with pleasure execute the command of the President by the time appointed and have the honor of waiting upon him. AL , Photostat, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Copy: Library of Congress ⟨Philadelphia, December 9, 1783: Dr. Witherspoon, whom you know, is going to Great Britain on business and may possibly travel to France. I recommend him to your civility and attention.⟩ In the hand of GW ’s clerk Tobias Lear. There is no evidence that Witherspoon ever delivered the letter (now missing). John Witherspoon, president of the College of New Jersey, had...
24September 1784 (Washington Papers)
Having found it indispensably necessary to visit my Landed property west of the Apalacheon Mountains, and more especially that part of it which I held in Co-partnership with Mr. Gilbert Simpson —Having determined upon a tour into that Country, and having made the necessary preparations for it, I did, on the first day of this month (September) set out on my journey. Having dispatched my...
25[Diary entry: 1 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
Having found it indispensably necessary to visit my Landed property west of the Apalacheon Mountains, and more especially that part of it which I held in Co-partnership with Mr. Gilbert Simpson —Having determined upon a tour into that Country, and having made the necessary preparations for it, I did, on the first day of this month (September) set out on my journey. Having dispatched my...
26[Diary entry: 2 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
Sep. 2. About 5 Oclock we set out from Shepperds; and leaving the Baggage to follow slowly on, we arrived about 11 Oclock ourselves at Leesburgh, where we Dined. The Baggage having joined we proceeded to Mr. Israel Thompsons & lodged makg. abt. 36 M. Dinner was at Thomas Roper’s ordinary (Cash Memoranda, DLC:GW ). Israel Thompson (d. 1795), a Quaker, lived on a 700–acre plantation in the...
27[Diary entry: 3 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
3d. Having business to transact with my Tenants in Berkeley; & others, who were directed to meet me at my Brother’s (Colo. Charles Washington’s), I left Doctr. Craik and the Baggage to follow slowly, and set out myself about Sun rise for that place—where after Breakfasting at Keys’s ferry I arrived about 11 Oclock—distant abt. 17 Miles. Colo. Warner Washington, Mr. Wormeley, Genl. Morgan, Mr....
28[Diary entry: 4 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
4th. Having finished my business with my Tenants (so far at least as partial payments could put a close to it) and provided a waggon for the transportation of my Baggage to the Warm springs (or Town of Bath) to give relief to my Horses, which from the extreme heat of the weather began to rub & gaul, I set out after dinner, and reached Captn. Stroads a Substantial farmers betwn. Opeckon Creek &...
29[Diary entry: 5 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
5th. Dispatched my Waggon (with the Baggage) at day light; and at 7 Oclock followed it. Bated at one Snodgrasses, on Back Creek and dined there; About 5 Oclock P.M. we arrived at the Springs, or Town of Bath—after travelling the whole day through a drizling rain, 30 Miles. Robert Snodgrass ran the tavern which his father, William Snodgrass, an emigrant from Scotland, had built on Back Creek...
30[Diary entry: 6 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
6th. Remained at Bath all day and was shewed the Model of a Boat constructed by the ingenious Mr. Rumsey, for ascending rapid currents by mechanism; the principles of this were not only shewn, & fully explained to me, but to my very great satisfaction, exhibited in practice in private, under the injunction of Secresy, untill he saw the effect of an application he was about to make to the...
31[Diary entry: 8 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
8th. Set out about 7 oclock with the Doctr. (Craik) his Son William, and my Nephew Bushrod Washington; who were to make the tour with us. About ten I parted with them at 15 Miles Creek, & recrossed the Potomack (having passed it abt. 3 Miles from the Springs before) to a tract of mine on the Virginia side which I find exceedingly rich, & must be very valuable. The lower end of the Land is rich...
32[Diary entry: 9 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
9th. Having discharged the hired Horses which were obtained at the Springs, & hired one more only to supply the place of one of mine, whose back was much hurt, we had them loaded by Six oclock, and was about to set out when it began to rain; which looking very likely to continue thro’ the day, I had the Loads taken of to await the issue. At this place I met with a Man who lives at the Mouth of...
33[Diary entry: 10 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
10th. Set off a little after 5 Oclock altho’ the morning was very unpromissing. Finding from the rains that had fallen, and description of the Roads, part of which between the old Town & this place (old Fort Cumberland) we had passed, that the progress of my Baggage would be tedeous, I resolved (it being Necessary) to leave it to follow; and proceed on myself to Gilbert Simpson’s, to prepare...
34[Diary entry: 11 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
11th. Set out at half after 5 oclock from Tumbersons, & in about 1½ Miles came to what is called the little crossing of Yohiogany—the road not bad. This is a pretty considerable water and, as it is said to have no fall in it, may, I conceive, be improved into a valuable navigation; and from every Acct. I have yet been able to obtain, communicates nearest with the No. Branch of Potomack of any...
35[Diary entry: 12 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
12th. Left Daughertys about 6 Oclock, stopped a while at the Great Meadows, and viewed a tenament I have there, which appears to have been but little improved, tho capable of being turned to great advantage, as the whole of the ground called the Meadows may be reclaimed at an easy comparitive expence & is a very good stand for a Tavern. Much Hay may be cut here when the ground is laid down in...
36[Diary entry: 13 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
13th. I visited my Mill, and the several tenements on this Tract (on which Simpson lives). I do not find the Land in general equal to my expectation of it. Some part indeed is as rich as can be, some other part is but indifferent—the levellest is the coldest, and of the meanest quality—that which is most broken, is the richest; tho’ some of the hills are not of the first quality. The...
37[Diary entry: 14 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
14th. Remained at Mr. Gilbert Simpsons all day. Before Noon Colo. Willm. Butler and the Officer Commanding the Garrison at Fort Pitt, a Captn. Lucket came here. As they confirmed the reports of the discontented temper of the Indians and the Mischiefs done by some parties of them and the former advised me not to prosecute my intended trip to the Great Kanhawa, I resolved to decline it. This day...
38[Diary entry: 15 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
15th. This being the day appointed for the Sale of my moiety of the Co-partnership stock—Many People were gathered (more out of curiosity I believe than from other motives) but no great Sale made. My Mill I could obtain no bid for, altho I offered an exemption from the payment of Rent 15 Months. The Plantation on which Mr. Simpson lives rented well—Viz. for 500 Bushels of Wheat payable at any...
39[Diary entry: 16 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
16th. Continued at Simpsons all day—in order to finish the business which was begun yesterday. Gave leases to some of my Ten[an]ts on the Land whereon I now am. GW’s tract at Washington’s Bottom contained, besides Simpson’s 600–acre plantation and the mill tract, five small farms leased to tenants whose names and length of tenure are not fully clear ( Thomas Freeman to GW, 18 Dec. 1786 ,...
40[Diary entry: 17 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
17th. Detained here by a settled Rain the whole day—which gave me time to close my accts. with Gilbert Simpson, & put a final end to my Partnership with him. Agreed this day with a Major Thomas Freeman to superintend my business over the Mountains, upon terms to be inserted in his Instructions. “I do not expect,” GW had written Simpson 10 July 1784 , “to be compensated for my losses, nor mean...
41[Diary entry: 18 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
18th. Set out with Doctr. Craik for my Land on Millers run (a branch of Shurtees [Chartier’s] Creek). Crossed the Monongahela at Deboirs Ferry—16 Miles from Simpsons —bated at one Hamiltons about 4 Miles from it, in Washington County, and lodged at a Colo. Cannons on the Waters of Shurtees Creek—a kind hospitable Man; & sensible. Most of the Land over which we passed was hilly—some of it very...
42[Diary entry: 19 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
19th. Being Sunday, and the People living on my Land, apparently very religious, it was thought best to postpone going among them till tomorrow —but rode to a Doctr. Johnsons who had the Keeping of Colo. Crawfords (Surveying) records—but not finding him at home was disappointed in the business which carried me there. These settlers were members of the Associate Presbyterian Church, commonly...
43[Diary entry: 20 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
20th. Went early this Morning to view my Land, & to receive the final determination of those who live upon it. Having obtained a Pilot near the Land I went first to the plantation of Samuel McBride, who has about 5 Acres of Meadow & 30 of arable Land under good fencing—a Logged dwelling house with a punchion roof, & stable, or small barn, of the same kind—the Land rather hilly, but good,...
44[Diary entry: 21 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
21st. Accompanied by Colo. Cannon & Captn. Swearingin who attended me to Debores ferry on the Monongahela which seperates the Counties of Fayette & Washington, I returned to Gilbert Simpson’s in the Afternoon; after dining at one Wickermans Mill near the Monongahela. Colo. Cannon, Captn. Sweringin & Captn. Richie all promised to hunt up the Evidences which could prove my possession &...
45[Diary entry: 22 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
22d. After giving instructions to Major Thomas Freeman respecting his conduct in my business, and disposing of my Baggage which was left under the care of Mr. Gilbert Simpson—consisting of two leather & one linnen Valeses with my Marquee & horseman’s Tent Tent Poles & Pins—all my bedding except Sheets (which I take home with me)—the equipage Trunk containing all that was put into it except the...
46[Diary entry: 23 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
23d. Arrived at Colo. Philips abt. five oclock in the afternoon 16 Miles from Beason Town & near the Mouth of Cheat Rivr. The land thro’ wch. I rid was for the most part tolerably level—in some places rich—but in general of a second quality. Crossed no water of consequence except Georges Creek. An Apology made to me from the Court of Fayette (thro’ Mr. Smith) for not addressing me; as they...
47[Diary entry: 24 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
24th. And crossed it at the Mouth, as it was thought the river was too much swelled to attempt the ford a little higher up. The fork was about 2 Miles & half from Colo. Philups, & the ground betwn. very hilly tho’ rich in places. The Cheat at the Mouth is about 125 yds. wide—the Monongahela near dble. that. The colour of the two Waters is very differt., that of Cheat is dark (occasioned as is...
48[Diary entry: 25 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
25th. Having obtained the foregoing information, and being indeed some what discouraged from the acct. given of the passage of the Cheat river through the Laurel hill and also from attempting to return by the way of the Dunkers bottom, as the path it is said is very blind, & exceedingly grown up with briers, I resolved to try the other rout, along the New road to Sandy Creek; & thence by...
49[Diary entry: 26 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
26th. Having found our Horses readily (for they nevr. lost sight of our fire) we started at the dawning of day, and passing along a small path much enclosed with weeds and bushes, loaded with water from the overnights rain, & the showers which were continually falling, we had an uncomfortable travel to one Charles friends, about 10 Miles; where we could get nothing for our horses, and only...
50[Diary entry: 27 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
27th. I left Mr. Logston’s a little after day-break. At 4 Miles thro’ bad road, occasioned by Stone, I crossed the Stony River; which, as hath been before observed, appears larger than the No. Branch. At ten Miles I had by an imperceptible rise, gained the summit of the Alligany Mountain and began to desend it where it is very steep and bad to the waters of Pattersons Creek which embraces...