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    • Washington, George
    • Powel, Elizabeth Willing

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Washington, George" AND Correspondent="Powel, Elizabeth Willing"
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Receive, I pray you, my best thanks for the Prints you had the goodness to send me; and my acknowledgments of your kind, and obliging offer to chuse some thing handsome, with which to present Miss Custis. The difference between thirty & Sixty (or more) dollars, is not so much a matter of consideration, as the appropriate thing. I presume, she is provided with a Muff; of a tippet I am not so...
The amount of the Articles purchased you will find to be Seventy Four dols. & a half. I must request the Favour of you to deliver the enclosed Letter to Mrs Law. My Heart is so sincerely afflicted and my Idea’s so confused that I can only express my predominant Wish—that God may take you into his holy keeping and preserve you safe both in Traveling and under all Circumstances, and that you may...
The articles you had the goodness to send me this forenoon (when it was not in my power to acknowledge the receipt of them) came very safe, and I pray you again, to accept my thanks for the trouble I have given you in this business. Enclosed are Seventy five dollars, which is the nearest my present means will enable me to approach $74 50/100 the cost of them. Your letter to Mrs Law shall be...
I feel much obliged by your kind & polite invitation to dine with you to day, but am under the necessity of denying myself that pleasure. I had, previously to the receipt of your Card, resolved not to dine out of my lodgings while business should detain me in the City: and, in consequence, had declined Invitations from Mr Liston, and the Chevr de Freire. But a more conclusive reason than this,...
I now beg leave to inform you that I will give One Thousand Dollars for your Horses on the Delivery of them, provided I understood you clearly on Saturday Evening—that they are only Ten & Eleven Years old—that they are perfectly sound—well broke, and gentle—will drive with a Postillion or in Hand as may be most convenient; for tho they are not for my own Use, yet it is most probable that I...
With Pleasure should I accede to your Proposal respecting your Coach, was I to be the possessor of the Horses; but when I assure you that they are for my Nephew you will see the Necessity of the Union being dissolved between them and their espoused Coach. I have deferred answering you Sir until I had an Opportunity of sounding him on the Subject, without directly telling him it was for Sale;...
Feeling myself incapable of nourishing an implacable Rresentment; and in conformity with your better and dispassionate Judgment I have after maturely considering all that passed Yesterday, determined to dine with you Tomorrow, when I will endeavor to meet your Ideas with Fortitude. With Sentiments of Respect & Affection I am Sir Your sincere Friend DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Gen Washington (this instant returning from a Committee & finding Mrs Powell’s Card) begs leave to present his respectful Compliments, and to inform her, that he will, if it is convenient & agreeable to her, have the honor to accompany her to Mr Bingham’s in the Afternoon of tomorrow. ViMtvL .
My Friendship for you induces me to transmit a Pamphlet that is now in Circulation in this City, & probably, may not have come to your Hands. I believe it meets with universal Approbation from all the disinterested sensible & considerate, as it is replete with good Sense & the Arguments are generally conclusive. It is possible you may not have yet taken a decided Part, & indeed the Author...