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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Jay, John" AND Correspondent="Washington, George" AND Correspondent="Jay, John"
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[ Philadelphia ] December 31, 1778 . Asks if Congress is going to continue to employ Brigadier General Du Portail and if it intends to adopt Du Portail’s plan of defense. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Henry Laurens had resigned as President of the Continental Congress on December 9, 1778, and John Jay was elected to that position on the following day.
Philadelphia, January 27, 1779. Asks for money to carry on recruiting. States that Major General Horatio Gates has made agreements with Major General William Phillips about Convention troops. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Philadelphia, January 29, 1779. Asks permission to return to Camp. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] February 19, 1779 . States that a court-martial will be held at Springfield, Massachusetts. Advises Jay that Major General Alexander McDougall needs hard money for spy system. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] February 26, 1779 . Sends information concerning British attack and retreat at Elizabethtown. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] March 1, 1779 . Suggests that information from Europe be issued officially rather than circulated casually. Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] March 3, 1779 . States that plans for western expedition are in preparation. Discusses arrangement of Sixteen Additional Continental Battalions. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] March 15, 1779 . Reiterates request for a congressional plan “which would have a general operation throughout the States for compleating their respective Battalions.” Discusses need to continue Army at full strength and to reorganize clothing department. Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
[ Middlebrook, New Jersey, April 14, 1779. ] Explains dispute with Major General Horatio Gates. Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] April [ 22–23 ] 1779 . States that unless the quartermaster general immediately receives the money necessary for proposed Indian expedition, the expedition will have to be abandoned. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. The draft was originally dated April 22. This date was then crossed out and April 23 substituted.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] April 23, 1779 . Asks why Continental frigates are kept in port. Asks if Conrad Alexandre Gérard is returning to France. Questions wisdom of supplying Bermudian ships with flour. Asks if “any thing … can be done to restore the credit of our currency.” Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] April 29, 1779 . Describes British troop movements in Monmouth County, New Jersey. Df , in writings of James McHenry and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 3, 1779 . Advises that peace be made with only a part of the Indians. Thinks that Indians should be severely punished for past behavior. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 5, 1779 . Reports that news from Great Britain “seems to breathe a vigorous prosecution of the war.” Asks that states be urged to complete their battalions. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
[ Middlebrook, New Jersey, May 10, 1779 .] Agrees with Jay’s “summary of the causes of the national evils we feel.” Fears results of a strong British campaign during summer. Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 11, 1779 . Recommends that Brigadier General Lachlan McIntosh be allowed to serve with the Army in Georgia. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 11, 1779 . Discusses New Jersey remonstrance. Concludes that reported lack of cattle “will sensibly affect our Western expedition.” LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 14, 1779 . Reports that deputies from Delaware Nation have arrived in Camp and have been referred to Congress. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 17, 1779 . Speculates on destination of the British detachment that sailed from New York. Estimates number of British troops that sailed and number that remains. Mentions possibility of surprise attack on New York. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 25, 1779 . Is concerned about the “predatory” fighting of British. Encloses instructions to Brigadier General Charles Scott concerning reinforcements in the South. Discusses British preparations in New York. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] June 3, 1779 . Encloses information concerning British troop movements and present position of American troops. Is about “to set out this day towards the Highlands, by way of Morris Town.” LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
Smiths Clove [ New York ] June 11, 1779 . Gives information on position of British and American forces. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
New Windsor [ New York ] June 23, 1779 . Sends latest information concerning British in New York and the South. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
New Windsor [ New York ] June 27, 1779 . Complains about incompetence of clothing department and “disagreeable” treatment of Sixteen Additional Continental Regiments. Requests an allowance to provide liquor for the officers. Asks Congress to send another copy of resolve concerning brigade majors. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
New Windsor [ New York ] June 30, 1779 . States that Colonel Daniel Morgan “waits upon Congress with his resignation.” Commends Morgan. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
New Windsor [ New York ] July 21, 1779 . Discusses motives for attack on Stony Point and plans for capture of Verplanks Point. Explains why Verplanks Point was not taken and why Stony Point was evacuated. Reports that British have reoccupied Stony Point. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
West Point, July 24, 1779. Describes British movements on North River. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
[ West Point ] July 25, 1779 . States that the Marquis de Fleury wishes to return to France. Hopes that Congress will grant Fleury’s request for a furlough. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
West Point, July 29, 1779. Reports that the news of the embarkation of the British was false. Asks if powder can be obtained from Massachusetts or Connecticut. Df , in writing of H, with postscript in writing of Robert Hanson Harrison, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
West Point, August 15, 1779. Writes “that every thing in my power has been done to give success to the Western expedition.” States that “in the appeal which Genl. Sullivan has made to Congress that he has mistated several particulars of importance, and that in providing for his own justification in case of misfortune, he has left the matter upon such a footing as to place me in a delicate...
West Point, August 16, 1779. States that England’s rejection of the Spanish offer of mediation “is more strongly tinctured with insanity than any thing she has done in the course of the contest, unless she be sure of very powerful aid from some of the Northern states.” Encloses a letter from Brigadier General Anthony Wayne concerning some of Wayne’s officers. Df , in writing of H, George...
West Point, August 17, 1779. Encloses for congressional approval names of men nominated to companies of Sappers and Miners. Discusses Baron von Steuben’s need for an extra allowance. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
West Point, August 21, 1779. Explains steps taken to provide Major General John Sullivan’s men with clothing. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
[ West Point ] August 23, 1779 . Sends news of capture of Powles Hook by Major Henry Lee. Mentions Lord Stirling’s cooperation. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
West Point, August 29, 1779. Reports British-Spanish rupture. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
West Point, September 7, 1779. Describes British troop movements in New York. Discusses probable British plans and advises building up American defenses in South. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
West Point, September 14, 1779. Sends news of sailing of three British regiments. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Genl Washington presents his Complimts to Mr Livingston & Mr Jay—thanks them most cordially for their kind Information & Invitation; but is so exceedingly hurried just at this time, that it is not in his power to attend the examination of G. Forbes. He begs it may go on, and will take it exceedingly kind if Forbes and the examination when taken, be sent to head Quarters at half after four...
Your Card of the 8th Ulto I have had the honour to receive, & thank you most sincerely for your kind congratulations on our late Successes, & the polite manner in which you are pleased to apply them to me. Would to God Sir, they may be of continuance. Appearances do not justifie the hope—But—prudence forbids my adding more, in a Letter. The filial duty which withdrew you from the Comee for the...
I have been a little surprised that the several important pieces of intelligence lately received from Europe (such parts of it, I mean, as are circulated without reserve in conversation) have not been given to the public in a manner calculated to attract the attention and impress the minds of the people. As they are now propagated, they run through the country in a variety of forms, are...
Since my last of the 7th I have been honored with your favors of the 5th 6th and 8th instants with their inclosures, to which the proper attention shall be paid. I have made the Report of the Committee on Canada Affairs the subject of a particular letter which I have the honor of transmitting by this conveyance. I am with the greatest Respect Yr Excellency’s most obt Servt P.S. Lieut. Colonels...
In a letter which I had the honor of receiving from Congress dated the 2d instant was inclosed the Copy of one from Lt Colo. Fleury, upon the subject of which the president desired me to express “my Sentiments, as also of the Merits of Mr Fleury during his services in the Army.” I do not conceive that Congress should request a renewal of Colo. Fleury’s Furlough from the French Minister...
It has not been in my power to return an answer to your favor of the 6th Instt till now. The letter met me on the road, seperated from my papers, and I did not reach this place till late on the 11th; since which I have been much employed, in attending to the disposition for hutting the Army; but in the mean time the objects of the dispatch have engaged my utmost consideration. The earnest...
Since I had the Honor of addressing you on the 13th the Gentlemen appointed to meet Commissioners from Sir Henry Clinton have returned to Camp. Your Excellency will find by a Copy of their Report No. 7, which, with the other papers respecting the meeting, is inclosed, that an Exchange of prisoners has not taken place. As an exchange has not been effected, and Sir Henry Clinton has called for...
On Wednesday I had the Honor to receive Your Excellency’s Letter of the 12th Instant, with the Inclosures. I very sincerely congratulate you, sir, on the honorable and important station you are chosen to fill. The opinion I entertain of your public character concurs with every personal consideration to make the choice pleasing to me. At the same time, that my warmest acknowledgements are due...
I had the honor of addressing Congress some time since on the subject of General Du Portail and the Gentlemen with him —He informs me that his affair has not yet been decided and is extremely anxious that it should be in some way or other—He assigns many powerfull reasons to show that it is very interesting to him, if he is not to continue in our service, to return to france as speedily as...
I take the liberty of transmitting to Congress the inclosed Letter with the papers which accompany it, which I received two or three days ago from His Excellency Governor Clinton. Mr McDowel’s application seems to merit relief—whether the Barn &c. were destroyed by accident or through design. In either case the injury is the same—and may equally call for reparation by the public in the first...
The day I left Middle Brook I recd the two inclosed letters of the 8th Decemr from Major General Phillips to which I returned an answer dated the 25th which you have also inclosed. I imagined this would have put an end to any further applications of the same nature. But I yesterday recd the inclosed letters from Lord Stirling and Mr McHenry one of my Secretarys by which you will perceive that...
Colonel Rawlins who as well as his officers in general distinguished himself at the affair of Fort Washington has remaining of his Regiment about fifty or sixty men and a few officers. As the latter are at present an expence to the Continent without being employed—and the Colonel after having deserved well of his Country and suffered a grievous captivity, has some claim to attention—I beg...
I am to request that Congress will be pleased to give directions to have the military chest supplied with a sufficient sum of money to enable me to carry into execution their resolve of the 23 instant for recruiting the army during the war. Every moment is so precious, that it is to be wished notime may be lost in improving this important measure to the greatest advantage. In the papers from...