You
have
selected

  • Correspondent

    • Washington, George
    • Young, Arthur

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 2

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 2

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Washington, George" AND Correspondent="Young, Arthur"
Results 1-10 of 25 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Your letter of the 2d of June, with the second edition of your travels; and two sets of the 19th 20th and 21st vols. of your Annals (one set of which I shall send to the Agricultural Society of this City) came to my hands a few days ago only. The letter alluded to therein, as being sent by some farmers—whom you had the goodness to recommend to me, has not yet been received; nor had I, before,...
I should have done myself the honour of answering Your Excellency’s letter more fully than was in my power by the farmers I recommended to you, long since, but I waited to be able to transmit the second edition with large additions of my Travels. I now have that pleasure, & shall be happy if the book is honoured with a place in your library. The doubts you were pleased to express as to the...
I wrote to you three months ago, or more, by my late secretary and friend, Mr Lear; but as his departure from this Country for Great Britain, was delayed longer than he or I expected, it is at least probable that that letter will not have reached your hands at a much earlier period than the one I am now writing. At the time it was written, the thoughts which I am now about to disclose to you...
Instead of commencing this letter with an apology for suffering your favor of the 17th of last Jany to remain so long unacknowledged, I will refer you to the bearer, who is perfectly acquainted with my situation, for the reason why it has done so. The bearer Sir, is Mr Lear, a gentleman who has been a member of my family seven years; and, until the present moment, my Secretary—consequently...
At the request of several Gentlemen of my particular acquaintance in this City, I have taken the liberty of putting this letter into the hands of Dr Edwards, as an introduction of that Gent[l]eman to you. I am informed that Dr Edwards has two objects in view by going to Europe—the establishment of his health—and a desire of obtaining a knowledge of the agriculture of that part of the world. In...
Having had occasion in some late communications to you, to speak of the District which has been decided on (under a law of Congress) for the permanent seat of the government of the United States; I do myself the pleasure of sending you a plan of the intended City, which is now laying out in the centre thereof. It will serve to shew you, and such as may have the curiosity to look at it, that...
I am to acknowledge the rect of three of Your Excellencys letters which contain information so truly valuable and important that I know not how to use expressions adequate to the occasion of thanking you for so great a condescention in gratifying the curiosity, however useful a curiosity of an individual with no greater claims than myself. Your information has thrown me affloat upon the High...
Extract of a Letter From Arthur Young Esquire To The President of the US. dated 17. Jan. 1793. “Your information has thrown me affloat on the high-Seas. To analyse your Husbandry has the difficulty of a problem. I cannot understand it, and the more I know of it, the more surprising it appears. Is it possible that the Inhabitants of a great Continent not new settlers, who of course live only to...
I must begin this letter with an apology—no apology ought to be so satisfactory as the truth—and the truth is—that not receiving the account of the taxes of a Virginia Estate for which I had written (before I left this City during the recess of Congress) as mentioned in my letter to you of the 18th of June, the promise I then made of forwarding it to you in my next, had escaped me altogether,...
I must beg your acceptance of my best thanks for the book that accompanied your polite letter of the 9th of June which came duly to my hands. I presume you have long before this received my letter which was committed to the care of Mr Pinckney, our Minister at the Court of Great Britain, and shall be very glad if the contents of it afforded you the information which it was intended to...