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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Jay, John" AND Correspondent="Washington, George" AND Correspondent="Jay, John"
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By the last Mail, I had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 29th of May—and have now the satisfaction to congratulate you on the adoption of the Constitution by the Convention of South Carolina. I am sorry to learn there is a probability that the majority of members in the New York Convention will be Antifederalists. Still I hope that some event will turn up before they assemble, which...
A few days ago, I had the pleasure to receive a letter of yours from Poughkeepsie—since which I have not obtained any authentic advices of the proceedings of your Convention. The clue you gave me, to penetrate into the principles & wishes of the four classes of men among you who are opposed to the Constitution, has opened a wide field for reflection & conjecture. The accession of ten States...
The letters which you did me the favor of writing to me on the 17th & 23d of last Month from Poughkeepsie, came duly to hand, & claim my particular acknowledgments. With peculiar pleasure I now congratulate you on the success of your labours to obtain an unconditional ratification of the proposed Constitution in the Covention of your State; the acct of which, was brought to us by the mail of...
The President of the United States presents his Compliments to Mr Jay, and informs him that the Harness of the President’s Carriage was so much injured in coming from Jersey that he will not be able to use it today. If Mr Jay should propose going to Church this Morng the President would be obliged to him for a Seat in his Carriage. L , in the writing of David Humphreys, NNC .
A few days ago I was conversing with you on the points contained in the enclosed queries, when a Gentleman coming in put an end to the conversation. As it is my earnest wish to adopt such a line of conduct as shall be judged most likely to secure essentials without being exposed more than is unavoidable to the charge of too much reserve on the one hand, or too much familiarity on the other, I...
Although, in the present unsettled state of the Executive Departments under the Government of the Union, I do not conceive it expedient to call upon you for information officially; yet I have supposed that some informal communications from the Office of Secretary for Foreign Affairs might neither be improper or unprofitable. For finding myself, at this moment, less occupied with the duties of...
I find myself incompetent to form any decided opinion upon the paper I received from you the other day without having a view of the transactions which have been had with the Spanish Minister. I wish also to know whether, if the negociations are renewed, it can be made to appear from anything that that Gentln has said, as the result of an advance towards it from him, in his official character?...
It is with singular pleasure that I address you as Chief Justice of the supreme Court of the United States, for which office your Commission is here enclosed. In nominating you for the important station which you now fill, I not only acted in conformity to my best judgement; but, I trust, I did a grateful thing to the good citizens of these united States: and I have a full confidence that the...
The President of the United States presents his best Compliments to the Chief Justice of the United States and his Lady, and encloses them Tickets for the Theatre this evening. As this is the last night the President proposes visiting the theatre for the season, he cannot deny himself the gratification of requesting the company of the Chief Justice and his Lady—altho’ he begs at the same time...
The President of the United States hath read with attention the Papers herewith returned, relating to our Affairs in Morocco: and as far as he can form an opinion without knowing the contents of Guiseppe Chiappe’s Letters of the 25th of April & 18th of July 1789 —no translation thereof being sent—approves the Draft of the Letters to the Emperor and Guiseppe & Francisco Chiappe; and wishes, as...
The President of the United States presents to the Chief Justice of the United States a volume of the laws passed in the first Session of the Congress of the United States, and requests his acceptance of the same. LB , DLC:GW ; copy, DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters. A note at the bottom of the letter-book copy indicates that “the same card accompanied a Volume sent to the Secretary of the...
Would there be prudence, justice or policy in extending mercy to the Convict mentioned in the enclosed Papers? Under this cover I send you for perusal two letters, just recd, from Mr Gouvr Morris. Yours sincerely and affectionately ALS , NNC : John Jay Collection. See Thomas Bird to GW, 5 June 1790 , and notes. In a letter to Gouverneur Morris of 7 July 1790, GW acknowledged receipt of...
Letter not found: to John Jay, 27 Aug. 1790. On 28 Aug. 1790 Jay wrote to GW about “the Case which I had Yesterday the Honor of recieving from you.” See also GW to John Adams, 27 Aug. 1790 (second letter), n.2 .
(Private) My dear Sir, Mount Vernon Novr 19th 1790 The day is near, when Congress is to commence its third Session; and on Monday next—nothing intervening to prevent it—I shall set out to meet them at their new residence. If any thing in the Judiciary line—if any thing of a more general nature, proper for me to communicate to that body at the opening of the Session, has occurred to you, you...
The indisposition, and consequent absence from Mount Vernon of my Nephew, Majr Washington, to whom the care of my private business is entrusted, makes it indispensably necessary for me to go home before the meeting of Congress. My stay there will be longer or shorter according to circumstances —but it cannot exceed the middle of October, as I must be back before the meeting of that Body. Will...
Your favor of the 27th of Jany came safely to hand (but not by Judge Cushing) as did your letter of the 23d of September for which I thank you. It is with pleasure I congratulate you on the increase of your family and the restoration of health to Mrs Jay—both of wch events we have heard. Mr B——’s motion, alluded to in your letter of the 27th of Jany, is only the prelude, I conceive to what is...
Being informed by Colo. Hamilton (yesterday) that you propose to commence your Southern tour tomorrow, I take the liberty of enclosing you letters to Gentlemen in the only places where I presume you will make any halt. I have not added one to Governor Lee of Virginia, because I conceive you are well acquainted with him; nor have I done it to Govr Lee of Maryland, because, unless you make a...
I certify, that the transcript below, which was permitted to be extracted from a report of the Secretary of State to the President of the United States, (dated the 10th of July 1793) by the Secretaries of Treasury and War, and inserted by them in a statement of certain facts published in Dunlap & Claypoole’s American Daily Advertiser No. 4581. is a correct quotation from the original. “On...
I thank you for the Nankeen Cotton-seed with which you had the goodness to furnish me. It shall be sent to Mount Vernon with orders to my Gardener to be particularly attentive thereto, but with little hope, I confess, of success; that climate & country being too high & cold for this plant. The common cotten has frequently been tried on my estate, but hardly ever escaped the frost, of either...
At as early an hour this morning, as you can make convenient to yourself, I should be glad to see you. At eight o’clock we breakfast. Then, or after, as suits you best, I will expect to have the satisfaction of conversing with you on an interesting subject. Yours always & sincerely ADfS , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . The subject for discussion was GW’s desire to appoint Jay a special envoy to Great...
(Secret & confidential) My dear Sir, Philadelphia 29th April 1794 Receive, I pray you, the suggestion I am going to impart with the friendship and caution the delicacy of it requires. You are already informed that I am under the necessity of recalling Mr Gouvr. Morris from France—and you can readily conceive the difficulty which occurs in finding a successor that would be agreeable to that...
Your letter of Sunday came to my hands yesterday, and for the Pamphlet enclosed, I thank you. The purport of my last to you, with the enclosure, are incontrovertible evidence that no offer had been, or could be made to the Gentleman you mention, until you had decided on the proposition which was made to yourself. The report therefore, of its having been so made, could be no other than mere...
Your letter of the 23d of June from London (and duplicate) have both been received; and your safe arrival after so short a passage, gave sincere pleasure, as well on private as on public account, to all your friends in this Country; & to none in a greater degree, I can venture to assure you, than it did to myself. As you will receive letters from the Secretary of States Office giving an...
This encloses a copy of my last —written, as you will readily perceive, with much haste; as one indication of it, I omitted the stamp of privacy; but you would not, I am well persuaded, consider it as official nor in any other light than as the private sentiments very hastily thrown together of Your Obedient and Affectionate ALS (letterpress copy), DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . See GW to Jay, 30 August .
On tuesday last I returned from my tour to the westward; on monday, Congress, by adjournment, are to meet; and on the day following, Mr Bayard, according to his present expectation, is to leave this city for London. Thus circumstanced (having so little time between my return, and the opening of the Session, to examine papers, and to prepare my communications for the legislature) you will...
Since writing to you by Mr Bayard—about the first of November —I have been favored with your letters of the 13th of Septembr and 2d of October. As the sentiments contained in the first of these, respecting the communications of Mr Monroe to the National Convention of France, were also transmitted in a private letter from you to the Secretary of State, and replied to by him (both of which I...
Your letter of the 29th Ulto resigning the Office of Chief Justice of the United States I received yesterday, & with sincere regret. For the obliging sentiments you have expressed for me in your private letter which accompanied it, I as sincerely thank you. In whatever line you may walk, my best wishes will always accompany you; they will particularly do so on the theatre you are about to...
You will have learnt from the public Gazettes, and through other more authentic channels, that all that rested with me to do to give ratification to the treaty between this country and Great Britain is already accomplished. Mr Pinckney’s absence from the Court of London; the information, and aids it was expected he would derive from Mr Shorts presence, and acquaintance with matters at that of...
Your two letters of the 14th instant came duly to hand. With respect to Mr Pickman, I beg you to be persuaded that if all things in his favor are equal, your mentioning of him will have its weight. But, in appointments of the sort he solicits, many matters must be attended to; and as I am sure we have the same wishes respecting them—namely—to fix on characters who, under all circumstances, are...
The enclosed, under cover from Sir John Sinclair, came to my hands a few days since. I sincerely wish, as well for the zealous supporter, as for the cause itself, that some measure could be devised to facilitate Sir John’s views. Can you suggest any? Aid me if you can, for I am at a loss what to say in answer to his present plan; and the Extracts relative to Mr Elkington’s discoveries in the...
Accept, my dear Sir, my thanks for your note of the 25th Instant—enclosing a copy of Mr Bayards letter to you. The purport of it is pleasing; but the conduct of the British armed Vessels in the West Indies, is intolerable beyond all forbearance. My answer, given yesterday, to the House of Representatives’ request of Papers, will, I expect, set a host of Scribblers to work: but I shall proceed...
You judged very right when in your letter of the 18th Ulto you observed I "can have very little time for private letters." But if my friends will put up with the hasty and indigested ones I can write, under such circumstances, there are a few of them (among whom allow me the gratification to place you) with whom I should feel very happy to corrispond: and while I hold my present Office, to...
Your favor of the 8th instant from Albany, was duly received; but not before arrangements for many nominations (amongst which that for the Naval Office in New York was one) had been made. From the character of Mr Remson, I have a very good opinion of his abilities and worth; but as his name was not among those which had been handed to me for this office, and as there seemed to be a concurrent...