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    • Powel, Elizabeth Willing
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    • Washington, George
    • Powel, Elizabeth Willing

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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Powel, Elizabeth Willing" AND Correspondent="Washington, George" AND Correspondent="Powel, Elizabeth Willing"
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The President’s best respects and thanks to Mrs Powell, for the perusal of the Pamphlets herewith, accompany their return. AL , ViMtvL . The pamphlets have not been identified.
Gen Washington (this instant returning from a Committee & finding Mrs Powell’s Card) begs leave to present his respectful Compliments, and to inform her, that he will, if it is convenient & agreeable to her, have the honor to accompany her to Mr Bingham’s in the Afternoon of tomorrow. ViMtvL .
General Washington presents his best wishes, and affectionate compliments to Mrs Powell. If Mrs Powell is not otherwise engaged, G.W. will have the pleasure of breakfasting with her tomorrow, at her usual hour, if named to him. AL , ViMtvL . See GW to Elizabeth Willing Powel, 17 Nov., n.2 .
The President and Mrs Washington offer the Compliments of the day to Mrs Powell. They sincerely wish her the return of many anniversaries of it. that with each her happiness may increase—& the satisfaction of her friends thereby promoted. The President and Mrs Washington would, with pleasure, have been of Mrs Powell’s party on the present occasion, this evening, had it not been for the late...
The articles you had the goodness to send me this forenoon (when it was not in my power to acknowledge the receipt of them) came very safe, and I pray you again, to accept my thanks for the trouble I have given you in this business. Enclosed are Seventy five dollars, which is the nearest my present means will enable me to approach $74 50/100 the cost of them. Your letter to Mrs Law shall be...
My Coach horses, having performed (faithfully & well) all the duties I have required of them, they are sent to you, agreeably to my promise; hoping they will be as serviceable to whomsoever they are committed, as they have been to me; and it is my wish that they may meet with a continuance of their former kind usage. As every moment of our time while we remain in this City, will be closely...
Persuaded as Mrs Washington and myself are, that your own good sense will always dictate what under existing circumstances shall appear best, we have only to regret that in the present instance it will deprive us of the pleasure of your company to Virginia. We unite in every good wish for you & Mr Powell, and I have the honor to be with the most Affectionate regard, Your most obedt Servt ALS ,...
I pray you to accept my Compliments and thanks for having favored me with the perusal of the enclosed “Strictures &ca” — And an assurance that the sentiments and charges therein contained, have not given me a moments painful sensation. It is to be regretted, however, that the Author, if his object was to convey accurate information to the public mind had not devoted a little of the time and...
Receive, I pray you, my best thanks for the Prints you had the goodness to send me; and my acknowledgments of your kind, and obliging offer to chuse some thing handsome, with which to present Miss Custis. The difference between thirty & Sixty (or more) dollars, is not so much a matter of consideration, as the appropriate thing. I presume, she is provided with a Muff; of a tippet I am not so...
I feel much obliged by your kind & polite invitation to dine with you to day, but am under the necessity of denying myself that pleasure. I had, previously to the receipt of your Card, resolved not to dine out of my lodgings while business should detain me in the City: and, in consequence, had declined Invitations from Mr Liston, and the Chevr de Freire. But a more conclusive reason than this,...