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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Period="Confederation Period" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
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I have received your letter of the 23d Inst. and am in hopes that the Buckwheat will arrive in season. I will thank you to send me, by the first post after this reaches you, fourteen yards of Livery lace agreeably to the enclosed pattern; and let it be directed to me, or, in my absence, to Major George Augne Washington at this place. With great regard, I am, Dear Sir, Yr most Obedt Hble Servt...
I have been favored with your Letter of the 19th by which it appears that a quoram of Congress was hardly to be expected until the beginning of the past week. As this delay must be very irksome to the attending members, and every days continuance of it (before the Government is in operation) will be more sensibly felt, I am resolved, no interruption shall proceed from me that can well be...
I have been favored with your Letter of the 19th.; by which it appears that a quoram of Congress was hardly to be expected until the beginning of the past week. As this delay must be very irksome to the attending Members, and every days continuance of it (before the Government is in operation) will be more sensibly felt; I am resolved, no interruption shall proceed from me that can well be...
Your favor of the 22d has been handed to me, and I beg you to accept my thanks for the prompt and decisive measure you have taken with respect to the Proclamation Warrant—and other matters relative to my Land in Charles County. I have no particular derection to give concerning the first except to proceed safely but not precipitately, as the latter though it may not involve greater expence than...
I have reasons for wishing that the enclosed letter could be conveyed with safety and expedition; but no opportunity offering from these parts, I take the liberty of committing it to your care on a supposition that the intercours⟨e⟩ between Richmond & the Western District will soon furnish one. With very great esteem & regard I am—Dear Sir Yr Most Obedt Hble Servt ALS , University of Glasgow,...
I have duly received your letter dated the 12th of February—If I was greatly alarmed at the nature of the transactions mentioned in it, I was not less obliged to you for communicating so clear an account of them. It is true I had previously received some verbal and written informations on the subject of a similar tenor; but none which placed the affair in such an alarming point of view, as...
The enclosed letters will shew you the reason of my not having written to you sooner upon the subject of the Land which you offered me. If the valuation mentioned by Colonel Lewis is agreeable to you I will take it at that; but if you think the price too low I am willing to wait for the payment of the debt due from your fathers Estate until you can discharge it by some other means more...
With very great sensibility I have recd the honor of your letter dated the 10th instt and consider the kind & obliging invitation to your House until suitable accomodations can be provided for the President as a testimony of your friendship & politeness; for which I shall ever retain a grateful sense—But if it should be my lot (for heaven knows it is not my wish) to appear again in a public...
Permit me, in one line, to acknowledge the receipt of your polite and obliging favors of the 9th 12th & 16th instt and to thank you for the information they contain. Public affairs seem to be in an awkward interregnum—and among other irksome circumstances, can not be quite congenial with the feelings of the attending members of the New Congress. My best wishes, in which Mrs Washington unites,...
Your letters of the 18th to your Aunt and myself, found me at this place—where it is not likely I shall remain much longer. It is not very probable, as I shall want to be well fixed at New York before I send for your Aunt—and the same Horses will have to carry us both there—that she will be able to commence her journey, for that place before the first of May. But in this, as in every dependent...
Your Coachman applied to me yesterday (through my Nephew) for employment. I informed him it was not my custom to treat with any one in the service of another unless it was well ascertained that a seperation was about to take place—nor then unless sufficient testimonials could be produced of sobriety—of Skill honesty and industry in the occupation that was followed. To the First, he replied...
As it is probable I shall soon be under the necessity of quitting this place, and entering once more into the bustle of publick life, in conformity to the voice of my Country, and the earnest entreaties of my friends, however contrary it is to my own desires or inclinations; I think it incumbent on me as, your Uncle & friend, to give you some advisory hints, which, if properly attended to,...
I have received your letter of the 29th of January enclosing a statement of the Rents paid by the tenants occupying my Land which is under your care —The price of flour in your neighbourhood (which I am informed by Majr McCormack is 25/Virginia currency per bbl) will make me some amends for receiving the Rents in wheat instead of Cash which could not be obtained from the tenants for the rate...
Your favors of the 5th & 8th came duly to hand; the first from Baltimore, the latter from Philda. The design of this is merely to acknowledge the receipt of them, and to forward the enclosed; but I will add, as I have my pen in my hand, that Col. Bland, after having lain a weak with the Gent. at Gunston, after having been shipwrecked & land-wrecked, mired, fatigued with walking, &C. &C....
Your favors of the 5th. & 8th. came duly to hand; the first from Baltimore, the latter from Philda. The design of this is merely to acknowledge the receipt of them, and to forward the enclosed; but I will add, as I have my pen in my hand, that Col. Bland, after having lain a week with the Gent at Gunston, after having been shipwrecked & land-wrecked, mired, fatigued with walking, &c. &c....
I am much obliged to you for the trouble you was so good as to take in forwarding to me the report of the Committee of Council at Quebec to Lord Dorchester. The paper contains many things of importance, and, although I do not doubt in the least its authenticity; yet, if there should not appear to be any thing indiscreet in the request, I should be glad to be more particularly ascertained of...
I was yesterday favored with the receipt of your letter of the 10th instant, through the medium of my Nephew to whom it had been committed: and I must be dispensed with for only giving the general reply, which I have lately found it necessary to give on several similar occasions. For since it has been expected that I should be called to the chair of government, many applications have been made...
The letter which you was pleased to address to me, on the 16th of this month, has been duly received; & in the acknowlegment thereof, I find myself at liberty only to make a few observations on the general subject of appointments to offices under the new government. Should it inevitably prove my lot to hold the Chief Magistracy, I have determined to go into the office, without being under any...
Upon taking up my pen to express my sensibility for the flattering sentiments you are still pleased to entertain of me, I found my advocations would only permit me to blend the demonstration of that grateful feeling with an acknowledgement of the receipt of your polite letter and elegant poem. Be pleased then to accept my thanks for them. The joint good wishes of Mrs Washington and myself for...
I have just now been favored with the receipt of your letter, dated the 10th of Octor last; and would not delay to make my acknowledgments by the earliest opportunity. While I appreciate with gratitude the favorable sentiments you are pleased to express for me; I flatter myself, in the communication of the following ideas which have occurred on the subject of your letter, you will be persuaded...
This letter will be handed to you by Mr Dunnington (my tenant in Charles City) who can, more fully than I, explain to you the nature and circumstances of some disputes in which the land he lives on is involved. To enable him to do it more clearly I enclose you a plot of the Land. Two matters it seems will call for your attention—namely to dispossess one Perry of part of my property which he...
In receiving you cannot feel more pain than I do by communicating the following information; but as necessity, it is said, has no law, we both must submit to it. It is now several years since I have been looking for payment of the debt which is due to me from the estate of your decescased deceseased father John Mercer Esquire —I have been promised it is true considerable sums from time to time...
I have taken the liberty to enclose a protested bill of Exchange drawn in 1765 by the Exts. of William Armsted Esqr. in my favor—which I will thank you to take the necessary steps to recover; and as a compensation for your trouble therewith I will allow you ten per Cent upon whatever you may obtain of the debt—The letters &c. whh accompany the bill will serve to shew that the matter has not...
I have now before me your letters of the 16th Ulto & the 5th & 8th Inst. Mrs Washington’s Slippers and Clogs have come safe to hand, the latter, however, are not such as she wished to have—she intended to have had leathern Gloshoes made, and will, by the first convenient opportunity, return the Clogs to Mr Palmer and get a pair of Gloshoes. I am very sorry that you did not get the quantity of...
I wrote to you on the 28th of January, according to the terms upon which you proposed to procure a quantity of Clover seed for me—and have laterly becom very impatient for its arrival—A disappointment in obtaining the Seed seasonably would lay me under an unspeakable disadvantage—much greater than the total loss of the seed would do—for I shall not only be deprived of the benefit which might...
Since you were speaking to me concerning your Son Bob, I have thought it probable that I may have occasion for a young person in my family of a good disposition, who writes a good hand, and who can confine himself a certain reasonable number of hours in the 24 to the recording of letters in books, which will be provided for their reception from the separate papers on which they now are, and...
Your letter of this date, was put into my hands on my return from a ride at the moment dinner was waiting; for wch reason I have only time to express—in a single word—my love & thanks for the sentiments contained in it; and to assure you, that my best wishes, in which Mrs Washington unites, are presented to Mrs Lee; and that with sincere regard and affection I am ever Yours P.S. If we have any...
Your good humour of the 3rd, which made me laugh heartily, has fairly driven me out of the field, not, indeed, into the Potowmac, but into a resolution not to strain my wits in making one word of reply, except in sober earnest. This preliminary being settled—I will tell you all I have to say, in three words: though one might perhaps suffice, for you know they say “a word to the wise is...
Your Letters of the 16th and 25th Ullto are before me. The draft upon Mr Wales for £20 enclosed in the former was duly discharged by him. The order for one hundred barriels of flour enclosed in the letter is herewith returned—Altho’ the Cash, as any thing that could produce it, would be very acceptable to me at present, yet I am not so much in want of it as to sink 20 per Cent to obtain...
I was favored last evening by yours of the 20th Ulto and am glad to be confirmed in the idea that a spirit of unanimity is becoming still more prevalent. My having company with me at present & my being occupied with my private concerns, will be considered by you as sufficient reasons for my writing in a laconic manner. I will therefore reply to the principal scope of your letter with all that...
My friendship is not in the least lessened by the difference which has taken place in our political sentiments; nor is my regard for you diminished by the part you have acted. Men’s minds are as varient as their faces, and, where the motives to their actions are pure, the operation of the former is no more to be imputed to them as a crime, than the appearance of the latter: for both being the...
I am much obliged by your assurance of Money—Mr Lear waits upon for it, and carry’s a Bond, drawn in the manner you requested. I am very well satisfied to allow 6 per Cent (the Interest of Maryland) because I have not the smallest doubt of the readiness with which you could lend any sum on those terms. If it is necessary that the Bond should be taken in Maryland I will exchange the one now...
I have duly received your letter of the 23d of last Month; and thank you for the information contained in it. I think with you that the subject is of great moment; and hope such measures may be adopted, respecting the Western Country, as will prevent the United States from receiving any detriment. I am with sentiments of great regard Dr Sir Your most Obedt & Hble Sert LB , DLC:GW . John Dawson...
I take the earliest occasion to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, dated the 23d of Feby; in order to shew how desirous I am of acting a candid part in respect to the application contained in it. Should it become absolutely necessary for me to occupy the situation, in which your letter pre-supposes me, I have determined to go into it, perfectly free from all engagements, of every nature...
Never ’till within these two yrs have I experienced the want of money. Short Crops, & other causes not entirely within my Controul, make me feel it now, very sensibly. To collect money without the intervention of Suits (and those are tedious) seems impracticable. And Land, which I have offered for Sale, will not command cash but at an under value. Under this statement I am inclined to do what...
I have received your Letter of the 18th of Octr 1788 informing me of your having shipped a box of plants for me by desire of Sir Edward Newenham & Colo. Persse. The Box has arrived at Baltimore, and, I am informed, the plants are in good order; but the severity of the season has closed our Rivers and prevented their being sent round. You will please, Sir, to accept my thanks for your attention...
I have received your letter of the 12th Ulto enclosing your Account with me—The Balance of £12.9.4½ due to you, I shall direct to be paid as soon as I can make it convenient—The reason of its not having been discharged before must be owing to the order being involved (in my books) with the Account of Colonel Mercers Estate from whence the wheat was brought and of course not coming so...
Your letter of the 16t Ulto came duly to hand and I must beg you to accept of my thanks for your polite attention to the little commission which you was so good as to offer to execute for me. I am very glad that the Goosberry slips are in so good a condition, and hope they will arrive here without any injury. You will be so kind as to thank Captn Dyer, in my name, for his attention to the...
The letter which you addressed to me, on the 18th of last month, has come to hand; and requires that I should write to you a few words on the subject of it. Previous to the receipt of your letter, I had been apprised of your desires by Colo. Humphreys, and made acquainted with the favorable opinion of your services, entertained by the several public Characters from America in Europe. You will...
I have been favored by the receipt of your obliging letter, dated the 18th of Deer last, just in time to send my acknowledgment by a person, who is immediately returning to Kentucky. This circumstance prevents me from expressing, so fully as I might otherwise have done, the sense I have of the very patriotic sentiments you entertain respecting the important matter, which is the subject of your...
I beg you to accept my acknowledgment of and thanks for your obliging favors of the 12th 16th & 19th of last month, and particularly for the trouble you have had in procuring and forwarding for me a suit of the Hartford Manufacture. It is come safe, and exceeds my expectation. I will take an early opportunity of paying the cost of it. The result of the late Elections will not only soon be...
I am taking up my pen to present my acknowledgment for your letter of the 10th of Octobr last; and wish I had any thing to communicate in return, which might make mine equally acceptable to you. Notwithstanding my various endeavours to procure the articles I was desirous of transmitting to you, I have only been able to succeed in obtaining a couple of opossums, of the different sexes. I have...
Your polite letter, dated the 11th of October last, has been duly received; & merits my particular acknowledgment. I have also to thank you very sincerely for the Gooseberry plants, which have arrived at Baltimore, from whence I have not yet been able to obtain them on account of the ice in our river. I shall have your directions as to the mode of culture particularly observed, and hope the...
The late Colo. Thomas Colvell, in his will appointed his Widow, your Brother and myself his Executors. Some persons in Britain, who consider themselves, under a Clause in the Will, as residuary Legatees, have been very importunate to have the resedue of that Estate remitted them, and some of the applications have been made in a very rude manner; this together with the necessity of making a...
In a letter which, I had the pleasure of addressing to you lately, I mentioned my private business and numerous avocations as an apology for the concisness and irregularity that might be observable in my correspondence. I shall therefore be excused for only acknowledging the receipt of your favor dated the 28th of Octr last, and thanking you for the Maps enclosed in it. Not having been able to...
I received by the last Mail your letter dated the 15th of this month, accompanied with your printed observations on the new Constitution, and am much obliged by this token of your polite attention. However I may differ with you in sentiment on some of the points, which are advocated in your Treatise; I am pleased in discovering so much candour and liberality as seem to predominate in your...
I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 4th September 1788 which was handed to me by your friend Captn Zellickoffer—to whom I fully delivered my sentiments upon the purport of your letter, and who will undoubtedly take every necessary step towards your legal or honorary admission into the Society of the Cincinnati. It is not in my power to say anything decidedly upon the propriety...
I have the honor to enclose a letter from Monsr Cottineau de Kerloquin requesting an admission into the Society of the Cincinnati—and one from the Chevalier D’Anmours setting forth the services of that Gentleman and his pretensions to admission. Both of which I must beg you to lay before the Society at their next General Meeting that they may take the necessary steps thereon; unless it shall...
Letter not found: to Battaile Muse, 21 Feb. 1789. On 12 Mar. GW wrote to Muse : “I wrote to you on the 21st Ulto.”
The letter which you did me the honor of writing to me on the 11th came to my hands at George Town the 16th at a time when it was not in my power to give it an answer: but my sentiments on the purport of it were fully delivered to Captn Zollickoffer to whom I beg leave to refer you. Briefly they were—that Major Cottinear de Kerloguin was either a member, of right of the Society of the...