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    • Washington, George
    • Powel, Elizabeth Willing

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Washington, George" AND Correspondent="Powel, Elizabeth Willing"
Results 11-20 of 29 sorted by author
I now beg leave to inform you that I will give One Thousand Dollars for your Horses on the Delivery of them, provided I understood you clearly on Saturday Evening—that they are only Ten & Eleven Years old—that they are perfectly sound—well broke, and gentle—will drive with a Postillion or in Hand as may be most convenient; for tho they are not for my own Use, yet it is most probable that I...
The Speaker of the Senate of Pennsylvania will have the Honor to wait on the President of the United States and Mrs Washington on Thursday next. Mrs Powel has the Pleasure to present her respectfull Compliments to them and to express her Regrets that she cannot have the Honor of dining with them upon that Day. L , ViMtvL . Samuel Powel served as Speaker of the Pennsylvania senate from 1792...
With Pleasure should I accede to your Proposal respecting your Coach, was I to be the possessor of the Horses; but when I assure you that they are for my Nephew you will see the Necessity of the Union being dissolved between them and their espoused Coach. I have deferred answering you Sir until I had an Opportunity of sounding him on the Subject, without directly telling him it was for Sale;...
The President’s best respects and thanks to Mrs Powell, for the perusal of the Pamphlets herewith, accompany their return. AL , ViMtvL . The pamphlets have not been identified.
The articles you had the goodness to send me this forenoon (when it was not in my power to acknowledge the receipt of them) came very safe, and I pray you again, to accept my thanks for the trouble I have given you in this business. Enclosed are Seventy five dollars, which is the nearest my present means will enable me to approach $74 50/100 the cost of them. Your letter to Mrs Law shall be...
Gen Washington (this instant returning from a Committee & finding Mrs Powell’s Card) begs leave to present his respectful Compliments, and to inform her, that he will, if it is convenient & agreeable to her, have the honor to accompany her to Mr Bingham’s in the Afternoon of tomorrow. ViMtvL .
A Mail of last week brought me the honor of your favor, begun the 11th, and ended the 13th of this instant. Had it not been for one circumstance, which by the bye is a pretty material one—viz.—that I had no love letters to lose—the introductory without the explanatory part of your letter, would have caused a serious alarm; and might have tried how far my nerves were able to sustain the shock...
My Coach horses, having performed (faithfully & well) all the duties I have required of them, they are sent to you, agreeably to my promise; hoping they will be as serviceable to whomsoever they are committed, as they have been to me; and it is my wish that they may meet with a continuance of their former kind usage. As every moment of our time while we remain in this City, will be closely...
The enclosed thoughts are well conceived. The sentiments are just; and altho’ the envy expressed in some of them is to be regretted, yet it is hoped that Mira, at the age of four score, will stand as much in the way of Cloe as she does at present; and will appear the Same in the eyes of all who may then see her, as she did on her anniversary of fifty. AL , ViMtvL . The enclosed poem reads:...
General Washington presents his best wishes, and affectionate compliments to Mrs Powell. If Mrs Powell is not otherwise engaged, G.W. will have the pleasure of breakfasting with her tomorrow, at her usual hour, if named to him. AL , ViMtvL . See GW to Elizabeth Willing Powel, 17 Nov., n.2 .