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  • Author

    • Washington, George
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    • Washington, George Augustine
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    • Confederation Period
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    • Washington, George

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Washington, George Augustine" AND Period="Confederation Period" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
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Having given very full & ample details of the intended crops—and my ideas of the modes of managing them at the several Plantations, little, if these are observed, need be added on this subject. But as the profit of every Farm is greater, or less in proportion to the quantity of manure which is made thereon, or can be obtained; and by keeping the fields in good condition. These two important...
This, in acknowledgment of your letter of the 2d of this Month, is probably the last letter I shall write you from this place; as the probability is, that the Convention will have compleated the business which brought the delegates together, in the course of this Week. God grant I may not be disappointed in this expectation, as I am quite homesick. As Mr McPhearson’s glass (if good) is cheaper...
Your last letter of the 27th ulto came in due course of Post, and gave me the pleasure to hear that you had had a continuance of rain. Seasonable weather may bring on young Corn, & help that which was not too far gone. At any rate the Buck Wheat, and vegitables of every kind, must receive benefit. When I expressed a wish to have the race widened from the mill upwards, it was on a supposition...
Not having received any letter from you last Week (by the Post which arrives here on Thursdays) I have, of course, nothing to reply to; but request to be informed of the depth of the Well (by the Kitchen door) from the level of the Brick pavement, which surrds it, to the surface of the Water within; and the depth of the Water. To be clear, if I am not so already, I want the whole depth from...
This letter is in acknowledgement of yours of the 5th Instt —and painful indeed it is to find that the drought should continue with such unremitting violence with you, when from other parts (and indeed in your own Neighbourhd) by acct, it is seasonable; and is as much so here as could be wished. By the Dolphin, Captn Steward, I have sent some Goods, and other articles round; which I hope will...
Your letter of the 22d is before me. If the outer doors of the New room are adapted to receive Mortice locks, it will make the room more uniform; and I can get them here of good quality from Seven Inches downwards—I shall decline sending any kind ’till I hear from you again thinking it best that the whole should be of this kind if any are. Perceiving you have little chance of sowing much Wheat...
For the benefit of exercise, I left the City at 5 Oclock on Sunday Morning, and did not return in time to write by the Post on Monday. I now acknowledge the receipt of your letter and report of the 15th & shall observe upon such parts of them as may require it. I would not wish you to ask Mr Lund Washington for Dows Bond—but when you see him you may tell him that I had directed you (if it was...
Your letter and report came to hand in the ordinary course of the Post. I do not recollect how I expressed myself with respect to the painting of the New room, that is whether, when speaking of this business, you would understand that it was to be done by a proper, & good painter. This was my meaning; and therefore, having no high opinion of the skill, though a favourable one of the Industry,...
I have your letter of the first before me. In a late one, you have said, that application had been made to Dow, without effect, for the amount of his Bond; and therefore, Flour was sold for the use of Mr L. Washington. Does the latter mean to receive the proceeds of the flour & keep the Bond (for it was put into his hands) too? If he does not, and the Bond is returned to you; I wish Mr Lear or...
Your letter of the 24th, with the report, is before me; & such observations as occur, shall be handed to you. In plowing the drilled Corn, it is to be remembered, that throwing the furrow always to the plant, will leave the land in high ridges; and make it more liable to wash, & run into Gullies; to avoid wch, was one of my principal motives for introducing the Hoe & common Iron toothed...